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Industry Reports

  • The Market Research Industry
    South Africa
    04 June 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    While the global revenue of the market research industry increased by 2.3% in 2016 to exceed US$44.5bn or approximately R560bn, the African market research industry demonstrated net growth of 22.7%. In the same year, data from the European Society for Opinion and Marketing Research (ESOMAR) indicated year-on-year growth of 17.3% for the South African market research industry, signalling an upward growth trend for the first time in five years. Despite micro and small enterprises making up 70% of the domestic sector, they generate only 20% of industry turnover.
  • The Car Rental Industry
    South Africa
    29 May 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The South African car rental industry grew revenue by 3.6% in 2017 reaching an estimated total of R5.2bn. The industry continued to be driven by business car rental, which accounted for 53% of the value of all sales. The leisure market remains an important sector and during 2017 there was an increase of 16.7% in car rentals by international visitors and a 1.6% growth in local leisure rentals following on from growth of 22% and 12% respectively in the foreign and local leisure segments in the previous year. Statistics provided by the National Association of Automobile Manufacturers of South Africa (NAAMSA) show that the car rental industry accounted for an estimated 16.0% of new car sales during 2017.
  • The South African Petroleum Industry
    South Africa
    23 May 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The focus of this detailed report is the manufacture of petroleum products from crude oil and natural gas, as well as the wholesale and retail trade of the products in South Africa. According to the South African Petroleum Industry Association (SAPIA), the fuel sector contributes about 6% to the country’s GDP while supplying some 18% of South Africa’s primary energy needs through annual sales of 27 billion litres of liquid fuels. In 2016 the nine members of the South African Petroleum Industry Association (SAPIA), who are the main manufacturers of petroleum products, had total assets of R125.1bn and made an operating profit of R19bn.
  • The Minibus Taxi, Bus Services & Metered Taxi Industry
    South Africa
    18 May 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The commuter transport industry is integral to the existence, survival and growth of the South African economy as it transports people to and from work. The focus of this report is the land transport sector which includes buses, coaches, minibus taxis and metered taxis. It is a sector that is beset by problems that include unreliable services, vandalism, taxi violence and strikes. According to the Southern African Bus Operators' Association (SABOA), public bus transport has suffered major underinvestment which has driven down the quality and effectiveness of services. Meanwhile the bus rapid transit (BRT) system which has been the recipient of billions of Rands, is underused and the R15bn Gauteng BRT has been described as a failure.
  • Manufacture of Glass and Glass Products
    South Africa
    15 May 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The South African glass industry can be divided into four main sub-sectors: glass manufacturing; glass processing and distribution; fibreglass manufacturing; and industrial mineral and manual glass production. The industry has experienced a decline in manufacturing production since 2013 as a result of its dependence on the demand for glass in a number of other industries, all of which have been under pressure. The increased price of electricity and fuel has negatively impacted profits, as have cheap imports and depressed domestic sales in the automotive industry. The value of glass sales amounted to R11.12bn in 2017.
  • The Construction Sector in Madagascar
    Madagascar
    11 May 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The Malagasy construction sector is characterised by a high level of informality and most of the country’s micro-sized and small building firms remain unregistered. Many registered contractors collaborate with their unregistered counterparts, enlisting the services of informal sub-contractors for smaller projects and/or specific tasks. High-value projects are usually awarded to large foreign construction companies, which through their respective subsidiaries have established a presence in Madagascar. Over the past five years the contribution of the construction industry to the country’s GDP has averaged less than US$400m per annum which represents less than 4% of GDP.
  • The Textile Industry
    South Africa
    09 May 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    Sales of manufactured textiles were worth around R25bn in 2017, with finished textile products accounting for some R14bn. Although seeing a marginal improvement in the textile trade balance, the South African sector continues to be reliant on the export market while imports, particularly from China, remain a matter of concern. In general the industry is characterised by a relatively high number of small and micro-enterprises as well as informal operations. There were only 20 large firms employing more than 150 people in operation at the end of 2017. As a result, the market is relatively concentrated with the top five companies in the textiles sub-sector accounting for around 40% of income. The sector is relatively labour-intensive and more than 31,000 people, including a high number of women, are employed.
