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Construction Industry Kenya

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2023

Carole Veitch | Kenya | 20 December 2023

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2020

Carole Veitch | Kenya | 15 September 2020

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2017

Carole Veitch | Kenya | 15 March 2017

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015

Martin Rothschild | Kenya | 22 June 2015

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015

Martin Rothschild | Kenya | 09 March 2015

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2014

Martin Rothschild | Kenya | 29 May 2014

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Report Coverage

This report on the construction industry in Kenya includes comprehensive information on the state and size of the industry, numbers of contactors and registered projects, infrastructure and road development, housing, and renewable energy projects. There is information on notable players, labour and wages, environmental issues and input costs and bank loans and government spending on construction. The report includes profiles of 24 companies such as dominant Chinese companies including China Communications Construction Company, China Wu Yi Company and China Jiangxi Corporation, and local contractors such as Associated Construction, Cementers, Epco Builders, Intex Construction, Hayer Bishan Singh & Sons and Landmark Holdings. Zutari (formerly Aurecon Africa) opened its Nairobi office in July 2023. The South African company is registered with the Engineers’ Board of Kenya in civil and electrical engineering and specialises in installing transport technology.

Introduction

• As a gateway to East and Central Africa and an emerging transport and logistics hub, Kenya is the nucleus of the East African construction sector.
• The construction industry is an important driver of socio-economic development and job creation.
• The value of construction output in Kenya increased by 4.1% in 2022 and the sector contributed 7.1% to gross domestic product.
• Kenya’s ambitious infrastructure programme includes the development of transport corridors aimed at supporting sustainable economic development, boosting trade with neighbouring countries and integrating communities in remote areas into the national economy.

Trends

• China’s dominance in civil construction appears to be gradually diminishing.
• Demand for infrastructure that includes coastal and flood defences, storm water drainage systems and water reservoirs.
• Demand for renewable energy infrastructure, power storage and transmission infrastructure.
• Focus on environmental sustainability, workplace diversity and inclusivity, and safety.
• New technologies are making certain construction tasks easier.
• The expanding housing deficit is being driven by population expansion and urbanisation.
• Urban planning is becoming increasingly centred around sustainability and promoting a healthy lifestyle.

Opportunities

• A growing market for sustainably sourced natural building materials.
• Kenya Airports Authority’s planned upgrade of Jomo Kenyatta International. Procurement is expected to begin in January 2024.
• Kenya Ports Authority will be partnering with private companies to construct additional berths at the new Lamu Port.
• Opportunities in affordable housing, notably in modular housing.
• Renewable energy is a high-growth sector.
• Sustainable waste management infrastructure is required, including recycling plants.
• Tatu City special economic zone offers tax incentives to investors.
• The Kenyan government encourages public-private partnerships and plans to grant concessions to private service providers for Mombasa’s port operations.
• The Two Rivers International Finance & Innovation Centre is a private service-focused special economic zone.

Challenges

• Corruption is prevalent, particularly in the awarding of tenders.
• Funding constraints have resulted in delays, project suspensions and non-payment of contractors.
• High level of non-compliance with construction regulations poses safety risks.
• Local contractors are unable to compete successfully for high-value civil engineering projects due to the dominance of foreign companies.
• Supply-chain disruptions persist, but are easing.
• The cost of construction is high and the availability of certain construction materials is unreliable.
• Unforeseen events, including further pandemics, extreme weather events, geopolitical risks, regional instability and security risks.

Outlook

• The Kenyan construction sector has grown during a period of unprecedented challenges.
• Despite funding challenges and project delays, Kenya is on track to achieve its target of generating 100% of its energy from renewable resources by 2030.
• Downside risks to growth include the country’s high level of debt and funding constraints.
• The enlistment of the Kenya Defence Forces to undertake public infrastructure projects is a notable initiative to reduce project costs and accelerate delivery.
• The government’s greater willingness to partner with the private sector and foreign investors could ease the country’s reliance on China as a source of funding.

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2023

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R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1044.05 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2020-09-15

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2017-03-15

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-06-22

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-03-09

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2014-05-29

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. COUNTRY INFORMATION 1
3. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 4
3.1. Industry Value Chain 7
3.2. Geographic Position 9
3.3. Size of the Industry 11
4. LOCAL 14
4.1. State of the Industry 14
4.2. Key Trends 23
4.3. Key Issues 24
4.4. Notable Players 24
4.5. Corporate Actions 25
4.6. Regulations 26
4.7. Enterprise Development and Social Development 27
5. AFRICA 28
6. INTERNATIONAL 31
7. INFLUENCING FACTORS 33
7.1. Unforeseen Events 33
7.2. Economic Environment 33
7.3. Labour 34
7.4. Environmental Issues 36
7.5. Technology, R&D, Innovation 37
7.6. Government Support 39
7.7. Input Costs 40
8. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 41
8.1. Competition 41
8.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 42
8.3. Barriers to Entry 42
9. INDUSTRY SUMMARY 42
10. OUTLOOK 44
11. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 44
12. REFERENCES 53
12.1. Publications 53
12.2. Websites 54
APPENDIX 1 55
Summary of Major Road Projects 55
APPENDIX 2 58
Summary of Notable Players 58
ANNEXURE 1 65
Industry Legislation* 65
COMPANY PROFILES 69
14Trees Ltd 69
Associated Construction Co. (Kenya) Ltd 71
Cementers Ltd 73
China Communications Construction Company Ltd 75
China Jiangxi Corporation for International Economic and Technical Cooperation Co Ltd 79
China Jiangxi International Kenya Ltd 82
China Road and Bridge Corporation 83
China Wu Yi Company Ltd 85
China Zhongxing Construction Company Ltd 87
Eco-Homes Ltd 88
EPCO Builders Ltd 89
Fubeco (China Fushun) Ltd 91
Hayer Bishan Singh & Sons Ltd 93
Intex Construction Ltd 95
Kenya Railways Corporation 97
KOTO Housing Kenya Ltd 99
Landmark Holdings Ltd 101
Laxmanbhai Construction Ltd 103
Lee Construction Ltd 105
National Housing Corporation 107
Njuca Consolidated Company Ltd 110
Oriental Construction Company Ltd 112
TransCentury PLC 114
Zutari Kenya Ltd 118

