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education industry south africa

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022

Stephen Timm | South Africa | 18 August 2022

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 18 November 2020

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 30 September 2019

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 10 October 2018

The Education industry in South Africa 2017

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 08 September 2017

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 26 July 2017

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 08 June 2016

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 17 May 2016

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 30 June 2015

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 23 June 2015

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 31 July 2014

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 07 April 2014

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Report Coverage

This report on education in South Africa provides an overview of the state of education in South Africa and includes public and private education statistics and information on budgets, fees, enrolments, and trends. It includes public and private sector institutions and examines their enrolment and performance, corporate actions and developments. There are profiles of 53 companies including private sector players ADvTECH, Curro, Stadio and Educor, the major universities, and home education companies such as Clonard and Optimi Home.

Introduction

• Despite receiving about 20% of the national budget for two or more decades, South Africa has a dysfunctional public schooling system.
• The education system is characterised by crumbling infrastructure, overcrowded classrooms and poor educational outcomes.
• The poor quality of public schools and increasing number of people struggling to find a place at university and public colleges is driving enrolments at private schools and tertiary colleges.
• While school children and students have returned to classroom teaching and in-person lectures, education providers expect to continue to incorporate digital technologies in learning programmes.

Strengths

• An effective independent (private) school sector which includes low-fee private schools.
• Education is one of government’s priority sectors.
• South African universities are among the best ranked universities in Africa in various rankings.
• South Africa’s higher education sector attracts many students from the rest of Africa.

Weaknesses

• Accommodation shortages for students.
• Infrastructural backlog in many public schools, with little or no access to digital platforms.
• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• Public tertiary education institutions are unable to service demand from all students for placements.
• The quality of education in many public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in literacy, mathematics, and science.
• The school curriculum does not equip learners with skills for the technologically-driven world of work.

Opportunities

• A shortage of special needs schools, makes this is a possible area of opportunity for school operators.
• Distance education as technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the internet.
• Growing demand for higher education in South Africa and on the continent.
• Growth in the private higher education sector as the demand for high quality and more varied higher education increases.
• Growth of private schools if the public schooling system remains in crisis.
• Home schooling, which despite recording lower growth following the lifting of COVID-19 measures, is still growing.
• Providing or developing accommodation for tertiary education students.
• Provision of early childhood development services may grow if the government’s proposal to make two years compulsory is enacted.
• Provision of public education by private operators through “collaboration schools”.

Threats

• Collaboration schools, which are being piloted in the Western Cape, face being scrapped if Equal Education wins its court challenge against the Western Cape government.
• Continuing failure to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Continuing shortage of teachers, especially in maths and science.
• Growing concern over the sustainability of student funding which more than doubled between 2018 and 2022.
• Shortage of suitably-qualified staff.
• Some universities have seen a decline in their global ranking in recent years.
• The tougher economic climate is putting pressure on fees and cost increases.

Outlook

• The poor economy will see some education providers struggle, particularly with fee collection.
• Private education is likely to continue to see strong growth in enrolments, driven by increasing demand for quality education, which the state fails to provide.
• The shortage of spaces at public universities and tertiary education institutions will continue to drive the growth in enrolments at private tertiary educations.
• Consolidation of private providers is likely as small schools or colleges are snapped up by large players.
• Despite lockdown measures being removed, the adoption of online learning will continue, driven by the need to improve learning outcomes and reduce overheads.

