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collection, purification, testing distribution water south africa

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2023

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 28 November 2023

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Report coverage

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the collection, distribution and purification of water to household, agricultural, industrial, commercial and other users. Water testing laboratories are also covered. It includes information on municipalities, water boards and catchment management agencies, water use per industrial sector, access to water, infrastructure development, maintenance and problems, notable players and corporate actions. There are 32 company profiles which include water boards such as Rand Water, Amatola, Lepelle and Gamtoos, bulk water infrastructure provider Trans Caledon Tunnel Authority and testing labs such as Waterlab and Michrochem Lab Services.

Report coverage

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the collection, distribution and purification of water to household, agricultural, industrial, commercial and other users. Water testing laboratories are also covered. It includes information on municipalities, water boards and catchment management agencies, water use per industrial sector, access to water, infrastructure development, maintenance and problems, notable players and corporate actions. There are 32 company profiles which include water boards such as Rand Water, Amatola, Lepelle and Gamtoos, bulk water infrastructure provider Trans Caledon Tunnel Authority and testing labs such as Waterlab and Michrochem Lab Services.

Introduction

• Government has identified water provision, management and the state of wastewater systems as one of the most pressing issues facing South Africa.
• Poor water management has led to polluted water sources and limited access to clean water.
• Water is ranked as the second highest risk for business activities after energy.
• Water and sanitation challenges have social, economic, and environmental implications.
• While access to water services is growing, the services being provided are not reliable, with major disruptions to the provision of piped water to households.
• Challenges affecting water provision include population growth, increasing economic activity and climate change, exacerbated by underperforming local governments.
• A significant number of households still use pit latrines and bucket toilets and some have no toilet facilities.

Trends

• Decentralised modular and mobile water and wastewater systems.
• Diversification of the water resource mix to have less reliance on surface water.
• Move towards non-sewered sanitation systems.
• Public private partnerships for infrastructure projects.
• Stronger local and international partnerships and stakeholder engagement.

Opportunities

• Allocation of over R14bn in 2023/24 to municipalities to address water infrastructure backlogs.
• Amalgamation of Water Trading Entity and Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority to form National Water Resources infrastructure Agency.
• DWS ‘s Hydropower Independent Producer Programme to use water infrastructure and water courses for renewable energy.
• Establishment of the Water Partnership Office to support municipalities to partner with the private sector to accelerate water and sanitation infrastructure delivery.
• Implementation of DWS turnaround plan.
• Opportunities for SMEs in decentralised modular and mobile water and wastewater systems and non-sewered sanitation.
• Reconfiguration of water boards
• The Water Research Commission’s call for new research project proposals.

Challenges

• Continued decline in quality and reliability of water supply systems in small towns and rural areas.
• High levels of deteriorating water quality caused by infrastructure failure.
• High unauthorised, irregular fruitless and wasteful expenditure by water boards.
• Inadequate spending on repair, maintenance, rehabilitation and expansion of water supply systems.
• Infrastructure damage due to increased theft, vandalism and service delivery protests diverts funding from maintenance, refurbishment and expansion budgets.
• Non-revenue water and non-payment for water services.
• Water supply systems operated at full capacity will not be able to meet growing demand unless measures are taken to decrease consumption and expedite delayed bulk water projects.

Outlook

• South Africa needs to move from developing and talking about strategies and plans to actual implementation, according to an industry expert.
• Local authorities should investigate more public-private partnerships to guarantee water supply to residents.
• Water demands of the economic sectors (energy, mining and agriculture), increasing urbanisation and industrialisation place enormous pressure on the country’s scarce water resource.
• The industry needs to find new ways to reduce water demand and increase availability.
• There is systemic collapse of water delivery systems in some cities and forecasts are not positive.

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The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2023

Full Report

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1046.15 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 14 000.00(ZAR) estimated $ 732.30 (USD)*

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 5
2.3. Size of the Industry 8
3. LOCAL 13
3.1. State of the Industry 13
3.2. Key Trends 24
3.2. Key Issues 24
3.3. Notable Players 25
3.4. Corporate Actions 29
3.5. Regulations 30
3.6. Enterprise Development and Social Development 32
4. AFRICA 34
5. INTERNATIONAL 37
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 40
6.1. Unforeseen Events 40
6.2. Economic Environment 40
6.3. Labour 41
6.4. Governance and Procurement Issues 44
6.5. Government Initiatives 46
6.6. Investment in Infrastructure 48
6.7. Environmental Issues 48
6.8. Water Quality: Blue and Green Drop Reports 49
6.9. Technology, R&D, Innovation 51
6.10. Electricity Supply Constraints 53
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 54
7.1. Competition 54
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 54
7.3. Barriers to Entry 55
8. INDUSTRY SUMMARY 55
9. OUTLOOK 56
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 57
11. REFERENCES 57
11.1. Publications 57
11.2. Websites 59
APPENDICES 61
Appendix 1 - Current and Future Water and Sanitation Projects in Africa 61
Appendix 2 - Major DWS Water and Sanitation Infrastructure Projects to be Implemented in the Medium Term 64
COMPANY PROFILES 67
Africa Water Projects and Construction (Pty) Ltd 67
Amatola Water Board 69
Bemlab (Pty) Ltd 71
Bureau Veritas (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd 73
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research 75
Dekker Biotech (Pty) Ltd 79
Department of Water and Sanitation 80
Ekurhuleni Water Care Company (RF) NPC 83
Gamtoos irrigation Board 86
ImproChem (Pty) Ltd 89
Johannesburg Water SOC Ltd 93
Lepelle Northern Water 97
Magalies Water 100
Mea Aqua Africa (Pty) Ltd 103
Microchem Lab Services (Pty) Ltd 105
Midvaal Water Company NPC 107
Nafasi Water Technologies (Pty) Ltd 109
Overberg Water Board 111
Rand Water 114
Regen Waters CC 117
Royal HaskoningDHV (Pty) Ltd 119
SA Water Works Utilities (Pty) Ltd 122
SGS South Africa (Pty) Ltd 124
Siza Water (RF) (Pty) Ltd 127
South African Bureau of Standards 129
Talbot Group (Pty) Ltd 133
Tecroveer Holdings (Pty) Ltd 136
Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority 138
uMngeni-uThukela Water 141
Vaal Central Water Board 144
Veolia Services Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd 147
Waterlab (Pty) Ltd 150