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the construction industry in Kenya and includes comprehensive information on the state and size of the sector, country information, notable developments and corporate actions and various influencing factors. There are profiles of 20 companies including Chinese companies that dominate the civil construction market such as China Wu Yi, Fubeco (China Fushun) and China Jiangxi Corporation. Local companies profiled include Hayer Bishan Singh & Sons, which is part of the Hayer Group, Intex Construction, Laxmanbhai Construction, Parbat Siyani Construction, Landmark Holdings and Cementers.

Introduction

The Kenyan construction industry contributed 5.6% to GDP in 2019 and provided employment to almost 222,000 people. With economic growth averaging over 5% per annum over the past ten years and oil production underway, the Kenyan government was on the cusp of rolling out an expansive infrastructure development programme comprising 80 public-private partnership projects with a combined value of KSh1.14-trillion (shillings) (US$10.8bn). However, since coronavirus made landfall in Kenya on 12 March 2020, the country has been thrust into crisis and the government’s infrastructure development plan hangs in the balance. Although Kenya’s construction industry has been hard hit by global supply chain disruptions and the protracted closure of building sites, role players say it has a vital role to play in building the defences needed in the battle against the pandemic.

Strengths

• Economic growth of over 5% per annum over the past decade has seen Kenya become one of the largest economies in sub-Saharan Africa.
• Infrastructure development is a central pillar of Kenya’s Vision 2030. As of 1 June 2019, 51 high-value projects (US$50m and above) with a combined value US$36bn had broken ground in Kenya.
• Kenya is a strategically located economic hub, which is well-positioned to serve its land-locked neighbours through transport corridors.
• The construction industry serves all sectors of the economy and is a key driver of socio-economic development.
• The Kenyan government offers attractive investment incentives.

Weaknesses

• Although the construction industry is regulated, enforcement of regulations is not systematic and consequently, Kenya’s construction industry has a relatively poor safety record.
• Chinese construction companies have been awarded over 70% of Kenya’s large public sector infrastructure projects.
• Corruption is endemic.
• Experienced construction professionals and skilled artisans are in short supply.
• Funding short-falls have resulted in project delays and non-payment of contractors.
• Kenya is largely reliant on external funding for public infrastructure projects.
• The cost of construction materials is high and certain products have to be imported, because local equivalents are substandard.
• The industry is highly male-dominated.
• There is a high degree of job-insecurity, as workers are commonly hired on a project-to-project basis.

Opportunities

• In its priority list of public-private partnership projects, the Kenyan government has identified 80 projects to be rolled out by June 2021.
• Mega-projects, notably the Lapsset transport corridor and the Konza Technopolis.
• Opportunities in the nascent oil industry include the construction of an oil pipeline connecting the Kenyan oil fields to the port of Lamu.
• Provision of bulk water supply and sanitation infrastructure.
• The construction of healthcare and quarantine facilities, using modular building solutions.
• The development of renewable energy infrastructure.
• The development of sustainable ‘green’ building solutions.
• The provision of affordable housing.
• Urban design and spatial planning solutions for the upgrading of slums and informal settlements.

Threats

• Domestic economic pressures resulting in lower levels of government infrastructure expenditure and weaker private sector investment.
• Funding shortfalls leading to the delayed implementation of construction projects.
• Geopolitical events, regional instability and the escalation of terrorist activity.
• Global recessionary pressures, resulting in weaker foreign direct investment inflows.
• The coronavirus pandemic poses a massive threat to lives and livelihoods. An increase in infections is likely to cause further work stoppages and supply chain disruptions.

Outlook

Kenya’s economic growth prospects for 2020 have been laid to waste by the coronavirus crisis. Commentators say that the Kenyatta administration will need to re-orientate expenditure budgeted for non-essential infrastructure projects to responses aimed at countering the spread of the virus. Although some role players warn that the extent of the pandemic’s impact on the construction sector should not be underestimated, others say that China, which is heavily invested in Kenya’s infrastructure development programme, could cushion the blow at this critical juncture. China, which has flattened its coronavirus curve, is well-positioned to provide vital expertise, materials and support to rapidly roll out the healthcare infrastructure that is so urgently required, along with social housing and basic services for people living in Kenya’s overcrowded informal settlements.

