Who Owns Whom

Ocean & Coastal Fishing and Aquaculture in South Africa

Carole Veitch | South Africa | 25 October 2021

Ocean & Coastal Fishing and Aquaculture in South Africa

The South African ocean and coastal fishing and aquaculture sector supports food security, provides jobs and is a net exporter of fish and other marine species and an important earner of foreign revenue. Abalone and lobster producers have been hard hit by the pandemic, and while most of the ocean and coastal fishery sectors have been resilient, the industry is feeling the effects of supply chain disruptions and climate change.

Marine Resources

While some fish stocks previously considered overfished, such as hake, have recovered through effective management, others are overfished, or the status of the stocks is unknown. Almost 40% of stocks are of concern. The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment recently published the draft Revised National Biodiversity Framework 2019 to 2024 for the management and protection of species and ecosystems. Areas of significant concern include freshwater ecosystems, rivers and estuaries, with freshwater fish identified as the most vulnerable of all the species.

Fishing Rights

The fishing rights allocation process, which was postponed to the end of December 2021, deals with long-term commercial fishing rights. A key objective is to rebalance fishing quota allocations to empower community-based and small black-owned enterprises. The process has caused some concern that large fishing companies will get reduced allocations and that concerns relating to the rights allocation have discouraged investment.

Report Coverage

This report focuses on ocean and coastal fishing and aquaculture in South Africa. It provides comprehensive information on the state and size of the sector, performance of major players, developments and corporate actions. There is information on the fishing rights allocation process, total allowable catch and quotas and marine resources. The report includes 19 company profiles including major players I&J, Oceana and Sea Harvest and companies involved in the abalone industry such as Wild Coast Abalone and Abagold.

Table of Contents

PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 7
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 14
4.1. Local 14
4.1.1. Trade 24
4.1.2. Corporate Actions 27
4.1.3. Regulations 27
4.1.4. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 30
4.2. Continental 32
4.3. International 36
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 38
5.1. COVID-19 38
5.2. Environmental Concerns 40
5.3. Total Allowable Catch and Quotas 45
5.4. Government Initiatives 46
5.5. Economic Environment 48
5.6. Rising Operating Costs 49
5.7. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 49
5.8. Labour 51
6. COMPETITION 54
6.1. Barriers to Entry 55
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 55
8. OUTLOOK 56
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 57
10. REFERENCES 58
10.1. Publications 58
10.2. Websites 59
APPENDIX 1 60
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APPENDIX 2 - Summary of Notable Players 61
Ocean & Coastal Fishing 61
Fish Hatcheries and Fish Farms 65
COMPANY PROFILES – OCEAN & COASTAL FISHING 68
African Marine Products (Pty) Ltd 68
Impala Fishing (Pty) Ltd 70
Irvin and Johnson Ltd 71
Oceana Group Ltd 75
Pioneer Fishing (West Coast) (Pty) Ltd 81
Premier Fishing SA (Pty) Ltd 83
Sea Harvest Corporation (Pty) Ltd 87
Umsobomvu Fishing (Pty) Ltd 90
COMPANY PROFILES – FISH HATCHERIES & FISH FARMS 92
Abagold Ltd 92
Aqunion (Pty) Ltd 95
Blue Ocean Mussels (Pty) Ltd 97
HIK Abalone Farm (Pty) Ltd 99
Irvin and Johnson Ltd 101
Jacobsbaai Sea Products (Pty) Ltd 105
La Pieus Aqua (Pty) Ltd 107
Premier Fishing SA (Pty) Ltd 109
Viking Aquaculture (Pty) Ltd 113
West Coast Abalone (Pty) Ltd 116
Wild Coast Abalone (Pty) Ltd 118
Zini Fish Farms (Pty) Ltd 120
Zwembesi Farm (Pty) Ltd 121