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2022

Full Report

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 6 650.00(ZAR) estimated $ 348.02 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Primary and Secondary Education 1
2.2. Tertiary Education 4
2.3. Industry Value Chain 6
2.4. Geographic Position 6
2.5. Size of the Industry 9
2.6. Key Success Factors and Pain Points 18
3. LOCAL 19
3.1. State of the Industry 19
3.2. Key Trends 30
3.3. Notable Players 37
3.4. Corporate Actions 38
3.5. Regulations 39
3.6. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 43
4. AFRICA 44
5. INTERNATIONAL 47
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 49
6.1. COVID-19 49
6.2. Economic Environment 51
6.3. Labour 52
6.4. Skills Mismatch 57
6.5. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 59
6.6. Government Initiatives 60
6.7. Input Costs 64
6.8. Language Barriers 65
6.9. Early Childhood Development (ECD) 66
6.10. Access to Schools and Higher Education 66
6.11. Violence and Unrest 68
7. INFLUENCING FACTORS 69
7.1. Competition 69
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 71
7.3. Barriers to Entry 72
8. SWOT ANALYSIS 72
9. OUTLOOK 73
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 74
11. REFERENCES 75
11.1. Publications 75
11.2. Websites 76
APPENDIX 1 - SUMMARY OF NOTABLE PLAYERS 78
Independent Educational Institutions 78
Public Schools 83
Public and Private Universities 84
Correspondence and Private Vocational Colleges 87
COMPANY PROFILES 89
ADvTECH Ltd 89
BASA Educational Institute Trust 95
Boston City Campus (Pty) Ltd 97
Business Management Training College (Pty) Ltd 101
Business School of South Africa (Pty) Ltd (The) 103
Cape Peninsula University of Technology 104
Central University of Technology, Free State 108
Clonard Education (Pty) Ltd 119
Curro Holdings Ltd 121
Department of Basic Education 128
Durban University of Technology (Pty) Ltd 131
eAdvance (Pty) Ltd 134
Educor Holdings (Pty) Ltd 136
Eduvos (Pty) Ltd 139
Foster-Melliar (Pty) Ltd 142
Future Nation Schools Fleurhof (Pty) Ltd 144
Generation Education (Pty) Ltd 146
LEAP Science & Maths Schools 149
Mancosa (Pty) Ltd 152
Mangosuthu University of Technology 154
My Tutor and Teaching Center CC 158
Nelson Mandela University 159
North-West University 164
Nova Pioneer South Africa (Pty) Ltd 169
Optimi Home (Pty) Ltd 173
Pembury Lifestyle Group Ltd 175
Regenesys Management (Pty) Ltd 179
Regent Business School (Pty) Ltd 182
Rhodes University 185
Richfield Graduate Institute of Technology (Pty) Ltd 192
SANTS Private Higher Education Institution (Pty) Ltd 195
Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University 197
Sol Plaatje University 199
Stadio Holdings Ltd 202
Tshwane University of Technology 206
TSIBA Education NPC 213
Tutor the Future Tuition (Pty) Ltd 216
University of Cape Town 217
University of Fort Hare 222
University of Johannesburg 225
University of KwaZulu-Natal 231
University of Limpopo 237
University of Mpumalanga 242
University of Pretoria 246
University of South Africa 251
University of Stellenbosch 257
University of the Free State 262
University of the Western Cape 266
University of the Witwatersrand 270
University of Venda 276
University of Zululand (The) 281
Vaal University of Technology 285
Walter Sisulu University 289

Report Coverage

This report focuses on South Africa’s public and private education sector, including information on the state and size of the sector, education budgets, learning outcomes, developments in the public and private sectors and the effect of coronavirus on the sector and education outcomes. There are profiles of 53 companies and institutions, including state institutions such as universities and education departments, major education companies such as Curro, ADvTECH and Educor and business schools such as Regent and Regenesys.

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s education sector, which despite receiving about 20% of the national budget, has a dysfunctional public schooling system and poor outcomes. According to Amnesty International, the country’s education system is characterised by crumbling infrastructure, overcrowded classrooms, and poor educational outcomes, all of which perpetuate inequality and, as a result, fail many of its children. The coronavirus pandemic has added to these challenges by disrupting the academic year and highlighting the sector’s need to rethink its approach to digital teaching platforms. The sector is also unprepared to equip students with the technological, critical thinking and problem-solving skills necessary for a successful economy.

