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Collection Purification Testing Distribution Water South Africa

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2022

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 24 January 2022

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water In South Africa 2020

Louise Mitchell | South Africa | 03 July 2020

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2017

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 29 September 2017

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2016

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 18 July 2016

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Report Coverage

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the collection, distribution and purification of water to household, agricultural, industrial, commercial and other users. Water testing laboratories are also covered. It includes comprehensive information on the size and state of the sector, budgets, infrastructure development and plans, trends, regulation and other influencing factors. There are profiles of 44 companies and organisations including the major relevant municipalities and water boards, water treatment specialists such as Africa Water Projects and Construction, testing laboratories including DD Science and Waterlab and wastewater treatment companies such as Royal Haskoning.

Introduction

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the collection, distribution and purification of water to household, agricultural, industrial, commercial and other users. Water testing laboratories are also covered. South Africa’s Constitution recognises that access to sufficient water and decent sanitation is a basic human right. It also establishes government as the custodian of all our water resources, responsible for ensuring that water as a resource from rivers, lakes and dams is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest. South Africa has moved from a water-stressed country to a water-scarce one. It is predicted that South Africa will form part of the extreme water scarcity category by 2025. South Africa is facing complex water challenges that include extreme drought and flooding due to climate change, poor and failing infrastructure, inadequate technical capacity, corruption and mismanagement and unacceptably low levels of service delivery. The quality of rivers and ground water remains poor, signalling weaknesses in water resource management. The Department of Water and Sanitation estimates the water infrastructure investment deficit to be R33bn per annum. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for universal access to water and sanitation. Three million people in South Africa do not have access to basic water supply and 14.1 million do not have access to safe sanitation.

Strengths

• Ability to track the prevalence of COVID-19 through wastewater surveillance and monitoring.
• Appointment of an Independent National Water Regulator.
• Availability of innovative technologies.
• National Water and Sanitation Master Plan.
• Planned diversification of the water mix.
• Research Commission’s water graduate employment programme.
• Strong research entity.

Weaknesses

• Allegations of wasteful and irregular expenditure, mismanagement and procurement irregularities at the Department of Water and Sanitation and other water entities.
• Current water usage exceeds the reliable yield of existing water infrastructure.
• Delays in implementation of infrastructure projects.
• Government monopoly over the water sector.
• High water losses.
• Inadequate technical capacity.
• Inconsistent and inadequate management across departments and different spheres of government.
• Pandemic has magnified the deficits in the water and sanitation sectors
• Poor and failing infrastructure.
• Poor design of wastewater treatment plants.
• Short supply of competent and skilled staff.
• Three million people without access to basic water supply and 14.1 million without access to safe sanitation.
• Unacceptably low levels of service delivery.
• Water infrastructure investment deficit of R33bn per annum.

Opportunities

• 42 water and sanitation projects under the Sustainable Infrastructure Development Symposium.
• Advances in technology re making water treatment more cost effective.
• Eleven strategic infrastructure projects under SIP 19: Water and Sanitation.

Threats

• Extreme drought and flooding due to climate change.
• Water scarcity.

Outlook

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the collection, distribution and purification of water to household, agricultural, industrial, commercial and other users. Water testing laboratories are also covered. South Africa’s Constitution recognises that access to sufficient water and decent sanitation is a basic human right. It also establishes government as the custodian of all our water resources, responsible for ensuring that water as a resource from rivers, lakes and dams is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest. South Africa has moved from a water-stressed country to a water-scarce one. It is predicted that South Africa will form part of the extreme water scarcity category by 2025. South Africa is facing complex water challenges that include extreme drought and flooding due to climate change, poor and failing infrastructure, inadequate technical capacity, corruption and mismanagement and unacceptably low levels of service delivery. The quality of rivers and ground water remains poor, signalling weaknesses in water resource management. The Department of Water and Sanitation estimates the water infrastructure investment deficit to be R33bn per annum. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for universal access to water and sanitation. Three million people in South Africa do not have access to basic water supply and 14.1 million do not have access to safe sanitation.