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2020

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R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.43 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2023-12-20

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1044.05 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2017-03-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-06-22

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-03-09

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2014-05-29

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. COUNTRY PROFILE 1
2.1. Geographic Position 2
3. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 4
3.1. Industry Value Chain 5
4. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
5. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
5.1. Local 7
5.1.1. Corporate Actions 12
5.1.2. Regulations 12
5.2. Continental 14
5.3. International 18
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 21
6.1. Economic Environment 21
6.2. Socio-Political and Socio-Economic Environment 22
6.3. Infrastructure Development 23
6.4. Urbanisation 24
6.5. Local Content 25
6.6. Corruption 25
6.7. Construction Equipment and Materials: Capacity, Quality and Security of Supply 26
6.8. Input Costs 27
6.9. Cyclicality 28
6.10. Health and Safety Concerns 28
6.11. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 29
6.12. Labour 31
6.13. Environmental Concerns 33
7. COMPETITION 34
7.1. Barriers to Entry 35
8. SWOT ANALYSIS 36
9. OUTLOOK 37
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 38
11. REFERENCES 38
11.1. Publications 38
11.2. Websites 39
APPENDIX 1 41
Summary of Notable Indigenous and Foreign Players 41
APPENDIX 2 50
The 2019 Global Competitiveness Index: Kenya 50
COMPANY PROFILES 53
CEMENTERS LTD 53
CHINA JIANGXI INTERNATIONAL KENYA LTD 55
CHINA OVERSEAS ENGINEERING GROUP COMPANY LTD 57
CHINA WU YI COMPANY LTD 59
CHINA ZHONGXING CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 61
ECO-HOMES LTD 62
EPCO BUILDERS LTD 63
FUBECO (CHINA FUSHUN) LTD 65
HAYER BISHAN SINGH & SONS LTD 67
INTEX CONSTRUCTION LTD 69
KENYA RAILWAYS CORPORATION 71
KOTO HOUSING KENYA LTD 74
LANDMARK HOLDINGS LTD 76
LAXMANBHAI CONSTRUCTION LTD 78
LEE CONSTRUCTION LTD 80
MEINHARDT (SINGAPORE) PTE LTD 82
MOHA KENYA LTD 84
MULJI DEVRAJ & BROTHERS LTD 86
NATIONAL HOUSING CORPOATION 88
NJUCA CONSOLIDATED COMPANY LTD 91
ORIENTAL CONSTRUCTION KENYA LTD 93
PARBAT SIYANI CONSTRUCTION LTD 95
PRISM CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 97
STAMFORD LTD 99
TRANSCENTURY PLC 100
VICTORY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 104

Report Coverage

The detailed report on the Kenyan construction industry focuses on opportunities and conditions in the sector, challenges and key trends, and factors influencing the industry’s success. Profiles for 22 companies are provided, including major Chinese companies such as China Communications Construction Company Limited (CCCC) and its wholly-owned subsidiary, the China Road and Bridge Corporation (CRBC), which focus on the high value civil engineering and construction market. Also profiled are local companies Spencon Holding Limited and EPCO Builders Limited, as well as Lee Construction, which has been identified by market analysts as ‘the fastest-growing indigenous construction company in Kenya.’

Introduction

Infrastructure development is a central pillar of Kenya’s Vision 2030. The strategic plan, which envisages the transformation of the East African nation into an industrialised, middle income country, acknowledges the key role to be played by private companies in the financing and implementation of construction projects across all sectors of the Kenyan economy. Since 2012 Kenya’s US$3bn construction industry has sustained robust growth and with crude oil production in the Great Rift Valley set to commence in the first half of 2017, many analysts predict that the country is on the cusp of an unprecedented construction boom. However, with Kenyans headed for the polls on 8 August 2017, a mood of uncertainty is setting in across the country. The economy’s pace has slowed, as investors cautiously await the outcome of a General Election that is widely expected to be closely contested.

Strengths

• Kenya is a key economic hub, which, through the development of transport infrastructure networks and transit corridors, serves its land-locked East African neighbours.
• Kenya’s Vision 2030 provides a blueprint for the roll out of infrastructure development projects.
• The construction industry serves all sectors of the economy and is a key driver of socio-economic development, providing shelter, employment and infrastructure.
• The Kenyan construction sector has experienced sustained growth in recent years.

Weaknesses

• Although the construction industry is highly regulated, there is little enforcement of regulations and infringements are seldom punished.
• Corruption is rife in the industry.
• Kenya’s construction industry has a poor safety record.
• Skilled construction workers are in short supply.
• The cost of inputs is generally high.

Opportunities

• Kenya’s Vision 2030 gives high priority to investments in infrastructure.
• Mega projects, notably the LAPSSET project, the Konza City Silicon Valley’ project and Phase 2 of the Standard Gauge Railway.
• Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) offer a broad spectrum of opportunities.
• The Common Market for East and Southern Africa (Comesa) offers regional construction opportunities.
• The nascent oil & gas sector presents many new opportunities.
• With the implementation of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, renewable energy projects are expected to attract greater investment.

Threats

•  External global pressures, including the slowing of growth in both the developed and emerging market economies, particularly China, which could result in lower levels of investment.
• Domestic macroeconomic pressures.
• Political instability linked to the 2017 General Election.
• Regional instability and the escalation of terrorist activity.
• The delayed implementation of large projects and/or the failure to implement proposed public sector infrastructure development projects.

Outlook

With electioneering underway across Kenya ahead of the August 2017 General Election, analysts anticipate that there could be a flurry of construction activity in the public sphere, as the incumbent administration of President Uhuru Kenyatta endeavours to complete priority projects in its pipeline. While building and construction activity in the public sector is expected to be brisker during the first eight months of the year, activity is expected to be significantly slower in the private sector, pending the outcome of the election. Although Kenya has enjoyed a relatively lengthy period of political stability, accusations about election fraud have served to resuscitate tensions between the political parties and their respective supporters. However, provided that the elections are free, fair and peaceful, stakeholders are generally optimistic that the Kenyan economy, along with the country’s construction industry, will swiftly regain the high road.

