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cargo handling storage warehousing industry south africa

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2023

Stephen Timm | South Africa | 13 January 2023

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2020

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 08 April 2020

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2018

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 27 September 2018

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2017

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 04 May 2017

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2015

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 19 January 2015

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Report Coverage

This report focuses on the loading and unloading of cargo, irrespective of the transport mode used, and the operation of storage and warehousing facilities for all kinds of goods, but excludes storage facilities operated by companies for their own use. It includes comprehensive information on the size of the sector, state of logistics, supply chains, road and rail transport, and influencing factors such as logistics inefficiencies, power cuts, corruption and crime and the road to rail strategy. There are profiles of 50 companies including Transnet, terminal companies such as Burgan Cape Terminals and the Durban and Richards Bay coal terminals, and operators such as Bidfrieght Port Operations, Supergroup and Value Logistics.

Introduction

• Transnet reported that total cargo invoiced and volumes at its ports declined marginally from January to September 2022.\r\n
• The volume of goods transported by land has increased significantly. \r\n
• South Africa’s ports, roads and rail network face numerous challenges.\r\n
• The deterioration of Transnet’s freight rail system due to rampant crime and lack of maintenance has resulted in a decline in freight taken by rail. \r\n
• Logistics is also affected by corruption, strikes, political unrest and cyberattacks.\r\n
• Concern is growing about Transnet’s continuing failure to address port and rail inefficiencies and reduce its debt. \r\n
• The slowing global and local economy is expected to result in declining volumes of cargo handled at ports.

Strengths

• Globally-competitive multinational companies offering end-to-end integrated supply chain services.
• Innovative systems and trends by the warehousing industry to adapt to complex warehousing operations.
• Low vacancy rates in the warehouse sector reflect the high demand by logistics and distribution companies for premium warehousing space close to ports and airports.

Weaknesses

• As cargo handling, storage and warehousing forms part of the supply chain, disruption to any other part of the chain could affect the industry.
• Current insufficient port and terminal capacity and inefficient port operations.
• High capital investment and operating costs, which are also deterrents to new entrants.
• Lack of locally-registered shipping lines.
• Monopolistic status of the port and aviation industry resulting in inefficiencies and high tariffs and barriers to new entrants.
• Poor co-ordination of and collaboration between road, rail, air and sea transport modes leads to inefficiencies in the supply chain process.
• The business rescue of South African Airways and its subsidiary SA Express.

Opportunities

• Capital investment and acquisition of specialised port handling equipment such as cranes, ship loaders and straddle carriers should improve port efficiency and reduce congestion.
• Government’s investment in special economic zones and revitalisation of business parks may stimulate cargo and warehousing demand, if these zones grow.
• Increase in ecommerce will continue to increase demand for warehousing.
• The African Continental Free Trade Area and Single African Air Transport Marketing agreements will increase connectivity and open up markets on the African continent.
• The opening up of Transnet’s rail and ports to private operators.

Threats

• Corruption and crime.
• Global logistics delays.
• Increasing operational costs such as tyres, freight costs and fuel.
• Loadshedding
• Slowing economic growth globally and locally will reduce trade volumes.
• Strikes, political and social unrest.
• The declining performance of the country’s ports is increasing the attractiveness of neighbouring ports.
• The deterioration of freight rail through lack of maintenance and crime risk has resulted in falling rail volumes.

Outlook

• Cargo volumes handled at South African ports are expected to slow in 2023 as economic growth slows. \r\n
• Grindrod said global markets are affected by inflation and showing low growth through to 2023. \r\n
• Transnet forecast that in the year to end-March 2023, it expected the number of containers and vehicles it handled to increase, bulk freight to grow by over 10% and break-bulk cargo to decline. \r\n
• However these figures may be lower, given downward revisions to economic growth forecasts, a strike and cable theft which have resulted in lower volumes of bulk freight railed from mines. \r\n
• Loadshedding and continuing operational inefficiencies of ports and rail are likely to result in further declines in the country’s logistics competitiveness.

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The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa
The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2023

Full Report

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 6 650.00(ZAR) estimated $ 370.46 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2020-04-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2018-09-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2017-05-04