Read More..
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2022

Full Report

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 4 550.00(ZAR) estimated $ 246.76 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water In South Africa 2020-07-03

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2017-09-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

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The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2016-07-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 7
2.3. Size of the Industry 9
2.4. Key Success Factors and Pain Points 14
3. LOCAL 17
3.1. Key Trends 17
3.2. Notable Players 22
3.3. Corporate Actions 26
3.4. Regulations 27
3.5. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 30
4. AFRICA 31
5. INTERNATIONAL 34
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 36
6.1. COVID-19 36
6.2. Economic Environment 38
6.3. Labour 39
6.4. Governance and Procurement Issues 42
6.5. Status of Local Government 44
6.6. Blue and Green Drop Reports 45
6.7. Investment in Infrastructure 47
6.8. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 52
6.9. Environmental Issues 55
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 57
7.1. Competition 57
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 57
7.3. Barriers to Entry 58
8. SWOT ANALYSIS 58
9. OUTLOOK 59
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 60
11. REFERENCES 60
11.1. Publications 60
11.2. websites 62
APPENDIX 1 64
Summary of Notable Players 64
APPENDIX 2 80
Current and Future Water and Sanitation Projects on the African Continent 80
APPENDIX 3 86
Corruption Strategies in the Water and Sanitation Sector 86
COMPANY PROFILES 91
Africa Water Projects and Construction (Pty) Ltd 91
Amatola Water Board 93
Anglo Operations (Pty) Ltd 96
Bemlab (Pty) Ltd 99
Bloem Water 101
Bureau Veritas (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd 104
City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality 106
City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality 110
City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality (The) 113
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research 118
DD Science CC 122
Dekker Biotech (Pty) Ltd 124
Ekurhuleni Water Care Company (RF) NPC 125
Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd 128
eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality 133
Gamtoos Irrigation Board 136
ImproChem (Pty) Ltd 139
Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency 143
Johannesburg Water SOC Ltd 146
Lepelle Northern Water 150
Lower Sundays River Water User Association 153
Magalies Water 155
Mea Aqua Africa (Pty) Ltd 158
Mhlathuze Water Board 160
Microchem Lab Services (Pty) Ltd 163
Midvaal Water Company NPC 165
Nafasi Water Technologies (Pty) Ltd 167
Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality 169
Nkangala District Municipality 172
Overberg Water Board 174
Rand Water 176
Regen Waters CC 180
Royal HaskoningDHV (Pty) Ltd 182
SA Water Works Utilities (Pty) Ltd 185
Sedibeng Water 187
SGS South Africa (Pty) Ltd 190
Siza Water (RF) (Pty) Ltd 193
South African Bureau of Standards 195
Talbot Group (Pty) Ltd 200
Tecroveer Holdings (Pty) Ltd 203
Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority 205
Umgeni Water 208
Veolia Services Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd 211
Waterlab (Pty) Ltd 214

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the collection, distribution and purification of water to household, industrial, commercial and other users. It includes information on the size and state of the sector and pertinent information on infrastructure development, corporate actions, regulation and issues of corruption, non-payment and leaks. There are 41 profiles that include municipalities, research institutions, and major water utilities and water boards such as Umgeni Water, Rand Water and the Amatola Water Board.

Introduction

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the collection, distribution and purification of water to household, industrial, commercial and other users. Water testing laboratories are also covered. Municipal sales of water of R10.7bn contributed 10.2% to total revenue of all municipalities of R104.5bn in Q4 2019. The water sector has had some success in the continued roll-out of basic water and sanitation services to the population since 2016, although dilapidated infrastructure and widespread non-payment continue to present problems. The quality of wastewater treatment has shown a marked decrease over the last four years and industry analysts suggest that the water sector is on the verge of an infrastructural crisis exacerbated by institutional ineffectiveness and under-investment.

Strengths

• Installed infrastructure network is large.
• Robust strategic framework.

Weaknesses

• Critical shortage of skills.
• Dysfunctional infrastructure.
• Institutional maladministration.
• Sanitation segment is operating near or at capacity.
• Under-investment in the sector.

Opportunities

• Desalination technologies.
• Infrastructure investment and construction opportunities.
• Private sector partnerships to reduce municipal inefficiencies.
• Water research.

Threats

• Continued breakdown of infrastructure, particularly wastewater treatment plants.
• Continued institutional ineffectiveness at a municipal and national level.
• Drought and climate change.
• Population growth and increasing water demand may result in a significant water shortage by 2025.