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.43 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2023-12-20

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1044.05 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2020-09-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-06-22

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-03-09

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2014-05-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 10
4.1. Local 10
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 19
4.1.2. Regulations and Government Policies 20
4.2. Continental 23
4.3. International 27
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 29
5.1. Economic Environment 29
5.2. Socio-Political and Socio-Economic Environment 31
5.3. Infrastructure Deficit 32
5.3.1. Government Infrastructure Programme Spend 33
5.3.2. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) 33
5.3.3. Private Sector Investment 34
5.3.4. Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) 34
5.4. Urbanisation 35
5.5. Local Content 35
5.6. Corruption 36
5.7. Construction Equipment and Materials: Capacity, Quality and Security of Supply 36
5.8. Input Costs 37
5.9. Cyclicality 37
5.10. Health and Safety Concerns 38
5.11. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 38
5.12. Labour 41
5.13. Environmental Concerns 43
6. COMPETITION 45
6.1. Barriers to Entry 46
6.2. Public Procurement and the Tendering Process 47
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 47
8. OUTLOOK 48
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 48
10. REFERENCES 49
10.1. Publications 49
10.2. Websites 50
APPENDIX 1 52
The Global Competitiveness Index 2016-2017: Kenya 52
APPENDIX 2 53
National Priority List of Public-Private Partnership (PPP) Projects 53
COMPANY PROFILES 55
ATLAS DEVELOPMENT & SUPPORT SERVICES LTD 55
CHINA JIANGXI INTERNATIONAL KENYA LTD 59
CHINA OVERSEAS ENGINEERING GROUP COMPANY LTD 60
CHINA WU YI COMPANY LTD 62
CHINA ZHONGXING CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 64
ECO-HOMES LTD 65
EPCO BUILDERS LTD 66
FUBECO (CHINA FUSHUN) LTD 68
INTEX CONSTRUCTION LTD 70
KENYA RAILWAYS CORPORATION 72
KOTO HOUSING KENYA LTD 75
LEE CONSTRUCTION LTD 77
MEINHARDT (SINGAPORE) PTE LTD 78
MOHA KENYA LTD 80
MULJI DEVRAJ & BROTHERS LTD 82
NATIONAL HOUSING CORPORATION 84
NJUCA CONSOLIDATED COMPANY LTD 86
ORIENTAL CONSTRUCTION KENYA LTD 88
PARBAT SIYANI CONSTRUCTION LTD 90
PRISM CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 92
SPENCON HOLDINGS LTD 94
VICTORY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 96

Introduction

The Kenyan construction industry has seen significant growth over the past year and has been one the main drivers of an estimated GDP growth of 5.8% in 2014, according to the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics. The construction industry was estimated to have grown by 13.1% in 2014, up from 7.3% in 2013. The Kenyan government has invested heavily in its infrastructure development programme, which has attracted foreign interest from large corporations to take on these mega-projects. A number of Kenyan projects relating to the Lamu Port-South Sudan-Ethiopia-Transport and Economic Development (LAPSSET) broke ground in 2014 and early 2015 and construction began on the Standard Gauge Railway (SGR), although there have been delays because of land disputes. Despite a number of problems, including increasing corruption, a reduction in tourism as a result of negative geopolitical associations and security fears and the attack by al-Shabaab on Garissa University in April 2015, Kenya has remained economically and politically stable and maintained international credibility. This report takes look at the abovementioned factors as well as providing an update on what has happened in the Kenyan construction industry during the last year, with specific focus on the last three months.

Strengths

• A forward-looking, economically-motivated government with sound economic policies.
• A new constitution and a newly enacted legal framework which supports free-market economic activities.
• A well-established port in Mombasa.
• Can draw upon and follow Chinese expertise which is prevalent in the country.
• Excellent trade relations with countries in the region.
• Healthy competition exists between construction firms in the sector.
• Prime access to the region’s infrastructure network.
• Resilience against military and political attacks.
• Strong input production and electricity generation.
• Sufficient availability of raw material and natural resources in the country is supportive for the industry.
• The sector serves the largest economy in East Africa.

Weaknesses

• A relatively inexperienced regulatory body governs the construction industry.
• An entrenched culture of corruption and bribe-taking, which has worsened in recent years according to international reports.
• Geo-political location near to Burundi which could hamper international relations.
• International perception is weakened by political and military events.
• Lack of technical and artisanal skills available.
• Located in a part of the world that many developed countries still remain sceptical about.
• Long distances between viable locations with poor infrastructure in between.

Opportunities

• Foreign Aid projects by humanitarian organisations in remote parts of the country.
• Heavy and more in-depth investment in railway and construction projects in the country.
• Kenya’s Vision 2030 will present a significant number of opportunities in the short- and medium-term.
• Konza ‘Silicon Valley’ project.
• New power sources will provide capacity in the country for construction expansion.
• New rare-earth deposits discovered off the Kenyan coast.
• Process of devolution increasing foreign interest in Kenya.
• The drive for more and better quality education facilities.
• The LAPSSET project will require many capable construction firms to ensure its completion.
• The roll-out of low- and medium-cost housing programmes.

Threats

• Bottlenecks in the transport infrastructure.
• Chinese construction firms look to secure all the major contracts offered in the country.
• Terrorist activities in and around the country by Al-Qaeda cells, the recent attack on Garissa University and continued attacks by al-Shabaab.
• The high prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the construction workforce.
• The relative ease of doing business in neighbouring Rwanda.