Strengths

• An effective independent school sector which includes low-fee private schools.
• Education is one of government’s priority sectors.
• South Africa’s higher education sector attracts many students from the rest of Africa.

Weaknesses

• Accommodation shortages for students.
• Corruption and mismanagement at many schools.
• Infrastructural backlog in many public schools, with little or no access to digital platforms.
• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• The quality of education in many public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in literacy, mathematics, and science.
• The school curriculum does not equip learners with skills for the technologically-driven world of work.

Opportunities

• Distance education as technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the internet.
• Growing demand for higher education.
• Growth in the private higher education sector as the demand for high quality and more varied higher education increases.
• Growth of home schooling.
• Growth of private schools if the public schooling system remains in crisis.

Threats

• Continuing failure to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Continuing shortage of teachers, especially in maths and science.
• Instability at some higher education institutions.
• Not all teachers have digital teaching and technology skills.
• Shortage of suitably qualified staff.

Outlook

Education remains one of South Africa’s biggest challenges. The pandemic has disrupted the academic year and highlighted the importance of technology in education. South Africa is still struggling with educational equality as the numbers of under-resourced rural schools have not decreased in the last two decades. Amnesty International executive director, Shenilla Mohamed said the repeated failure of government to address issues affecting the education sector “is not only a question of accountability, it has consequences for the life chances of thousands of young people and the future of this country”.

Read More..
The Education Industry in South Africa 2020

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Primary and Secondary Education 1
2.2. Tertiary Education Sector 3
2.3. Industry Value Chain 5
2.4. Geographic Position 5
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4.1. Local 8
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 25
4.1.2. Regulations 26
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 28
4.2. Continental 29
4.3. International 32
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 35
5.1. Coronavirus 35
5.2. Economic Environment 36
5.3. Rising Costs 37
5.4. Government Initiatives 37
5.5. Poverty and Lack of Resources 40
5.6. Language Barriers 40
5.7. Early Childhood Development (ECD) Facilities 41
5.8. Corruption 42
5.9. Access to Schools and Higher Education 43
5.10. Violence and Unrest 43
5.11. Labour 45
5.12. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 51
6. COMPETITION 58
6.1. Barriers to Entry 59
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 60
8. OUTLOOK 60
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 61
10. REFERENCES 62
10.1. Publications 62
10.2. Websites 63
APPENDIX 1 - SUMMARY OF NOTABLE PLAYERS 64
Independent Educational Institutions in South Africa 64
Public Schools 68
Public and Private Universities 69
Correspondence and Private Vocational Colleges 71
COMPANY PROFILES - PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 74
ADVTECH LTD 74
BASA EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE TRUST 80
CLONARD EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 82
CURRO HOLDINGS LTD 83
DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION 90
EADVANCE (PTY) LTD 93
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 95
FUTURE NATION SCHOOLS (PTY) LTD 98
GENERATION EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 100
LEAP SCIENCE & MATHS SCHOOLS 103
MY TUTOR AND TEACHING CENTER CC 106
NOVA PIONEER SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 108
OPTIMI HOME (PTY) LTD 111
PEMBURY LIFESTYLE GROUP LTD 113
TUTOR THE FUTURE TUITION (PTY) LTD 117
COMPANY PROFILES – EDUCATION BY UNIVERSITIES 118
ADVTECH LTD 118
CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 124
CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, FREE STATE 128
DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 132
MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 137
NELSON MANDELA UNIVERSITY 141
NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY 146
PEARSON INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 151
RHODES UNIVERSITY 154
SEFAKO MAKGATHO HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY 158
SOL PLAATJE UNIVERSITY 160
TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 162
UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN 167
UNIVERSITY OF FORT HARE 171
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG 174
UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL 180
UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO 186
UNIVERSITY OF MPUMALANGA 190
UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA 194
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA 199
UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH 205
UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE 210
UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE 214
UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND 218
UNIVERSITY OF VENDA 223
UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND (THE) 227
VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 231
WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY 234
COMPANY PROFILES - CORRESPONDENCE AND PRIVATE VOCATIONAL COLLEGES 238
ADVTECH LTD 238
BOSTON CITY CAMPUS AND BUSINESS COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 244
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 248
BUSINESS SCHOOL OF SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD (THE) 250
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 251
FOSTER-MELLIAR (PTY) LTD 254
MANCOSA (PTY) LTD 256
PEARSON INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 258
REGENESYS MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 261
REGENT BUSINESS SCHOOL (PTY) LTD 263
RICHFIELD GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 265
SANTS PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION (PTY) LTD 268
STADIO HOLDINGS LTD 270
TSIBA EDUCATION NPC 274