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2015-01-19

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 6
2.3. Size of the Industry 9
3. LOCAL 11
3.1. State of the Industry 11
3.2. Key Trends 21
3.3. Key Issues 26
3.4. Notable Players 26
3.5. Corporate Actions 27
3.6. Regulations 30
3.7. Enterprise Development and Social Development 35
4. AFRICA 37
5. INTERNATIONAL 42
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 45
6.1. Economic Environment 45
6.2. Labour 46
6.3. Environmental Issues 49
6.4. Technology, R&D, Innovation 51
6.5. Government Initiatives 53
6.6. Input Costs 55
6.7. Logistics Inefficiencies 59
6.8. Electricity Supply Constraints 68
6.9. Corruption, Crime and Unrest 69
6.10. Road to Rail Strategy 73
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 74
7.1. Competition 74
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 76
7.3. Barriers to Entry 77
8. SWOT ANALYSIS 78
9. OUTLOOK 79
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 79
11. REFERENCES 80
11.1. Publications 80
11.2. Websites 81
Appendix 1 83
Summary of Notable Players 83
COMPANY PROFILES 90
African Marine Solutions Group (Pty) Ltd 90
Airlink (Pty) Ltd 93
Aspen Logistic Services (Pty) Ltd 97
Bidfreight Port Operations (Pty) Ltd 99
Bigfoot Express Freight (Pty) Ltd 101
BKB Ltd 103
Bollore Transport and Logistics South Africa (Pty) Ltd 107
Burgan Cape Terminals (RF) (Pty) Ltd 110
Cargo Carriers (Pty) Ltd 112
Commercial Cold Storage (Pty) Ltd 116
DHL Supply Chain (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd 118
Digistics (Pty) Ltd 120
Durban Coal Terminal Company (Pty) Ltd 122
FPT Group (Pty) Ltd 124
Freitan S A (RF) (Pty) Ltd 127
Grindrod Ltd 130
Ibhayi Clearing and Logistics (Pty) Ltd 135
Imperial Logistics Ltd 137
Island View Storage (Pty) Ltd 145
Kuehne and Nagel (Pty) Ltd 147
Logistics Group (Pty) Ltd (The) 149
Lufthansa Cargo AG 151
Manica South Africa (Pty) Ltd 154
Menzies Aviation (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd 156
Namibia Logistics (Pty) Ltd 158
NAS Colossal Aviation Services (Pty) Ltd 160
NWK Ltd 163
Oceanwide Logistics SA (Pty) Ltd 167
OneLogix Group Ltd 169
PCA Logistics (Pty) Ltd 173
Port Stevedoring (Pty) Ltd 175
Richards Bay Coal Terminal (Pty) Ltd 177
RTT Group (Pty) Ltd 180
SACO CFR (Pty) Ltd 184
Safcor Freight (Pty) Ltd 186
SAFreight Logistics (Pty) Ltd 190
Santova Logistics (Pty) Ltd 192
Santova Ltd 194
Solethu Marine Services (Pty) Ltd 197
South Africa Cargo Services (Pty) Ltd 199
South African Airways SOC Ltd 202
South African Bulk Terminals (Pty) Ltd 206
South African Container Depots (Pty) Ltd 208
Super Group Ltd 210
Swissport South Africa (Pty) Ltd 214
Transnet SOC Ltd 217
Unitrans Supply Chain Solutions (Pty) Ltd 222
Value Logistics (Pty) Ltd 225
Vopak Terminal Durban (Pty) Ltd 230
Woods Warehousing (Pty) Ltd 232

Introduction

This report focuses on the loading and unloading of cargo, irrespective of the transport mode used, and the operation of storage and warehousing facilities for all kinds of goods but excludes storage facilities operated by companies for their own use.\r\n\r\nSouth Africa’s cargo handling, storage and warehousing sector forms part of local and global supply chains and is dependent on local and global trade and economic growth to produce goods requiring transportation through its ports and airports to final destinations. The global and local economies and trade are facing headwinds in the form of slow economic growth and the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic. President Cyril Ramaphosa announced a 21-day nationwide lockdown starting from 27 March 2020 to curtail the spread of the virus. The South African Reserve Bank states that the uncertainty created by the potential economic, health and social impact of the outbreak makes it difficult to make any economic growth and activity forecasts. The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) and the International Air Transport Association (Iata) report that the severe impact of the virus on maritime and air cargo operations has not yet been quantified. Transnet National Ports Authority’s total revenue decreased by 3.1% year-on-year in the six months ending September 2019. Total revenue for Transnet Port Terminals increased by 5.9% for the same period with higher volumes for break-bulk and automotive commodity sectors and lower volumes for containers and dry bulk. Ramaphosa has committed to taking action to address congested and inefficient port operations. The Airports Company of South Africa reports that the 477,000 tons of cargo handled by its airports in 2019 represents a year-on-year drop of 5.33%. The local cargo handling, storage and warehousing industry is enveloped by the commission of inquiry into state capture, corruption and fraud in the public sector, including Transnet and national carrier South African Airways (SAA), and the placing of SAA and its subsidiary SA Express into business rescue.

Strengths

• Establishment of the SA Maritime Institute to promote and coordinate maritime education, skills development and research.
• Globally competitive multinational companies offering end-to-end integrated supply chain services.
• Implementation of plans to establish Transnet Port Terminals as one of the top five logistics service providers in the world within five years.
• Innovative systems and trends by the warehousing industry to adapt to complex warehousing operations.
• Low vacancy rates in the warehouse sector reflect the high demand by logistics and distribution companies for premium warehousing space close to ports and airports.

Weaknesses

• As cargo handling, storage and warehousing forms part of the supply chain, disruption to any other part of the chain could impact on this sector.
• Commission of inquiry to investigate allegations of state, capture, corruption and fraud in the public sector, including Transnet and South African Airways.
• Current insufficient port and terminal capacity and inefficient port operations.
• High capital investment and operating costs, which are also deterrents to new entrants.
• Lack of locally registered shipping lines.
• Monopolistic status of the port and aviation industry resulting in inefficiencies and high tariffs and barriers to new entrants.
• Poor co-ordination of and collaboration between road, rail, air and sea transport modes leads to inefficiencies in the supply chain process.
• The business rescue of South African Airways and its subsidiary SA Express.