  • The Advertising Industry
    South Africa
    08 May 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The South African advertising industry includes advertisements for print media, radio, television, online media, cinema, direct mail and out-of-home media such as billboards. South Africa’s advertising sector is dominated by four foreign-owned international media groups, WPP (UK), Omnicom Media Group (USA), Publicis (France) and Interpublic (USA). The sector, which is predominantly male-dominated and white-owned and managed, set targets of increasing black ownership to 45% and increasing black women ownership to 30% by April 2018.
  • The Casting of Metals
    South Africa
    25 April 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The South African casting industry is varied both in terms of product and process capability. Castings are required for a wide range of applications and range from components weighing a few grams to castings for ships and off-shore oil rigs, which can weigh up to 300 tonnes. The castings sector supplies a wide range of products to most manufacturing industries with the largest output going to the Construction and General Engineering, Automotive and Mining sectors. Companies in the South African casting industry range from small specialist operations to large-scale production facilities. The sector is one of the more cohesive market sectors and is well-represented through the Aluminium Casters Association (ACA) and the South African Industry of Foundrymen (SAIF).
  • Manufacture and Wholesale of Basic Iron and Steel
    South Africa
    17 April 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The largest steel end user industries in South Africa are the building and construction and manufacturing sectors. Of concern to the four primary steel producers, ArcelorMittal South Africa (AMSA), Cape Gate, Columbus Stainless and Scaw Metals is the low growth rate currently being experienced in these important steel-consuming sectors. Although production capacity increased in 2017, by 3.3% for steel and 6% for iron, local apparent steel consumption dropped from 5.4Mt in 2013 to 4.8Mt in 2017. According to the Southern African Stainless Steel Development Association (SASSDA), local stainless steel consumption decreased by 5.6% in 2017.
  • Investigating & Security Activities including Vehicle Tracking
    South Africa
    11 April 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The compliant private security industry consists of legally-registered business entities that provide on a contractual basis a broad range of services and technology involved in the monitoring, protection and safeguarding of people and property. Demand for private security services in South Africa is driven by the high level of crime, the inability of the South African Police Service to hold back the criminal onslaught and the public’s increasing lack of faith in the police’s ability to solve crimes. South Africans are now spending an estimated R50bn annually to pay approximately 500,000 registered security officers employed by almost 9,000 compliant service providers, to safeguard their lives, homes, businesses and assets.
  • The Construction Industry in Tanzania
    Tanzania
    09 April 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    Tanzania’s construction sector is characterised by a large number of micro-entrepreneurs, the majority of whom operate in the country’s informal economy. The country’s formal construction sector comprises indigenous and indigenised firms, as well as numerous major foreign civil engineering and construction companies. As an industry with linkages to all sectors of the economy, the construction sector performs a pivotal role in Tanzania, as well as across the East African trade bloc. According to the Tanzanian National Bureau of Statistics, the market value of the construction sector at current prices increased from approximately US$6.6bn in 2016 to more than US$7bn in 2017.
  • The South African Construction Industry
    South Africa
    04 April 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The South African Construction sector focuses on all major contractors as well as emerging small, medium and micro-sized enterprises (SMMEs) that include formal contractors registered with the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) and non-registered micro-contractors that operate informally. Government-led initiatives to transform the sector and support the empowerment of SMMEs have resulted in significant restructuring of the industry and the emergence of new players. Smaller building companies, largely involved in the residential building market, are set to benefit from the government’s drive to empower SMMEs while emerging building contractors are expected to become increasingly involved in small-scale and medium-scale public projects.
  • The Tea and Coffee Industry
    South Africa
    27 March 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries statistics show that the value of black tea production has declined considerably from R30.14m eight years ago to R5.16m in the 2016/2017 season. In contrast to the black tea sector where only three black tea estates remain in production, the herbal tea sector has grown. The coffee sector has also grown, with consumption of coffee beans increasing from 29,760 tons in 2012/13 to 35,400 tons in 2015/16. Demand for premium coffees is illustrated by the growth in the number of coffee roasteries and coffee shops across the country; South Africa now has more than 100 roasteries compared to fewer than 20 roasteries ten years ago.