Outlook

Construction Industry Forecast Various market analysts have stated that Kenya is on the verge of its biggest construction boom to date. The Deloitte African Construction Trends Report 2014, which was released in early March 2015, listed all the significant infrastructure and construction projects included in this report, specifically the KSh345bn standard gauge railway from Mombasa to Nairobi, the KSh2-trillion LAPSSET project, and the KSh900bn Konza City development. The country has tens of multi-billion Shilling infrastructure and private construction projects fuelling economic growth. The construction industry is not only benefitting from sustained GDP growth in Kenya, it is actively propelling it with a higher year-on-year growth figure of 13.1% in 2014, compared to 5.8% in 2013. The industry has attracted substantial foreign interest as a stable political environment and high growth numbers provide an attractive opportunity for international corporations. New policies coming from the government also make it easier for these companies to obtain contracting licences, which has further motivated foreign companies to invest. Negative perceptions of corruption and local contractor inefficiency are still present. However in the short- and medium-term these worries are outweighed by the potential gains for companies and that with the correct expertise, these problems can be addressed and corrected. Deloitte’s African Construction Trends Report 2014 also found that 60% of Kenya’s infrastructure projects are in the transport sector and 37% in the energy sector. The construction industry can only benefit from these projects going forward, as increased infrastructural capacity will lead to further development and more construction projects. Macroeconomic Outlook According to the World Bank’s Kenya Economic Update, the country is set to become one of the fastest growing economies in sub-Saharan Africa, with growth for 2015 projected at 6%. Diarietou Gaye, the World Bank’s Country Director for Kenya stated, “Kenya is emerging as one of Africa’s key growth centres with sound economic policies in place for future improvement. To sustain momentum, Kenya needs to continue investing in infrastructure and jobs, improve its business climate, and boost its exports.” Drastically lowered inflation rates will provide economic stimulation in the short-term and a positive international image as well as recovering international markets will provide investment in Kenya in the medium-term. The widening of the country’s trade deficit is troubling but market commentators believe that as long as infrastructure projects are completed timeously there will be problems recovering the gap. International economic analysts predict the increased growth of emerging market economies in 2015, despite recoveries from strong international economies such as the United States and United Kingdom. World trade is expected to increase by 1.5% in 2015. Lower oil prices also make it easier for emerging market economies to thrive in the international economy because of the lower cost of transporting goods as well as cheaper input prices in the production process. With more electricity generation coming online and lower oil prices, inflation is expected to ease in the country. Discoveries in the mining, oil, and gas sectors will also bring sustained investment in the medium- to long-term. Kenya was recently classified as a lower scale middle-income country, and in order to cement its place as a middle-income country, analysts believe that improving the manufacturing sector is essential. Government fiscal policies in the 2015/2016 national budget focus on the re-orientation of expenditure from recurrent to development. The prediction of government officials is that private sector investment will remain consistent through 2015. All other macroeconomic indicators suggest stability and growth for the remainder of 2015. Political Outlook The reformation of the regulatory system has inspired confidence in the governing powers and has encouraged more robust participation in the country by foreign powers. However, the terrorist attacks by al-Shabaab and the presence of the al-Qaeda branch in East Africa affect the perceived safety and stability of the region. Despite the spate of attacks, Kenya has not retaliated in a destructive way and the Kenyan people have been perceived by the international community as resilient and peaceful. The political situation in Burundi has also had a significant effect on perception of the East African region and Kenya specifically because of its partnership with Burundi in the East African Community. However, Kenya has not seen the same protests and flouting of constitutional values because of the stability and law-abiding characteristics of present Kenyan politics. The biggest challenge to the Kenyan political situation is the spread of terrorism and terrorist activities in the country. How this is dealt with will determine the political stability of the nation over the short- to medium-term.

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.43 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2023-12-20

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1044.05 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2020-09-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2017-03-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-03-09

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2014-05-29

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. SIZE AND STRUCTURE OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Geographic Position 1
2.2. Key Cities and Regions 2
2.3. Size of the Industry 3
2.3.1. Key Indigenous and Foreign Players 4
3. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
3.1. Local 9
3.1.1. Corporate Actions 10
3.1.2. Regulations 11
3.1.3. Market Opportunities for the Construction Industry 14
3.1.3.1. Transport 14
3.1.3.2. Energy/Power 17
3.1.3.3. Water Supply and Treatment 20
3.1.3.4. Healthcare 21
3.1.3.5. Education 22
3.1.3.6. Telecommunications 24
3.1.3.7. Residential Building 25
3.1.3.8. Commercial 26
3.1.3.9. Retail 27
3.1.3.10. Hotels and Tourism 29
3.1.3.11. Mining and Industrial 30
3.2. Continental 33
4. INFLUENCING FACTORS 39
4.1. Economic Environment 39
4.1.1. General 39
4.1.2. Effects on the Construction Sector 40
4.2. Socio-Political Environment 40
4.3. Infrastructure Deficit 43
4.3.1. Government Infrastructure Programme Spend 43
4.3.2. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) 44
4.3.3. Private Sector Investment 45
4.4. Urbanisation 46
4.5. Local Content 47
4.6. Corruption 49
4.7. Industry Supply Chain 50
4.7.1. Capacity, Quality and Security of Supply 50
4.8. Industry Specific Issues 51
4.8.1. General Trends 51
4.8.2. Input Costs 52
4.8.3. Cyclicality 53
4.8.4. Health and Safety 53
4.9. Competition 55
4.9.1. Barriers to Entry 55
4.9.2. Public Procurement and the Tendering Process 55
4.10. Labour Resources 56
4.10.1. Licensing 56
4.10.2. Skills Shortages 56
4.10.3. Increasing Demand for Construction Workers 57
4.10.4. Training and Skills Development 57
4.10.5. Opportunities for Foreign Professionals 58
4.11. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 58
4.12. Environmental Concerns 59
5. SWOT ANALYSIS 61
6. OUTLOOK 62
6.1. Construction Industry Forecast 62
6.2. Macroeconomic Outlook 63
6.3. Political Outlook 64
7. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 64
8. REFERENCES 66
8.1. Publications 66
8.2. Websites 67
COMPANY PROFILES 68
ATLAS DEVELOPMENT & SUPPORT SERVICES LTD 68
CHINA JIANGXI INTERNATIONAL KENYA LTD 72
CHINA OVERSEAS ENGINEERING GROUP COMPANY LTD 73
CHINA WU YI COMPANY LTD 75
CHINA ZHONGXING CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 78
FUBECO (CHINA FUSHUN) LTD 79
INTEX CONSTRUCTION LTD 81
KENYA RAILWAYS CORPORATION 83
LEE CONSTRUCTION LTD 85
MOHA KENYA LTD 87
MULJI DEVRAJ & BROTHERS LTD 88
NATIONAL HOUSING CORPORATION 90
NJUCA CONSOLIDATED COMPANY LTD 92
ORIENTAL CONSTRUCTION KENYA LTD 94
PARBAT SIYANI CONSTRUCTION LTD 96
PRISM CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 98
SPENCON HOLDINGS LTD 100
VICTORY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 102