Opportunities

• Capital investment and acquisition of specialised port handling equipment such as cranes, ship loaders and straddle carriers should improve port efficiency and reduce congestion.
• Increase in e-commerce will increase demand for warehousing.
• Operation Phakisa: Oceans Economy to unlock the potential of South Africa’s oceans.
• Proposed Maritime Transport Policy to unlock the maritime sector’s full potential and enhance its contribution to the socio-economic development objectives of the country, while contributing to international trade.
• The African Continental Free Trade Area and Single African Air Transport Marketing agreements will increase connectivity and open up markets on the African continent.

Threats

• Development of port and airport infrastructure on the African continent could lead to goods being diverted away from South African ports and airports.
• High crime rate increases security and insurance costs, thereby affecting global competitiveness.
• High exposure to delays and restrictions caused by unreliable electricity supply, adverse weather conditions, natural disasters, labour action and traffic congestion.
• Impact of weak, volatile and unpredictable rand on fuel price and cost of imported materials-handling equipment, automation systems, and IT and security systems
• Increase in debt servicing costs could reduce the amount of finance available for infrastructure development.
• Reduced government spending on large scale infrastructure projects will result in lower volumes of high value imported materials, equipment and machinery requiring handling and storage.
• The severe impact of the coronavirus pandemic and associated control measures on global and local economies, trade and transportation of air and marine cargo has yet to be quantified.
• Weak economic growth, volatile rand, political uncertainty and credit ratings downgrades will lead to slowdown in manufacturing, mining and agricultural output, thereby reducing the volume of cargo requiring handling storage and warehousing
• World Bank Commodity Markets Outlook reports of slowdown in global commodity demand could negatively affect commodity price prospects and the future growth of commodity-exporting countries.

Outlook

The cargo handling, storage and warehousing sector is part of the supply chain process and is dependent on other components in the supply chain. SAPICS, the professional body for supply chain management, emphasises that this is the time for supply chain professionals to step up and demonstrate how supply chain management keeps goods moving around the world, even in the midst of a global pandemic. This is confirmed by DSV’s Mungo Park who foresees an important role for supply chain professionals and service providers to play in the normalisation of logistics operations and services once the situation begins to stabilise. “Recovery plans will need to be put in place quickly to address the huge backlog of unfulfilled shipments and deliveries. This will be an opportunity for the profession to demonstrate the value that it has to offer in the recovery of economies and the rehabilitation of logistics operations.”\r\n\r\nJohn Gattorna, international supply chain expert, said that “the future will belong to those enterprises with supply chains that can deliver reliably under all operating conditions, rather than those with simply great marketing, good products and extensive sales forces”. He said survival of disruptions like coronavirus requires flexible and dynamic supply chain configurations that can “service a large part of our target market under both stable and extremely disruptive conditions and cater for customers who change their normal buying behaviours because of the changing situation they find themselves in”. \r\n\r\nComments by Glen Steyn, of the Western Cape’s Ease of Doing Business task team, about the port of Cape Town, are applicable to all ports in South Africa. “It is not just the port that has to change and raise the bar, but rather every single cog in the logistics chain has to work on improving efficiency. It does not matter if it is the truck driver, an official in government, a planner at a shipping line or the owner of a freight forwarding company. If everyone raises the bar as a collective, we will improve the efficiency of the port.”

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa
The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2020

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2023-01-13

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2018-09-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2017-05-04

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2015-01-19

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4.1. Local 9
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 15
4.1.2. Regulations 19
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Socio-Economic Development 25
4.2. Continental 27
4.3. International 31
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 34
5.1. Economic Environment 34
5.2. Coronavirus 37
5.3. Operating Costs 41
5.4. Operational Issues at Cape Town and Durban Ports 44
5.5. Port Infrastructure and Related Developments 46
5.6. Airport Infrastructure Development 51
5.7. Government Initiatives 52
5.8. Private Sector Initiatives 54
5.9. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 55
5.10. Risk Management 57
5.11. Labour 59
5.12. Cyclicality 63
5.13. Environmental Issues 64
5.14. Electricity Supply Constraints 66
6. COMPETITION 67
6.1. Barriers to Entry 69
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 70
8. OUTLOOK 72
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 73
10. REFERENCES 74
10.1. Publications 74
10.2. Websites 76
APPENDIX 1 77
Summary of Notable Players 77
APPENDIX 2 85
Agility Emerging Markets Logistics Index 2020 85
APPENDIX 3 86
Current and Future Projects on the African Continent in the Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry: September 2018 to March 2020 86
COMPANY PROFILES 93
AFRICAN MARINE SOLUTIONS GROUP (PTY) LTD 93
BARLOWORLD LOGISTICS AFRICA (PTY) LTD 95
BARLOWORLD TRANSPORT (PTY) LTD 98
BIDAIR SERVICES (PTY) LTD 101
BIDFREIGHT PORT OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 104
BIGFOOT EXPRESS FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 106
BKB LTD 108
BOLLORE TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 112
BURGAN CAPE TERMINALS (RF) (PTY) LTD 115
CARGO CARRIERS (PTY) LTD 117
CFR FREIGHT SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 121
COMMERCIAL COLD STORAGE (PTY) LTD 123
DHL SUPPLY CHAIN (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 125
DIGISTICS (PTY) LTD 127
DISTRIBUTION AND WAREHOUSING NETWORK (PTY) LTD 129
DURBAN COAL TERMINAL COMPANY (PTY) LTD 131
FPT GROUP (PTY) LTD 133
FREITAN S A (RF) (PTY) LTD 136
GRINDROD LTD 138
IBHAYI CLEARING AND LOGISTICS CC 142
IMPERIAL LOGISTICS LTD 144
ISLAND VIEW STORAGE (PTY) LTD 153
KUEHNE AND NAGEL (PTY) LTD 155
LOGISTICS GROUP (PTY) LTD (THE) 157
LONRHO LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 159
LUFTHANSA CARGO AG 162
MANICA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 164
MENZIES AVIATION (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 166
NAMIBIA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 168
NWK LTD 170
OCEANWIDE LOGISTICS SA (PTY) LTD 174
ONELOGIX GROUP LTD 176
PORT STEVEDORING (PTY) LTD 179
RICHARDS BAY COAL TERMINAL (PTY) LTD 181
RTT GROUP (PTY) LTD 184
SA AIRLINK (PTY) LTD 187
SAFCOR FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 191
SAFREIGHT LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 194
SANTOVA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 196
SANTOVA LTD 198
SOLETHU MARINE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 201
SOUTH AFRICA CARGO SERVICES (PTY) LTD 203
SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SOC) LTD 206
SOUTH AFRICAN BULK TERMINALS (PTY) LTD 210
SOUTH AFRICAN CONTAINER DEPOTS (PTY) LTD 212
SUPER GROUP LTD 214
SWISSPORT SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 218
TRANSNET SOC LTD 221
UNITRANS SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 226
VALUE LOGISTICS LTD 229
VOPAK TERMINAL DURBAN (PTY) LTD 233
WOODS WAREHOUSING (PTY) LTD 235