  • The South African Tobacco Industry
    South Africa
    26 March 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The South African tobacco industry is estimated to be worth R28.8bn and is supported by 8.2 million adult tobacco users. It is a significant contributor to the government purse, paying more than R16.6bn in excise duty and VAT in the 2016/2017 marketing season. The primary sector of the industry involves commercial and small-scale tobacco farmers situated in Limpopo, North West, Mpumalanga, Eastern Cape and Western Cape. The secondary sector focuses on the manufacture and marketing of cigarettes, pipe tobacco and snuff to the consumer. Limpopo Tobacco Processors is the biggest supplier of leaf and sells about 95% of its flue-cured tobacco to British American Tobacco, the main manufacturer in the sector.
  • The Banking Sector in Zimbabwe
    Zimbabwe
    23 March 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The report on the Zimbabwean banking industry covers the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe and deposit-taking institutions such as commercial banks, co-operatives, microfinance institutions (MFIs) and building societies. In 2016 the financial services sector contributed about 7% to GDP and total banking sector assets grew by 9.6% from US$10.26bn in September 2017 to US$11.25bn at the end of 2017. Of the current 19 licensed banks, 14 are commercial banks, four are building societies and there is one merchant bank that has been in provisional judicial management since 2015. In the sector 189 licensed MFIs are active; 184 are credit-only and money-lending MFIs while five are deposit-taking MFIs.
  • Forestry and Related services
    South Africa
    13 March 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    Forestry South Africa (FSA) members include 11 corporate timber companies, approximately 1,100 commercial timber farmers and 20,000 small growers who collectively own or manage 91.6% of regulated afforestation. According to the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF), there are approximately 300 primary processing plants classified as saw, pulp and board mills in the country. FSA reported that total 2016 forestry contribution to GDP, when paper and paper packaging are included, was R58.2bn or 1.53% of GDP.
  • Manufacture of Spices
    South Africa
    08 March 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    South Africa imports a variety of raw spices from Russia, China, India, Sri Lanka, Egypt, Australia and Thailand. The spices are cleaned, milled, blended and packed in South Africa, thus ensuring the safety of the final product as there are some international suppliers that add corn starch, maize meal and flour as fillers. Dried, crushed and ground chillies account for 20% of all spice imports. Other significant spice imports are coriander seeds, turmeric and whole pepper. Locally approximately 10,000 tons of chillies and peppers are produced every year in the main growing areas of Mpumalanga, Limpopo, North West and KwaZulu-Natal.
  • The Agri-Business Sector in Botswana
    Botswana
    01 March 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    Although the contribution of the agricultural sector to Botswana’s GDP continues to decrease, reaching only 2.1% in 2017, the sector is the mainstay of the rural economy. World Bank data shows that 42% of Botswana’s population live in rural areas and approximately 70% of rural households depend on subsistence farming for their livelihood. More than 80% of the income of the agricultural sector is derived from livestock, while crop production contributes slightly less than 20%.
  • The Footwear Industry
    South Africa
    26 February 2018
    R 14 400.00 (ZAR)  
    estimated $ 1 081.44 (USD) *
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    The South African footwear industry, a sector that includes the manufacture, wholesale, import and retail of shoes, slippers, boots and safety shoes, is proving resilient in the face of tough economic conditions and is worth approximately R54.9bn. The manufacturing sales value of the industry was estimated to be worth R5.5bn in 2016, up from 4.5bn in 2014. The industry is well-organised and represented by the Southern African Footwear and Leather Industries Association (SAFLIA) and the South African Footwear and Leather Export Council (SAFLEC), which promotes, facilitates and networks South African-made footwear internationally. SAFLIA statistics show that 193 footwear manufacturers employed 11,937 people.

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