Outlook

The Water Research Commission and the Department of Water and Sanitation suggest that, as demand naturally increases, South Africa could face a water supply deficit of around 17% by 2025. Increasingly dysfunctional infrastructure and institutional mismanagement, which undermine the current capacity and quality of the water supply, mean it is possible that the situation could be far worse than currently estimated. Capital expenditure on infrastructure is increasing, although behind the levels thought to be required, but municipal ineffectiveness and a lack of skills mean these measures are often ineffective. Despite the continued successes of the sector in extending basic water and sanitation supply to South Africans, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research notes that, it is “illogical to build more infrastructure without addressing the underlying factors that lead to the failure of this infrastructure”.

Read More..
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water In South Africa
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water In South Africa 2020

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.13 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2022-01-24

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2017-09-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2016-07-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 11
4.1. Local 11
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 16
4.1.2. Regulations 17
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 20
4.2. Continental 21
4.3. International 22
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 23
5.1. Economic Environment 23
5.2. Institutional Ineffectiveness 24
5.3. Service Delivery Protests 25
5.4. Drought 26
5.5. Government Initiatives 27
5.6. Labour 32
5.7. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 34
5.8. Environmental Concerns 36
6. COMPETITION 37
6.1. Barriers to Entry 38
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 39
8. OUTLOOK 39
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 40
10. REFERENCES 40
10.1. Publications 40
10.2. Websites 41
APPENDIX 1 42
Summary of Notable Players 42
COMPANY PROFILES 59
AFRICA WATER PROJECTS AND CONSTRUCTION (PTY) LTD 59
AMATOLA WATER BOARD 61
ANGLO OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 63
BEMLAB (PTY) LTD 66
BLOEM WATER 68
BUREAU VERITAS (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 72
CITY OF CAPE TOWN METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY 74
CITY OF EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY 78
CITY OF TSHWANE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (THE) 81
COUNCIL FOR SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH 86
DD SCIENCE CC 90
DEKKER BIOTECH (PTY) LTD 92
DURBAN WATER RECYCLING (PTY) LTD 93
EKURHULENI WATER CARE COMPANY (RF) NPC 95
ESKOM HOLDINGS SOC LTD 98
ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY 102
GAMTOOS IRRIGATION BOARD 104
IMPROCHEM (PTY) LTD 107
JOHANNESBURG WATER SOC LTD 111
LEPELLE NORTHERN WATER 115
LOWER SUNDAYS RIVER WATER USER ASSOCIATION 117
MAGALIES WATER 119
MEA AQUA AFRICA (PTY) LTD 122
MHLATHUZE WATER 124
MICROCHEM LAB SERVICES (PTY) LTD 126
MIDVAAL WATER COMPANY NPC 128
NAFASI WATER TECHNOLOGIES (PTY) LTD 130
NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY 132
NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 135
OVERBERG WATER BOARD 137
RAND WATER 139
REGEN WATERS CC 143
SA WATER WORKS UTILITIES (PTY) LTD 145
SEDIBENG WATER 147
SGS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 150
SIZA WATER (RF) (PTY) LTD 153
SOUTH AFRICAN BUREAU OF STANDARDS 155
TALBOT AND TALBOT (PTY) LTD 159
TECROVEER HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 162
UMGENI WATER 164
WATERLAB (PTY) LTD 167

Report Coverage

The detailed report on the South African Water sector examines current conditions, achievements and developments as well as factors that influence the success of the sector. Profiles for 40 entities are provided. These include municipal Water Boards countrywide and companies such as Water and Sanitation Services South Africa (Pty) Ltd whose clients include metropolitan, district and local municipalities, national and provincial government departments, water boards and mines. Also profiled are companies such as DD Science CC, an independent commercial laboratory that undertakes water analysis, and SGS South Africa (Pty) Ltd which is involved in wastewater treatment.

Introduction

This report focuses on the South African water sector and covers the supply, distribution and quality of water throughout the country. Municipal sales of water totalled some R30bn in 2016 while sanitation service charges amounted to R11.8bn and the sector employed some 11,600 people. The water sector has met with some success in the continued roll-out of basic water and sanitation services to the South African population in 2016 although dilapidated infrastructure and widespread non-payment continue to present problems. The quality of wastewater treatment has shown a marked decrease over the last year and many industry analysts suggest that South African water sector is on the verge of an infrastructural crisis exacerbated by institutional ineffectiveness and under-investment.

Strengths

• Installed infrastructure network is large.
• Robust strategic framework.

Weaknesses

• Critical shortage of skills.
• Dysfunctional infrastructure.
• High rates of non-revenue water.
• Institutional maladministration.
• Sanitation segment is operating near or at capacity.
• South Africa is dry and suffers from a lack of water resources.
• Under-investment in the sector.