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the loading and unloading of cargo, irrespective of the transport mode used, and the operation of storage and warehousing facilities for all kinds of goods, but excludes storage facilities operated by companies for their own use. It examines current conditions and discusses the issues, difficulties and opportunities facing the sector. Also covered are regulatory developments and initiatives by government and local companies. The report profiles 51 companies including local subsidiaries of multinationals such as Santova Logistics, local companies operating internationally such as Barloworld and Grindrod and several state-owned enterprises which dominate the sector such as Transnet and SAA.

Introduction

As part of the end-to-end supply logistics supply chain, the status of the South African cargo handling, warehousing and storage industry is subject to local and international factors which influence the flow of goods moving through our ports and airports to final destinations. The possibility of trade wars may affect the 2018 global trade growth forecast of 4.3%, and demand for commodities is expected to slow down. South African exports for the seven months ending July 2018 increased by 3.6% while imports for the same period increased by 10.2%. Although Transnet reported an increase in freight volumes through ports during the 2017/18 financial year, it believed its future growth depends on its ability to increase efficiency, provide value-added services, diversify revenue streams and implement geographic expansionary projects on the African continent. Low economic growth, the volatile currency, poor investor confidence and credit rating downgrades will have a negative effect on the volume and value of goods requiring handling, storage and warehousing. The local industry is currently also overshadowed by the Commission of Inquiry into state capture, corruption and fraud in the public sector, including Transnet and national carrier South African Airways (SAA), as well as the uncertain financial situation at SAA, which recorded a decrease in cargo volumes during the 2016/17 year.

Strengths

• Establishment of the SA Maritime Institute to promote and coordinate maritime education, skills development and research.
• Globally competitive multinational companies offering end-to-end integrated total supply chain services.
• Implementation of plans to establish TPT as one of the top five logistics service providers in the world within five years.
• Innovative systems and trends by the warehousing industry to adapt to the more complex warehousing operations.
• Low vacancy rates in the warehouse sector reflect the high demand by logistics and distribution companies for premium warehousing space close to ports and airports.

Weaknesses

• Commission of Inquiry to investigate allegations of state, capture, corruption and fraud in the public sector, including Transnet and South African Airways.
• Current insufficient port and terminal capacity.
• Lack of locally registered shipping lines.
• Monopolistic status of the port and aviation industry resulting in inefficiencies and high tariffs.

Opportunities

• Acquisition of specialised port handling equipment such as cranes, ship loaders and straddle carriers should improve port efficiency and reduce congestion.
• Anticipated moderate growth in global trade and potential for growth in Africa’s air cargo market.
• Increase in e-commerce will increase demand for warehousing.
• Operation Phakisa: Oceans Economy to unlock the potential of South Africa’s oceans.
• Proposed Maritime Transport Policy to unlock the maritime sector’s full potential and enhance its contribution to the socio-economic development objectives of the country, while contributing to international trade.