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s education sector, which is failing the country’s economy. Despite increased funding from the government, the quality of South Africa’s public education remains poor and youth unemployment is at its highest. The overall 2019/20 budget allocation for the Department of Basic Education (DBE) is R24.5bn, which is an increase of 3.4% from the 2018/19 allocation. However, 78% of South African children in grade 3 still cannot read for meaning. About 400,000 students who started grade one 12 years ago, did not reach grade 12 in 2018. In the higher education sector, universities can accommodate only 18% of South African matriculants. Of those 18%, about 47% will drop out and if distance learning is taken into account, that figure rises to 68%. Experts have also warned that South Africa’s education system is flooding the jobs market with graduates who do not possess the skills that match what the economy requires.

Strengths

• A thriving, effective independent school sector which includes low-fee private schools.
• Education is one of government's priority sectors.
• South Africa’s higher education sector attracts many students from the rest of Africa.

Weaknesses

• Corruption and mismanagement at many schools.
• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• The quality of education in many public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in literacy, mathematics and science.

Opportunities

• Distance education as technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the internet.
• Growing demand for higher education.
• Growth in the private higher education sector as the demand for high quality and more varied higher education increases.
• Growth of home-schooling.
• Growth of private schools as long as the public schooling system remains in crisis.

Threats

• Continuing failure to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Continuing shortage of teachers, especially in mathematics and science
• Increasing shortage of qualified staff.
• Instability at higher education institutions.

Outlook

Education reduces poverty, boosts economic growth and increases income. Despite South Africa’s significant education budget, the quality of education is not improving, and the majority of learners do not get a strong foundation in basic literacy and numeracy. The independent school and home-schooling sectors are expected to continue to grow in response to poor public education. The high drop-out rate in the school and higher education sectors continues to increase, and South Africa’s education is failing the economy. Unless institutions of higher learning rework the curriculum to produce graduates with skills to match what the economy requires, the skills mismatch will continue.