Introduction

The Kenyan construction industry has seen significant growth over the past year and has been one the main drivers of an estimated GDP growth of 5.4% in 2014, according to the World Bank. The construction industry was estimated to have grown by 11.1% in 2014, up from 8.6% in 2013. The Kenyan government has heavily invested in its infrastructure development programme, which has attracted foreign interest from large corporations to take on these mega-projects. A number of Kenyan projects relating to the Lamu Port-South Sudan-Ethiopia-Transport (LAPSSET) Corridor project broke ground in 2014 and early 2015. However, the tourism industry in the country contracted further as a result of negative geopolitical associations and security fears. The issue of corruption has also not been tackled effectively by stakeholders as the country fell further on the Corruption Perceptions Index. This report provides an update on what has happened in the Kenyan construction industry in the last nine months as well as focusing on the above-mentioned factors.

Strengths

• A forward-looking, economically-motivated government with sound economic policies.
• A new constitution and a newly enacted legal framework which supports free-market economic activities.
• A positive international image.
• A well-established port in Mombasa.
• Can draw upon and follow Chinese expertise which is prevalent in the country.
• Excellent trade relations with countries in the region.
• Healthy competition exists between construction firms in the sector.
• Prime access to the region’s infrastructure network.
• Sufficient availability of raw material and natural resources in the country is supportive for the industry.
• The sector serves the largest economy in East Africa.

Weaknesses

• A relatively inexperienced regulatory body governs the construction industry.
• An entrenched culture of corruption and bribe-taking, which has worsened in recent years according to international reports.
• International perception is weakened by political and military events.
• Lack of technical and artisanal skills available.
• Located in a part of the world that many developed countries still remain sceptical about.
• Long distances between viable locations with poor infrastructure in between.

Opportunities

• Foreign Aid projects by humanitarian organisations in remote parts of the country.
• Heavy and more in-depth investment in railway and construction projects in the country.
• Kenya’s Vision 2030 will present a significant number of opportunities in the short- and medium-term.
• Konza ‘Silicon Valley’ project.
• New power sources will provide capacity in the country for construction expansion.
• New rare-earth deposits discovered off the Kenyan coast.
• The drive for more and better quality education facilities.
• The LAPSSET project will require many capable construction firms to ensure its completion.
• The roll-out of low- and medium-cost housing programmes.

Threats

• Bottlenecks in the transport infrastructure.
• Chinese construction firms look to secure all the major contracts offered in the country.
• Rising input costs in the industry.
• Terrorist activities in and around the country by Al-Qaeda cells.
• The high prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the construction workforce.
• The relative ease of doing business in neighbouring Rwanda.
• Widespread poverty.

Outlook

Construction Industry Forecast Various market analysts have stated that Kenya is on the verge of its biggest construction boom to date. The Deloitte African Construction Trends Report 2014, which was released in early March 2015, listed all the significant infrastructure and construction projects included in this report, specifically the KSh345bn standard gauge railway from Mombasa to Nairobi, the KSh2-trillion LAPSSET project, and the KSh900bn Konza City development. The country has tens of multi-billion Shilling infrastructure and private construction projects fuelling economic growth. The construction industry is not only benefitting from sustained GDP growth in Kenya, it is actively propelling it with a higher year-on-year growth figure of 11.1%, compared to 5.4%. The industry has attracted substantial foreign interest as a stable political environment and high growth numbers provide an attractive opportunity for international corporations. New policies coming from the government also make it easier for these companies to obtain contracting licences, which has further motivated foreign companies to invest. Negative perceptions of corruption and local contractor inefficiency are still present. However in the short- and medium-term these worries are outweighed by the potential gains for companies and that with the correct expertise, these problems can be addressed and corrected. The construction industry can only benefit from the country’s major infrastructure projects going forward, as increased infrastructural capacity will lead to further development and even more construction projects. Macroeconomic Outlook According to the World Bank’s Kenya Economic Update, the country is set to become one of the fastest growing economies in sub-Saharan Africa, with growth for 2015 projected at 6%. Diarietou Gaye, the World Bank’s Country Director for Kenya stated, “Kenya is emerging as one of Africa’s key growth centres with sound economic policies in place for future improvement. To sustain momentum, Kenya needs to continue investing in infrastructure and jobs, improve its business climate, and boost its exports.” Drastically lowered inflation rates will provide economic stimulation in the short-term and a positive international image as well as recovering international markets will provide investment in Kenya in the medium-term. The widening of the country’s trade deficit is troubling but market commentators believe that as long as infrastructure projects are completed timeously there will be problems recovering the gap. Discoveries in the mining, oil, and gas sectors will also bring sustained investment in the medium- to long-term. Kenya was recently classified as a lower scale middle-income country, and in order to cement its place as a middle-income country, analysts believe that improving the manufacturing sector is essential. Political Outlook According to market commentators, the stabilisation of the political environment in Kenya is expected to be maintained as the country goes through a period of economic growth and sustained peace. The reformation of the regulatory system has inspired confidence in the governing powers and has encouraged more robust participation in the country by foreign powers. The biggest challenge to the Kenyan political situation is the spread of terrorism and terrorist activities in the country. How this is dealt with will determine the political stability of the nation over the short- to medium-term.