Threats

• Development of port and airport infrastructure on the African continent could lead to goods being diverted away from South African ports and airports
• High crime rate increases security and insurance costs, thereby affecting global competitiveness.
• Impact of weak, volatile and unpredictable South African rand on fuel price and cost of imported materials-handling equipment, automation systems, and IT and security systems
• Increase in debt servicing costs could reduce the amount of finance available for infrastructure development
• Lowering of projected growth rates will lead to slowdown in manufacturing, mining and agricultural output, thereby reducing the volume of cargo requiring warehousing and handling.
• Negative impact on volumes of high value imported materials, equipment and machinery caused by reduced government expenditure on large-scale infrastructure projects.
• Potential Impact of volatile rand, political uncertainty and credit ratings downgrades on economic growth, thereby reducing the volume of goods requiring handling, storage and warehousing.
• Potential negative impact of Brexit and possible cancellation of AGOA on South African exports.
• World Bank Commodity Markets Outlook forecast of slowdown in global commodity demand could negatively affect commodity price prospects and the future growth of commodity-exporting countries .

Outlook

Global Transport and Logistics CEOs participating in the PwC 2018 survey anticipate a stronger growth phase in contrast with previous forecasts. The main threats to growth and profitability include terrorism; volatile fuel prices; cyber threats; the shortage of key skills and digital talent; the speed of technological change; political instability and supply chain disruption. CEOs also identify environmental damage and climate change as significant threats to growth, not only due to the disrupting effect of increasing climate volatility, but also from mounting pressure from stakeholders and customers to reduce the environmental impact of their operations. Diverse political and economic systems and regulatory regimes add significant complexity to cross-border operations. These threats are also relevant for the South African cargo handling, storage and warehousing sector.\r\n\r\nPwC’s Shaw said that “automation, robotics, self-driving vehicles, telematics and the digitisation of supply chains are beginning to reshape the logistics sector. Digitisation creates a common platform with opportunities for increasing collaboration between customers, logistics providers and suppliers.”\r\n\r\nSAPICS’ Park identifies the trends facing the supply chain sector as leveraging of technology systems and the data generated; increasing application of blockchain; establishment of strong long-term partnerships and information sharing between all participants; flexibility to adapt to the growth of e-commerce; elimination of waste through inventory reduction; pro-active risk management; and resilience through alternative sources of supply and service providers.\r\n\r\nTPT’s Sithole plans to transform TPT into one of the top five global logistics service providers within the next five years. “We want to move from being a pure terminal operator to a facilities operator. We will talk to the shipping line as well as the cargo owner. We will provide the inland facilities. We will provide the value-added services so that we firmly occupy the space of being a logistics service provider. We will offer terminals as a service using the digital tools and rich data that we have at our disposal to really start connecting suppliers and traders and customers irrespective of where they find themselves in the world”.

Read More..
The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa
The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2018

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2023-01-13

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2020-04-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2017-05-04

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2015-01-19

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4.1. Local 8
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 16
4.1.2. Regulations 18
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 23
4.2. Continental 26
4.3. International 33
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 37
5.1. Comprehensive Maritime Transport Policy 37
5.2. White Paper on National Civil Aviation Policy 38
5.3. Economic Environment 38
5.4. Rising Operating Costs 42
5.5. Port Infrastructure Development 43
5.6. Airport Infrastructure Development 48
5.7. Government and Private Sector Initiatives 49
5.8. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 51
5.9. Risk Management and Security 55
5.10. Labour 56
5.11. Cyclicality 59
5.12. Environmental Issues 60
6. COMPETITION 61
6.1. Barriers to Entry 64
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 65
8. OUTLOOK 66
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 67
10. REFERENCES 69
10.1. Publications 69
10.2. Websites 71
APPENDIX 1 73
Summary of Major Players 73
APPENDIX 2 81
Agility Emerging Markets Logistics Index: Sub-Indices 81
APPENDIX 3 82
Current and Future Projects on the African Continent to Create Opportunities for Growth in the Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry: May 2017 to August 2018 82
COMPANY PROFILES 88
AFRICAN MARINE SOLUTIONS GROUP (PTY) LTD 88
BARLOWORLD LOGISTICS AFRICA (PTY) LTD 90
BARLOWORLD TRANSPORT (PTY) LTD 93
BIDAIR SERVICES (PTY) LTD 96
BIDFREIGHT PORT OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 99
BIGFOOT EXPRESS FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 101
BKB LTD 103
BOLLORE TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 107
BURGAN CAPE TERMINALS (RF) (PTY) LTD 110
CAPESPAN GROUP LTD 112
CARGO CARRIERS LTD 115
CFR FREIGHT (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 119
COMMERCIAL COLD STORAGE (PTY) LTD 121
DHL SUPPLY CHAIN (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 123
DIGISTICS (PTY) LTD 125
DISTRIBUTION AND WAREHOUSING NETWORK LTD 127
DURBAN COAL TERMINAL COMPANY (PTY) LTD 130
FPT GROUP (PTY) LTD 132
FREITAN S A (RF) (PTY) LTD 135
GRINDROD LTD 137
IBHAYI CLEARING AND LOGISTICS CC 141
IMPERIAL LOGISTICS (DIVISION OF IMPERIAL HOLDINGS LTD) 143
ISLAND VIEW STORAGE (PTY) LTD 146
KUEHNE AND NAGEL (PTY) LTD 148
LONRHO LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 150
LUFTHANSA CARGO AG 153
MANICA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 156
MENZIES AVIATION (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 159
NAMIBIA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 161
NWK LTD 163
OCEANWIDE LOGISTICS SA (PTY) LTD 167
ONELOGIX GROUP LTD 169
PORT SERVICES (PTY) LTD 172
RTT GROUP (PTY) LTD 174
SA AIRLINK (PTY) LTD 177
SAFCOR FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 180
SAFREIGHT LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 183
SANTOVA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 185
SANTOVA LTD 187
SOLETHU MARINE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 191
SOUTH AFRICA CARGO SERVICES (PTY) LTD 193
SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SOC) LTD 196
SOUTH AFRICAN BULK TERMINALS (PTY) LTD 200
SOUTH AFRICAN CONTAINER DEPOTS (PTY) LTD 202
SUPER GROUP LTD 204
SWISSPORT SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 208
TRANSNET SOC LTD 211
UNITRANS SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 215
VALUE LOGISTICS LTD 218
VOPAK TERMINAL DURBAN (PTY) LTD 222
WOODS WAREHOUSING (PTY) LTD 224