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Tertiary Education Sector 4
2.2. Industry Value Chain 5
2.3. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 10
4.1. Local 10
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 21
4.1.2. Regulations 21
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 24
4.2. Continental 25
4.3. International 27
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
5.1. Economic Environment and Rising Costs 28
5.2. Government Initiatives 28
5.3. Private Sector Initiatives 30
5.4. Poverty and Lack of Resources 30
5.5. Language Barriers 31
5.6. Access to Quality Early Childhood Development (ECD) Facilities 31
5.7. Corruption 32
5.8. Access to Schools and Higher Education 32
5.9. Violence and Unrest 34
5.10. Technology, R&D and Innovation 34
5.11. Labour 36
6. COMPETITION 40
6.1. Barriers to Entry 40
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 41
8. OUTLOOK 41
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 42
10. REFERENCES 43
10.1. Publications 43
10.2. Websites 44
APPENDIX 1 – SUMMARY OF MAJOR PLAYERS 45
Independent Educational Institutions in South Africa 45
Public Schools 48
Public and Private Universities 49
Correspondence and Private Vocational Colleges 52
COMPANY PROFILES - PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 54
ADVTECH LTD 54
BASA EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE TRUST 60
CURRO HOLDINGS LTD 62
DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION 69
EADVANCE (PTY) LTD 72
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 74
FUTURE NATION SCHOOLS (PTY) LTD 77
GENERATION EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 79
LEAP SCIENCE & MATHS SCHOOLS 81
NOVA PIONEER SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 84
PEMBURY LIFESTYLE GROUP LTD 86
COMPANY PROFILES – EDUCATION BY UNIVERSITIES 90
ADVTECH LTD 90
CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 96
CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, FREE STATE 100
DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 104
MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 108
NELSON MANDELA UNIVERSITY 112
NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY 117
PEARSON INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 122
RHODES UNIVERSITY 126
SEFAKO MAKGATHO HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY 130
SOL PLAATJE UNIVERSITY 132
TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 134
UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN 139
UNIVERSITY OF FORT HARE 143
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG 146
UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL 152
UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO 158
UNIVERSITY OF MPUMALANGA 162
UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA 165
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA 170
UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH 176
UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE 181
UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE 185
UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND 189
UNIVERSITY OF VENDA 194
UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND (THE) 198
VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 202
WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY 205
COMPANY PROFILES - CORRESPONDENCE AND PRIVATE VOCATIONAL COLLEGES 209
ADVTECH LTD 209
BOSTON CITY CAMPUS AND BUSINESS COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 215
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 219
BUSINESS SCHOOL OF SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD (THE) 221
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 222
FOSTER-MELLIAR (PTY) LTD 225
MANCOSA (PTY) LTD 227
PEARSON INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 229
REGENESYS MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 233
REGENT BUSINESS SCHOOL (PTY) LTD 235
RICHFIELD GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 238
SANTS PRIVATE UNIVERSITY (PTY) LTD 241
STADIO HOLDINGS LTD 243
TSIBA EDUCATION 246

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s primary, secondary and tertiary education sectors, which continue to remain in a turmoil. Despite high levels of investment by the government, South African education lags behind comparable countries in literacy and numeracy. In 2017, the South African Child Gauge revealed that 58% of children cannot read fluently and with comprehension at the end of Grade 4. More than half the children who start in Grade 1 do not reach Grade 12 and usually drop out in Grade 10. In the higher education sector, 50-60% of South African students drop out after the first year and only a minority of students complete a three-year degree in the allotted time. The high rates of unemployment among young people also indicate that many are unprepared for life after school. Statistics show that the South African government spends 4.7% of revenue on tertiary education and training, which is about 0.75% of GDP. In 2018 a further R57bn was allocated to fund free tertiary education for first year students who qualify. However, this will not address the problem of the skills mismatch in the labour market. According to figures by Statistics South Africa, more than half of people aged between 15 and 24 are unemployed.

Strengths

• A thriving, effective independent school sector which includes low-fee private schools.
• Education is one of government's priority sectors.
• South Africa’s higher education sector attracts many students from the rest of Africa.

Weaknesses

• Corruption and mismanagement at many schools.
• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• The quality of education in many public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in literacy, mathematics and science.

Opportunities

• Distance education as technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the internet.
• Growing demand for higher education.
• Growth for private schools as long as the public schooling system remains in crisis.
• Growth for the home schooling sector.
• Growth for the private higher education sector as the demand for high quality and more varied higher education increases.

Threats

• Continuing failure to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Continuing shortage of teachers, especially in mathematics and science
• Increasing shortage of qualified staff.
• Instability at higher education institutions.

Outlook

Despite increasing investments each year by the government, the quality of education in South Africa has hardly improved. The schooling system is failing learners long before they reach the final year and the high drop-out rate remains unaddressed. As a result of the dismal performance in the public education sector education, the independent school and home schooling sectors continue to grow. While government’s free education for first year students who qualify will result in increased number of enrolments, the higher education sector remains plagued by students dropping out after the first year, a shortage of academic staff, instability at campuses and the skills mismatch in the labour market. These factors are expected to contribute to the rapid growth of private higher education Institutions.