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2017-03-15

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-06-22

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. SIZE AND STRUCTURE OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Geographic Position 1
2.2. Key Cities and Regions 2
2.3. Size of the Industry 2
2.4. Key Indigenous and Foreign Players 3
3. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
3.1. Size of the Industry 9
3.1.1. Corporate Actions and Investment 9
3.1.2. Regulations 10
3.1.3. Market Opportunities for the Construction Industry 13
3.1.3.1. Transport 13
3.1.3.2. Energy/Power 14
3.1.3.3. Water Supply and Treatment 16
3.1.3.4. Healthcare 16
3.1.3.5. Education 18
3.1.3.6. Telecommunications 19
3.1.3.7. Residential Building 20
3.1.3.8. Commercial 21
3.1.3.9. Retail 22
3.1.3.10. Hotels and Tourism 23
3.1.3.11. Mining and Industrial 25
3.2. Continental 27
3.3. International 29
4. INFLUENCING FACTORS 31
4.1. Economic Environment 31
4.1.1. General 31
4.1.2. Effects on the Construction Sector 32
4.2. Socio-Political Environment 32
4.3. Infrastructure Deficit 36
4.3.1. Government Infrastructure Programme Spend 36
4.3.2. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) 37
4.3.3. Private Sector Investment 38
4.4. Urbanisation 38
4.5. Local Content 39
4.6. Corruption 41
4.7. Industry Supply Chain 42
4.7.1. Capacity, Quality and Security of Supply 42
4.8. Industry Specific Issues 43
4.8.1. General Trends 43
4.8.2. Input Costs 43
4.8.3. Cyclicality 44
4.8.4. Health and Safety 44
4.9. Competition 45
4.9.1. Barriers to Entry 45
4.9.2. Public Procurement and the Tendering Process 45
4.10. Labour Resources 46
4.10.1. Training and Skills Development 46
4.10.2. Licensing 46
4.10.3. Skills Shortages 47
4.10.4. Opportunities for Foreign Professionals 47
4.11. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 47
4.12. Environmental Concerns 48
5. SWOT ANALYSIS 50
6. OUTLOOK 51
6.1. Construction Industry Forecast 51
6.2. Macroeconomic Outlook 52
6.3. Political Outlook 52
7. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 53
8. REFERENCES 54
8.1. Publications 54
8.2. Websites 55
COMPANY PROFILES 56
Atlas Development & Support Services Ltd 56
China Jiangxi International Kenya Ltd 59
China Overseas Engineering Group Company Ltd 60
China Wu Yi Company Ltd 61
China Zhongxing Construction Company Ltd 63
Fubeco (China Fushun) Ltd 64
Intex Construction Ltd 65
Kenya Railways Corporation 67
Lee Construction Ltd 69
Moha Kenya Ltd 70
Mulji Devraj & Brothers Ltd 71
National Housing Corporation 72
Njuca Consolidated Company Ltd 74
Oriental Construction Kenya Ltd 75
Parbat Siyani Construction Ltd 77
Prism Construction Company Ltd 78
Spencon Holdings Ltd 79
Victory Construction Company Ltd 81

Introduction

Kenya has a relatively developed building and construction industry with professional engineering, building, and architectural design services available in numbers with healthy competition. This industry is currently experiencing high growth following foreign investment interest specifically from Eastern powers as well as the rehabilitation and reconstruction of the country’s transport infrastructure under the Kenya Urban Transport Infrastructure Programme. The Kenyan population is growing and tending towards urbanisation, which has the effect of growing demand for affordable housing, creating opportunities for construction of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. This report will evaluate factors surrounding the Kenyan construction industry.

Strengths

• A forward-looking, economically-motivated government with sound economic policies.
• A new constitution and a newly enacted legal framework which support free-market economic activities.
• A well-established port in Mombasa.
• Can draw upon and follow Chinese expertise which is prevalent in the country.
• Excellent trade relations with countries in the region.
• Healthy competition exists between construction firms in the sector.
• Sufficient availability of raw material and natural resources in the country.
• The largest economy in East Africa.

Weaknesses

• A relatively inexperienced regulatory body governs the construction industry.
• An entrenched culture of corruption and bribe-taking.
• International perception is weakened by political and military events.
• Lack of technical and artisanal skills available.
• Located in a part of the world that many developed countries still remain sceptical about.
• Long distances between viable locations with poor infrastructure in between.

Opportunities

• Foreign Aid projects by humanitarian organisations in remote parts of the country.
• Kenya’s Vision 2030 will present a significant number of opportunities in the short- and medium-term.
• Konza ‘Silicon Valley’ project.
• The drive for more and better quality education facilities.
• The LAPSSET project will require many capable construction firms to ensure its completion.
• The roll out of low- and medium-cost housing programmes.