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the loading and unloading of cargo, irrespective of the transport mode used, and the operation of storage and warehousing facilities for all kinds of goods, but excludes storage facilities operated by companies for their own use. It examines current conditions and discusses the issues, difficulties and opportunities facing the sector. Also covered are regulatory developments and initiatives by local companies to expand their footprint on the continent. The report profiles 55 companies including local subsidiaries of multinational companies that offer entire global supply chain and logistics services such as Santova Logistics (Pty) Ltd and local companies like Woods Warehousing (Pty) Ltd that specialise in bonded and duty paid warehousing.

Introduction

This report focuses on the loading and unloading of cargo, irrespective of the transport mode used, and the operation of storage and warehousing facilities for all kinds of goods, but excludes storage facilities operated by companies for their own use. Although the World Trade Organisation (WTO) predicted an increase in the flow of goods to be handled by the global cargo handling, storage and warehousing industry, the impact of the volatile rand, political uncertainty and credit rating downgrades of both South Africa and Transnet, could result in a further decrease in the movement of freight locally. 2016 was a difficult year for Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA), which reported a year-on-year drop of 4.7% in the amount of cargo transported by sea, and SAA Cargo which reported a decrease of 17,000 tonnes in the amount of air freight handled in the 2015/2016 financial year.

Strengths

• Establishment of the SA Maritime Institute to promote and coordinate maritime education, skills development and research.
• Globally competitive multinational companies offering end-to-end integrated total supply chain services.
• Innovative systems and trends implemented by the sector.
• There is premium warehousing space close to ports and airports.

Weaknesses

• Current insufficient port and terminal capacity.
• Lack of locally registered shipping lines.
• Monopolistic status of the port and aviation industry resulting in inefficiencies and high tariffs costs.

Opportunities

• Acquisition of specialised port handling equipment as part of the Transnet MDS such as cranes, ship loaders and straddle carriers should improve port efficiency and reduce congestion.
• Anticipated increased output resulting from government initiatives should increase the flow of goods requiring warehousing and cargo handling for export.
• Anticipated moderate growth in global trade and potential for growth in Africa’s air cargo market.
• Increase in e-commerce will increase demand for warehousing.
• Infrastructure and capital expansion projects in South Africa should provide opportunities for handling and storage of imported machinery and equipment.
• Operation Phakisa: Oceans Economy to unlock the potential of South Africa’s oceans.
• Projected capital investment of R8.2bn in the automotive sector for 2017.
• Proposed Maritime Transport Policy to unlock the maritime sector’s full potential and enhance its contribution to the socio economic development objectives of the country, while contributing to international trade.
• World Bank Commodity Markets Outlook forecast of gradually increasing prices for 2017.

Threats

• Continuing high crime rate which increases security and insurance costs, thereby affecting global competitiveness.
• Development of port infrastructure on the African continent could lead to goods being diverted away from South African ports.
• Lowering of projected growth rates will lead to slowdown in manufacturing, mining and agricultural output, thereby reducing the volume of cargo requiring warehousing and handling.
• Potential impact of volatile rand, political uncertainty and credit ratings downgrades on economic growth, thereby reducing the volume of goods requiring handling, storage and warehousing, and negatively impacting the fuel price and imported equipment.

Outlook

Stakeholders recognise that the market environment is changing dramatically due to a shift in global economic power and an increase in trade between emerging countries. Technology stands out as both a force causing change and a way to manage it. Defining, managing and measuring risk is also a top priority. Musa Zwane, Acting CEO of SAA emphasised that while IATA has identified Africa as the fastest-growing air cargo region globally, catalysts like technology need to be embraced in order to reach this potential. “Africa’s air cargo market has a golden opportunity, but while the potential for growth is high, the value proposition for customers must be examined and improved.”\r\n\r\nThe World Trade Organisation (WTO) forecasts that, depending on economic growth and policy developments, global trade will expand within a range of 1.8% to 3.6% in 2017, and by between 2.1% and 4% in 2018. Although trade-related indicators including air freight, automobile sales, export orders and container shipping should contribute towards increasing the flow of goods to be handled by the cargo handling, storage and warehousing industry, the full impact of the volatile rand and the South African and Transnet credit ratings downgrades remains uncertain.