Opportunities

• Desalination technologies.
• Infrastructure investment and construction opportunities.
• Private sector partnerships to reduce municipal inefficiencies.
• Water research.

Threats

• Continued breakdown of infrastructure, particularly wastewater treatment plants.
• Continued institutional ineffectiveness at a municipal and Departmental level.
• Drought, disaster and climate change.
• Natural population growth and increasing water demand may result in a significant water shortage by 2025.

Outlook

The Water Research Commission and the Department of Water and Sanitation suggest that, as demand naturally increases, South Africa could face a water supply deficit of around 17% by 2025. Combined with increasingly dysfunctional infrastructure and institutional mismanagement, which undermine the current capacity and quality of the water supply, it is possible that the situation could be far worse than currently estimated. According to ActionAid, South Africa faces the prospect of a “full-scale water crisis by 2020,” should the necessary measures not be taken. Capital expenditure on infrastructure is increasing, although behind the levels thought to be required, but municipal ineffectiveness and a lack of skills entail that these measures are often ineffective. Despite the continued successes of the sector in extending the basic water and sanitation supply to South Africans, the CSIR notes that, it is “illogical to build more infrastructure without addressing the underlying factors that lead to the failure of this infrastructure.”

Read More..
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.13 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2022-01-24

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water In South Africa 2020-07-03

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2016-07-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 24
4.1. Local 24
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 39
4.1.2. Regulations 39
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 41
4.2. Continental 42
4.3. International 44
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 46
5.1. Economic Environment 46
5.2. Institutional Effectiveness 46
5.3. Service Delivery Protests 48
5.4. Drought 49
5.5. Government Initiatives 50
5.6. Labour Resources 52
5.7. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 53
5.8. Environmental Concerns 55
6. COMPETITION 56
6.1. Barriers to Entry 57
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 58
8. OUTLOOK 58
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 59
10. REFERENCES 59
10.1. Publications 59
10.2. Website 60
COMPANY PROFILES 61
AMATOLA WATER BOARD 61
ANGLO OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 65
AVENG WATER (PTY) LTD 68
BEMLAB (PTY) LTD 70
BLOEM WATER BOARD 72
BOTJHENG WATER (PTY) LTD 76
BUREAU VERITAS TESTING AND INSPECTIONS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 78
CITY OF CAPE TOWN 80
CITY OF EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY 84
CITY OF TSHWANE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY (THE) 88
COUNCIL FOR SCIENTIFIC AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH 93
DD SCIENCE CC 97
DEKKER BIOTECH (PTY) LTD 99
EAST RAND WATER CARE COMPANY 100
ESKOM HOLDINGS SOC LTD 103
ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY 107
GAMTOOS IRRIGATION BOARD 110
IMPROCHEM (PTY) LTD 113
JOHANNESBURG WATER SOC LTD 116
LEPELLE NORTHERN WATER 119
LOWER SUNDAYS RIVER WATER USER ASSOCIATION 121
MAGALIES WATER 123
MHLATHUZE WATER 126
MICROCHEM LAB SERVICES (PTY) LTD 128
MIDVAAL WATER COMPANY 130
NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY 132
NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 135
OVERBERG WATER 137
RAND WATER 139
REGEN WATERS CC 142
S A M E WATER (PTY) LTD 144
SEDIBENG WATER 146
SEMBCORP SIZA WATER (RF) (PTY) LTD 149
SGS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 151
SOUTH AFRICAN BUREAU OF STANDARDS 154
TALBOT AND TALBOT (PTY) LTD 158
TECROVEER HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 161
UMGENI WATER 163
WATER AND SANITATION SERVICES SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 166
WATERLAB (PTY) LTD 169

Report Coverage

The detailed report on South Africa’s water sector describes current conditions, provides information and statistics on the basic supply and quality of water, and discusses factors influencing the success of the sector. The report profiles 41 players, including the municipalities in every province as well as water service providers such as Johannesburg Water, the Midvaal Water Company and the Greater Nelspruit Utility Company, which provide services on behalf of municipalities. Also profiled are a number of private companies including Aveng Water (Pty) Ltd, which offers mine and wastewater treatment and assists municipalities in providing long-term potable water supplies for domestic consumption, and Bureau Veritas Testing and Inspections South Africa (Pty) Ltd, which has three laboratories involved in the testing of water, air, soil and waste.