Threats

• Bottlenecks in the transport infrastructure.
• Chinese construction firms looking to secure all the major contracts offered in the country.
• Increasing poverty throughout the country.
• Rising input costs in the industry.
• Terrorist activities in and around the country by Al-Qaeda cells.
• The high prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the construction workforce.
• The relative ease of doing business in neighbouring Rwanda.

Outlook

Construction Industry Forecast Market analysts predict continued growth in the Kenyan construction sector based on the last five years of sustained growth. The sector is expected to maintain its growth rate of around 5.5% through 2014. The contribution to the GDP is expected to increase slightly up to the end of 2014, and with good policies, massive projects and sufficient government support the industry is looking to break the 10% contribution to GDP within the next five years. Industry insiders are very positive about the trajectory of the Kenyan construction industry, but are weary of the negative impact of ‘cowboy contractors’ and delays in construction projects granted. The biggest challenge going forward for local players in the Kenyan construction industry is the handling of Chinese firms in the country. Firms that work well with these companies and compel the government to introduce local share schemes for big projects will help propel the local economy. Firms that do not do that will struggle to find enough large-scale business to survive in this highly competitive environment. Macroeconomic Outlook According to the Kenyan Ministry of Devolution and Planning, the macroeconomic stability which was present in 2013 and the first quarter of 2014 is likely to continue for the rest of the year and into the next financial year. Foreign interest, and the increased hands-on approach in assisting the development of African countries, is likely to spur further economic growth. Private consumption is also likely to improve given the lower interest rates, lending rates and a decreased inflation rate. Recent discoveries of petroleum oil and natural gas, as well as improvements in the mining and manufacturing sector, are likely to trigger more foreign direct investment flows. GDP growth is expected to stabilise and be maintained in light of all the positive improvements the country has made. The US recovery will also improve market sentiment and encourage bolder risk-taking in developing economies. The biggest macroeconomic challenge faced by Kenya is the reduction of its trade deficit. Political Outlook According to market commentators, the stabilisation of the political environment in Kenya is expected to be maintained as the country goes through a period of economic growth and sustained peace. The reformation of the regulatory system has inspired confidence in the governing powers and has encouraged more robust participation in the country by foreign powers. The biggest challenge to the Kenyan political situation is the spread of terrorism and terrorist activities in the country. How this is dealt with will determine the political stability of the nation over the short- to medium-term.

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2014

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.43 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2023-12-20

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1044.05 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2020-09-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Construction Industry in Kenya 2017-03-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-06-22

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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The Construction Industry in Kenya 2015-03-09

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. SIZE AND STRUCTURE OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Geographic Position 1
2.2. Key Cities and Regions 1
2.3. Size of the Industry 2
2.3.1. Key Indigenous and Foreign Players 2
3. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
3.1. Local 4
3.1.1. Corporate Actions 5
3.1.2. Regulations 5
3.1.3. Opportunities for the Construction Industry 6
3.1.3.1. Transport 6
3.1.3.2. Energy/Power 7
3.1.3.3. Water Supply and Treatment 8
3.1.3.4. Healthcare 8
3.1.3.5. Education 8
3.1.3.6. Telecommunications 8
3.1.3.7. Residential Building 9
3.1.3.8. Commercial 9
3.1.3.9. Retail 9
3.1.3.10. Hotels and Tourism 10
3.1.3.11. Mining and Industrial 10
3.2. Continental 10
3.3. International 11
4. INFLUENCING FACTORS 12
4.1. Economic Environment 12
4.1.1. General 12
4.1.2. Effects on the Construction Sector 12
4.2. Socio-Political Environment 12
4.3. Infrastructure Deficit 13
4.3.1. Government Infrastructure Programme Spend 13
4.3.2. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) 14
4.3.3. Private Sector Investment 15
4.4. Urbanisation 15
4.5. Local Content 15
4.6. Corruption 15
4.7. Industry Supply Chain 16
4.8. Industry Specific Issues 16
4.8.1. General Trends 16
4.8.2. Input Costs 16
4.8.3. Cyclicality 17
4.8.4. Health and Safety 17
4.9. Competition 17
4.9.1. Barriers to Entry 18
4.9.2. Public Procurement and the Tendering Process 18
4.10. Labour Resources 18
4.10.1. Training and Skills Development 18
4.10.2. Licensing 18
4.10.3. Skills Shortages 18
4.10.4. Opportunities for Foreign Professionals 19
4.11. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 19
4.12. Environmental Concerns 19
5. SWOT ANALYSIS 20
6. OUTLOOK 20
6.1. Construction Industry Forecast 20
6.2. Macroeconomic Outlook 21
6.3. Political Outlook 21
7. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 21
8. REFERENCES 22
8.1. Publications 22
8.2. Websites 22
COMPANY PROFILES 23
CHINA JIANGXI INTERNATIONAL KENYA LTD 23
CHINA OVERSEAS ENGINEERING GROUP COMPANY LTD 24
CHINA WU YI COMPANY LTD 25
CHINA ZHONGXING CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 26
FUBECO (CHINA FUSHUN) LTD 27
INTEX CONSTRUCTION LTD 28
KENYA RAILWAYS CORPORATION 30
LEE CONSTRUCTION LTD 31
MOHA KENYA LTD 32
MULJI DEVRAJ & BROTHERS LTD 33
NATIONAL HOUSING CORPORATION 34
NJUCA CONSOLIDATED COMPANY LTD 35
ORIENTAL CONSTRUCTION KENYA LTD 36
PARBAT SIYANI CONSTRUCTION LTD 37
PRISM CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 38
SPENCON HOLDINGS LTD 39
VICTORY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD 40