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Primary and Secondary Education 1
2.2. Tertiary Education Sector 4
2.3. Industry Value Chain 5
2.4. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 10
4.1. Local 10
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 21
4.1.2. Regulations 21
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 24
4.2. Continental 25
4.3. International 27
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
5.1. Economic Environment and Rising Costs 28
5.2. Government Initiatives 29
5.3. Private Sector Initiatives 30
5.4. Poverty and Lack of Resources 30
5.5. Language Barriers 30
5.6. Access to Quality Early Childhood Development (ECD) Facilities 31
5.7. Poor School Management and Corruption 31
5.8. Access to Higher Education 32
5.9. Violence and Unrest 32
5.10. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 33
5.11. Labour 35
6. COMPETITION 39
6.1. Barriers to Entry 40
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 40
8. OUTLOOK 41
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 41
10. REFERENCES 43
10.1. Publications 43
10.2. Websites 43
APPENDIX 1 – SUMMARY OF MAJOR PLAYERS 45
Independent Educational Institutions in South Africa 45
Public Schools 48
Public and Private Universities 48
Correspondence and Private Vocational Colleges 51
APPENDIX 2 54
Outcomes Based Education (OBE) and Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) 54
COMPANY PROFILES - PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 56
ADVTECH LTD 56
BASA EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE TRUST 61
CURRO HOLDINGS LTD 63
DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION 69
EADVANCE (PTY) LTD 73
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 76
FUTURE NATION SCHOOLS (PTY) LTD 80
GENERATION EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 82
LEAP SCIENCE & MATHS SCHOOLS 84
PEMBURY LIFESTYLE GROUP LTD 87
PIONEER ACADEMIES (PTY) LTD 91
COMPANY PROFILES – EDUCATION BY UNIVERSITIES 93
ADVTECH LTD 93
CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 98
CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, FREE STATE 102
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 105
DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 108
MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 112
MONASH SOUTH AFRICA LTD 116
NELSON MANDELA UNIVERSITY 119
NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY 124
RHODES UNIVERSITY 129
SEFAKO MAKGATHO HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY 133
SOL PLAATJE UNIVERSITY 136
TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 139
UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN 144
UNIVERSITY OF FORT HARE 148
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG 152
UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL 157
UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO 163
UNIVERSITY OF MPUMALANGA 167
UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA 170
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA 175
UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH 182
UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE 187
UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE 191
UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND 195
UNIVERSITY OF VENDA 201
UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND (THE) 205
VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 209
WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY 213
COMPANY PROFILES - CORRESPONDENCE AND PRIVATE VOCATIONAL COLLEGES 216
ADVTECH LTD 216
BOSTON CITY CAMPUS AND BUSINESS COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 221
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 225
BUSINESS SCHOOL OF SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD (THE) 227
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 228
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 231
FOSTER-MELLIAR (PTY) LTD 235
MANCOSA (PTY) LTD 237
PEARSON INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 239
REGENESYS MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 242
REGENT BUSINESS SCHOOL (PTY) LTD 244
RICHFIELD GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 247
SANTS PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION (PTY) LTD 249
STADIO HOLDINGS LTD 251
TSIBA EDUCATION 254

Report Coverage

The report on South Africa’s troubled Tertiary Education sector describes current conditions, the problems facing universities and TVETs and factors influencing the success of the sector. The report profiles 29 public and private universities as well as 16 correspondence and private colleges. Included is ADvTECH’s closest competitor, Curro, which acquired AFDA in August 2017 and expressed its intention of listing its Tertiary unit Stadio on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange in September 2017.

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s troubled Tertiary Education sector which is trying to recover from the effects of last year's violent protests against fee increases that caused many Higher Education institutions to temporarily close their doors. Statistics show that the South African government spends 4.7% of revenue on Tertiary Education and Training, which is about 0.75% of GDP. Although spending on post-school Education and Training is expected to reach R89.8bn by 2019/20, up from R68.7bn in 2016/2017, growing at an average annual rate of 9.2%, the sector still faces other significant challenges. These include high drop-out rates and a shortage of academic staff.