Introduction

This report focuses on the South African water sector, and covers the collection, purification, testing and distribution of water. Revenue accruing from water services is worth R34bn per annum and the sector directly employs around 12,000 people. The capital value of all installed water infrastructure is R1,220bn and the industry is the recipient of heavy government grants and investment. Since 2015 the water system has been operating at near capacity and expansion is required to keep abreast of growing demand. However, the sector is beset by difficulties because of the ineffective implementation of the requisite expansion.

Strengths

• Large installed infrastructure network.
• Robust strategic framework.

Weaknesses

• Critical shortage of skills.
• Dysfunctional infrastructure.
• High proportion NRW and water losses.
• Lack of water resources.
• Municipal ineffectiveness.
• Sector is operating near current capacity.
• Under-investment.

Opportunities

• Education and skills development programmes.
• Infrastructure provision contracts.
• Private sector partnerships.
• Water research.

Threats

• Climate change and continuing drought.
• Continuing ineffectiveness of municipalities.
• Water pollution due to AMD and treatment plants exceeding their capacity.

Outlook

The South African water sector faces a number of serious challenges that, if not addressed, could lead to negative outcomes in future. Research undertaken by the WRC and DWS suggest that, as demand increases, South Africa could face a water supply deficit of 20% by 2025. The National Water Resource Strategy notes that it is therefore vital that the sector implement the infrastructure projects necessary to guarantee sufficient water resources and water service delivery in the medium-term. However, current investment levels stand well below the estimated required levels to guarantee the 2025 water supply. More problematically, around 47% of installed water infrastructure is in urgent need of refurbishment, but municipal ineffectiveness and a lack of skills entail that the steps taken to address local infrastructure and service delivery issues are often ineffective. As expressed by Finance Minister, Pravin Gordhan, South Africa's water challenge is based not in identifying the necessary strategy, nor in finding the money, but in “reviving the implementation capabilities of municipalities and utilities.”

Read More..
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa
The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.13 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2022-01-24

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water In South Africa 2020-07-03

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water in South Africa 2017-09-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 24
4.1. Local 24
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 40
4.1.2. Regulations 41
4.2. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 42
4.3. Continental 42
4.4. International 44
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 45
5.1. Economic Environment 45
5.2. Drought 45
5.3. Government Intervention 46
5.4. Corruption 47
5.5. Labour Resources 48
5.6. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 50
5.7. Environmental Concerns 52
6. COMPETITION 53
6.1. Barriers to Entry 54
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 54
8. OUTLOOK 55
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 55
10. REFERENCES 56
10.1. Publications 56
10.2. Websites 56
APPENDIX 1 58
Planned WMAs and CMAs 58
APPENDIX 2 59
The Role of Each Player in the Water Value Chain 59
COMPANY PROFILES 60
Amatola Water Board 60
Anglo Operations (Pty) Ltd 63
Aveng Water (Pty) Ltd 66
Bemlab (Pty) Ltd 68
Bloem Water Board 70
Botjheng Water (Pty) Ltd 73
Bureau Veritas Testing and Inspections South Africa (Pty) Ltd 75
City of Cape Town 77
City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality (The) 81
Council for Scientific and Industrial Research 84
DD Science CC 88
Dekker Environmental Technologies CC 90
East Rand Water Care Company 92
Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality 95
eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality 98
Gamtoos Irrigation Board 101
Improchem (Pty) Ltd 103
Johannesburg Water SOC Ltd 106
Lepelle Northern Water 110
Lower Sundays River Water User Association 113
Magalies Water 115
Mhlathuze Water 118
Microchem Lab Services (Pty) Ltd 121
Midvaal Water Company 123
Mine Restoration Investments Ltd 125
Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality 127
Nkangala District Municipality 130
Overberg Water 132
Rand Water 134
Regen Waters CC 137
Roney Hoffmann Consultants CC 139
S A M E Water (Pty) Ltd 140
Sedibeng Water 142
Sembcorp Siza Water (RF) (Pty) Ltd 145
SGS South Africa (Pty) Ltd 147
South African Bureau of Standards 150
Talbot and Talbot (Pty) Ltd 153
Tecroveer Holdings (Pty) Ltd 156
Umgeni Water 158
Waterlab (Pty) Ltd 161
Water and Sanitation Services South Africa (Pty) Ltd 163