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The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa
The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2023-01-13

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2020-04-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2018-09-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2015-01-19

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 17
4.1. Local 17
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 25
4.1.2. Regulations 29
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 35
4.2. Continental 37
4.3. International 42
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 47
5.1. Economic Environment 47
5.2. Government and Private Sector Initiatives 49
5.3. Rising Operating Costs 50
5.4. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 52
5.5. Risk Management and Security 54
5.6. Labour 55
5.7. Cyclicality 57
5.8. Environmental Concerns 58
6. COMPETITION 60
6.1. Barriers to Entry 61
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 62
8. OUTLOOK 64
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 64
10. REFERENCES 66
10.1. Publications 66
10.2. Websites 68
APPENDIX 1 70
Agility Emerging Markets Logistics Index Sub-Indices 70
APPENDIX 2 71
Projects on the African Continent to Create Opportunities for Growth in the Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry 71
COMPANY PROFILES 77
AFRICAN MARINE SOLUTIONS GROUP (PTY) LTD 77
BARLOWORLD LOGISTICS AFRICA (PTY) LTD 79
BARLOWORLD TRANSPORT (PTY) LTD 82
BIDAIR SERVICES (PTY) LTD 85
BIDFREIGHT PORT OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 88
BIGFOOT EXPRESS FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 90
BKB LTD 92
BOLLORE TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 96
BURGAN CAPE TERMINALS (RF) (PTY) LTD 98
CAPESPAN GROUP LTD 100
CARGO CARRIERS LTD 104
CFR FREIGHT (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 109
COMMERCIAL COLD STORAGE (PTY) LTD 111
DHL SUPPLY CHAIN (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 113
DIGISTICS (PTY) LTD 115
DISTRIBUTION AND WAREHOUSING NETWORK LTD 117
DURBAN COAL TERMINAL COMPANY (PTY) LTD 120
FPT GROUP (PTY) LTD 122
FREITAN S A (RF) (PTY) LTD 125
GOLDFIELDS LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 127
GREYSTONES CARGO SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 130
GRINDROD (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 132
IBHAYI CLEARING AND LOGISTICS CC 135
IMPERIAL COLD LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 137
IMPERIAL LOGISTICS (DIVISION OF IMPERIAL GROUP LTD) 139
IMPERIAL RETAIL LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 141
ISLAND VIEW STORAGE (PTY) LTD 143
KUEHNE AND NAGEL (PTY) LTD 145
LONRHO LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 147
LUFTHANSA CARGO AG 150
MANICA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 153
MENZIES AVIATION (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 156
NAMIBIA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 158
NWK LTD 160
OCEANWIDE LOGISTICS SA (PTY) LTD 166
ONELOGIX GROUP LTD 168
PORT SERVICES (PTY) LTD 171
RTT GROUP (PTY) LTD 173
SA AIRLINK (PTY) LTD 175
SAFCOR FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 178
SAFREIGHT LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 181
SANTOVA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 183
SANTOVA LTD 185
SOLETHU MARINE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 188
SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SOC) LTD 190
SOUTH AFRICAN BULK TERMINALS (PTY) LTD 194
SOUTH AFRICAN CONTAINER DEPOTS (PTY) LTD 196
SUPER GROUP LTD 198
SWISSPORT SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 202
TRANSNET SOC LTD 205
UNITRANS HOUSEHOLD GOODS LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 210
UNITRANS SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 212
VALUE LOGISTICS LTD 215
VOPAK TERMINAL DURBAN (PTY) LTD 220
WOODS WAREHOUSING (PTY) LTD 222

Introduction

This report focuses on the loading and unloading of cargo irrespective of the transport mode used, and the operation of storage and warehousing facilities for all kinds of goods, but excludes storage facilities operated by companies for their own use. \r\n\r\nGDP and world trade determine the growth of the transport and logistics industry and thereby impact on the volume of cargo requiring transportation and storage. According to the October 2014 FNB South African Sector Quarterly, “Growth in the transport industry typically mirrors broader economic growth as it is very strongly correlated to overall GDP given its broad reach throughout the economy.” Using Transnet National Ports Authority and SAA Cargo annual statistics as a basis, the South African industry stored and handled 213,159 million tonnes of cargo by sea for the year ending March 2014 and 132,866 tonnes by air for the year ending March 2013.

Strengths

• Establishment of the SA Maritime Institute to promote and coordinate maritime education, skills development and research.
• Globally competitive multinational companies offering end-to-end integrated total supply chain services.
• Innovative systems and trends by the warehousing industry to adapt to the more complex warehousing operations.
• Low vacancy rates in the warehouse sector reflect the high demand by logistics and distribution companies for premium warehousing space close to ports and airports.

Weaknesses

• Current insufficient port and terminal capacity.
• Lack of locally registered shipping lines.
• Monopolistic status of the port and aviation industry resulting in inefficiencies and high tariffs costs.

Opportunities

• Acquisition of specialised port handling equipment as part of the Transnet MDS such as cranes, ship loaders and straddle carriers should improve port efficiency and reduce congestion.
• Anticipated increased output resulting from government initiatives should increase the flow of goods requiring warehousing and cargo handling for export.
• Increase in e-commerce will increase demand for warehousing.
• Infrastructure and capital expansion projects in South Africa should provide opportunities for handling and storage of imported machinery and equipment.

Threats

• Development of port infrastructure on the African continent could lead to goods being diverted away from South African ports.
• Lowering of projected growth rates will lead to slowdown in manufacturing, mining and agricultural output, thereby reducing the volume of cargo requiring warehousing and handling.