Strengths

• South Africa’s Higher Education sector is the most diverse in Africa and it attracts many students from the rest of Africa.

Weaknesses

• High drop-out rates.
• Higher Education is expensive.
• The sector is not providing the skills required to grow South Africa’s economy.

Opportunities

• Distance Education as Information Technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the Internet.
• Growing demand for Higher Education from students with an expected 1.6 million students enrolling at Higher Education Institutions across the country by 2030.
• Growth for the private sector as the demand for high quality and more varied Higher Education increases.

Threats

• Continuing failure of the General Education and Training (GET) sector to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Increasing shortage of qualified staff.
• Recurring violence and unrest at Higher Education Institutions.

Outlook

South Africa's Higher Education sector will continue its struggle with the issue of expanding access to public universities and making Higher Education more affordable. Stakeholders believe that in order to ensure a better future for all South Africans, increased access to relevant Higher Education courses of a high standard is essential. This would result in a Higher Education system that could create employable citizens who would have the necessary skills to promote economic growth and sustainability in the country. In the meantime the high drop-out rates, the shortage of academic staff and the unrest on campuses are expected to contribute to the continued growth of private Higher Education Institutions.

Read More..
The Education industry in South Africa 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4.1. Local 9
4.1.1. Public Higher Education 9
4.1.2. Corporate Actions 16
4.1.3. Regulations 17
4.1.4. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 19
4.2. Continental 20
4.3. International 21
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 22
5.1. Government Initiatives 22
5.2. Economic Environment and Rising Costs 26
5.3. Violence and Unrest 27
5.4. Access to Higher Education 28
5.5. Labour 30
5.6. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 31
6. COMPETITION 33
6.1. Barriers to Entry 35
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 35
8. OUTLOOK 36
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 36
10. REFERENCES 37
10.1. Publications 37
10.2. Websites 37
COMPANY PROFILES - EDUCATION BY UNIVERSITIES 38
ADVTECH LTD 38
CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 43
CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, FREE STATE 47
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 52
DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 55
MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 59
MONASH SOUTH AFRICA LTD 63
NELSON MANDELA UNIVERSITY 65
NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY 70
RHODES UNIVERSITY 75
SEFAKO MAKGATHO HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY 79
SOL PLAATJE UNIVERSITY 82
TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 84
UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN 87
UNIVERSITY OF FORT HARE 91
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG 94
UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL 98
UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO 103
UNIVERSITY OF MPUMALANGA 107
UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA 110
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA 114
UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH 121
UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE 127
UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE 131
UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND 134
UNIVERSITY OF VENDA 139
UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND (THE) 143
VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 147
WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY 150
0
COLLEGES 153
ADVTECH LTD 153
BOSTON CITY CAMPUS AND BUSINESS COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 158
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 162
BUSINESS SCHOOL OF SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD (THE) 164
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 165
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 168
FOSTER-MELLIAR (PTY) LTD 171
MANCOSA (PTY) LTD 173
MILPARK EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 175
PEARSON INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 177
REGENESYS MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 180
REGENT BUSINESS SCHOOL (PTY) LTD 182
RICHFIELD GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 184
SANTS PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION (PTY) LTD 186
SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOL OF MOTION PICTURE MEDIUM AND LIVE PERFORMANCE (PTY) LTD (THE) 188
TSIBA EDUCATION 190

Report Coverage

The South African Primary and Secondary Education Sector report describes current conditions and focuses on academic standards and initiatives to improve these standards. The report profiles 11 independent school groups and includes information on the number of government schools, teachers and learners in the country. Profiles for new entrants into the sector are also provided. These include Pembury Lifestyle Group (PLG), which in November 2016 listed its PLG Schools on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange’s Alternative Exchange, and Future Nation Schools (Pty) Ltd, which follows a project-based learning approach which tries to encourage learners to design, plan and execute extended projects by applying the theory they learn to solve real world problems.