Outlook

Global T&L CEOs participating in the PwC 17th Annual Survey emphasised that the interplay of five trends will transform each component of the supply chain process, including cargo handling, storage and warehousing, in the coming five years: technological advances; demographic fluctuations in trade patterns; global shifts in economic power; urbanisation; and climate change.\r\n\r\nAs almost two-thirds of domestic transport demand stems from the mining, manufacturing and household sectors, the FNB South African Sector Quarterly forecasts that the weakness in the production side of the economy and slowing household consumption will result in South African freight volumes remaining under pressure into 2015. However, the implementation of the government infrastructure initiatives and manufacturing incentives and the Transnet Market Demand Strategy is expected to unlock economic potential and streamline logistics processes, thereby increasing production and trade. FNB Global Economics Analysis of 21 July 2014 reports that a closer look at South Africa’s top export destinations confirms that the country has the opportunity to accelerate export growth as economic growth in the major trading partners is likely to expand over the short to medium term. All these factors should increase the flow of goods to be handled by the cargo handling, storage and warehousing industry.

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa
The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2015

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2023-01-13

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2020-04-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2018-09-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry in South Africa 2017-05-04

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Supply Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4.1. Local 9
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 12
4.1.2. Regulations & Government Programmes 14
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 17
4.2. Continental 20
4.3. International 24
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
5.1. Economic Environment 28
5.2. Government and Transnet Initiatives 29
5.3. Rising Operating Costs 30
5.4. Information Technology 31
5.5. Risk Management and Security 32
5.6. Labour 32
5.6.1. General 32
5.6.2. Unions 33
5.6.3. Skills Development and Training 33
5.7. Cyclicality 34
5.8. Environmental Concerns 35
6. COMPETITION 36
6.1. Barriers to Entry 36
6.2. Technology 37
6.3. Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 38
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 39
8. OUTLOOK 39
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 40
10. REFERENCES 41
10.1. Publications 41
10.2. Websites 42
APPENDIX 1 43
Agility Emerging Markets Logistics Index 2014 43
APPENDIX 2 45
Projects on the African Continent to Create Opportunities for Growth in the Cargo Handling, Storage and Warehousing Industry 45
APPENDIX 3 47
Transport Education and Training Authority: Freight Handling Sector Scarce Skills (Occupations in Demand) 47
ORGANOGRAM 74110 49
Cargo Handling 49
COMPANY PROFILES 51
BARLOWORLD TRANSPORT (PTY) LTD 51
BIDFREIGHT PORT OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 53
CARGO CARRIERS LTD 55
DP WORLD CARGO SERVICES (PTY) LTD 59
DURBAN COAL TERMINAL COMPANY (PTY) LTD 61
EXPRESS AIR SERVICES (PTY) LTD 62
FREITAN SA (PTY) LTD 64
GREYSTONES CARGO SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 66
GRINDROD (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 68
IBHAYI CLEARING & LOGISTICS CC 71
LUFTHANSA CARGO AG 72
MENZIES AVIATION (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 74
ONELOGIX GROUP LTD 76
PORT SERVICES (PTY) LTD 79
SAFREIGHT LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 80
SANTOVA LTD 82
SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SOC) LTD 85
SUPER GROUP LTD 89
SWISSPORT SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 92
TRANSNET SOC LTD 94
ORGANOGRAM 74120 97
Storage and Warehousing 97
COMPANY PROFILES 100
BARLOWORLD LOGISTICS AFRICA (PTY) LTD 100
BARLOWORLD TRANSPORT (PTY) LTD 102
BIDFREIGHT PORT OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 104
BIGFOOT EXPRESS FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 106
BKB LTD 107
COMMERCIAL COLD STORAGE (PTY) LTD 110
DHL SUPPLY CHAIN (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 112
DIGISTICS (PTY) LTD 114
DURBAN COAL TERMINAL COMPANY (PTY) LTD 116
FREIGHTMAX (PTY) LTD 117
GOLDFIELDS LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 119
GRINDROD (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 121
IBHAYI CLEARING & LOGISTICS CC 124
IMPERIAL COLD LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 125
IMPERIAL GROUP LTD 127
IMPERIAL RETAIL LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 131
ISLAND VIEW STORAGE (PTY) LTD 133
KUEHNE & NAGEL (PTY) LTD 135
MANICA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 137
NAMIBIA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 139
NWK HOLDINGS LTD 140
ONELOGIX GROUP LTD 142
PE COLD STORAGE (PTY) LTD 145
RTT GROUP (PTY) LTD 146
SAFCOR FREIGHT (PTY) LTD 149
SANTOVA LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 151
SANTOVA LTD 152
SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SOC) LTD 155
SOUTH AFRICAN BULK TERMINALS LTD 159
SOUTH AFRICAN CONTAINER DEPOTS (PTY) LTD 160
TRENCOR LTD 162
TRUCKAFRICA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 164
UNITRANS HOUSEHOLD GOODS LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 166
UNITRANS SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 167
VALUE LOGISTICS LTD 171
VOPAK TERMINAL DURBAN (PTY) LTD 173
WOODS WAREHOUSING (PTY) LTD 175
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