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s primary and secondary education sector which, according to experts, lags decades behind first world levels. South Africa’s Basic Education funding allocation has been increased to R751.9bn for 2018/19, an increase of R1.1bn from the 2016/2017 financial year. Despite government spending about 15% of the total budget on Basic Education, the public education sector remains in crisis and is still struggling to overcome poor literacy levels, poor Mathematics and Science results, a high drop-out rate and under-performing teachers. The failure of public school education to overcome these challenges, has however, continued to provide growth for the independent school sector, which has expanded rapidly throughout the country.

Strengths

• A thriving, effective independent school sector which includes low-fee private schools.
• Education is one of government's priority sectors.

Weaknesses

• Corruption and mismanagement at many schools.
• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• The quality of education in many South African public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in Literacy, Mathematics and Science.
• Under-spending of ASIDI resulting in learners still attending mud schools without electricity and water.

Opportunities

• Growth for private schools as long as the public schooling system remains in crisis.
• Growth for the home schooling sector.

Threats

• Continuing shortage of teachers, especially in Mathematics and Science.
• Education will suffer further if CAPS is as unsuccessful as OBE.

Outlook

Providing quality education for all children across South Africa remains one of the most crucial challenges facing the country and in support of this National Treasury projects an increase of 7.4% in the sector’s budget in the next three fiscal years. With South Africa’s public education sector facing an ongoing crisis and academics asserting that they have not seen any real improvement in the quality of the country’s education despite increased spending, the independent school sector continues to grow. In addition, there has also been growth in the home schooling sector, which is expected to grow at about 20% per annum.

Read More..
The Education Industry in South Africa 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 14
4.1. Local 14
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 23
4.1.2. Regulations 24
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 25
4.2. Continental 25
4.3. International 27
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
5.1. Government Support and Initiatives 28
5.2. Economic Environment 28
5.3. Poverty and a Lack of Resources 29
5.4. Language Barriers 30
5.5. Access to Quality Early Childhood Development (ECD) Facilities 30
5.6. Poor School Management and Corruption 31
5.7. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 31
5.8. Labour 32
6. COMPETITION 35
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 36
8. OUTLOOK 36
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 37
10. REFERENCES 38
10.1. Publications 38
10.2. Websites 38
APPENDIX 1 40
Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) 40
APPENDIX 2 41
Outcomes Based Education (OBE) and Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) 41
COMPANY PROFILES 43
ADVTECH LTD 43
BASA EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE TRUST 48
CURRO HOLDINGS LTD 50
DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION 56
EADVANCE (PTY) LTD 60
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 62
FUTURE NATION SCHOOLS (PTY) LTD 65
LEAP SCIENCE & MATHS SCHOOLS 67
PEMBURY LIFESTYLE GROUP LTD 70
PIONEER ACADEMIES (PTY) LTD 73
SUMMIT EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 75
TREMATON CAPITAL INVESTMENTS LTD 76

Report Coverage

The Tertiary Education report describes current conditions, attempts by government to improve the quality and accessibility of public Higher Education and factors that influence the success of the sector. The report profiles 44 role players in the sector including the University of Cape Town, rated Africa’s top university. Also profiled is the country’s largest private tertiary provider, ADvTECH Ltd, which reports that enrolments for B.Com and other business-related degrees at its Varsity College campuses are increasing year-on-year, and new entrant SANTS Private Higher Education Institution (Pty) Ltd, which focuses on teacher education.

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s Tertiary Education sector which is struggling to overcome significant challenges. These include insufficient funding, a shortage of academic staff, the gap in standards between Secondary and Higher Education, high drop-out rates and the skills mismatch in the labour market. Higher Education Minister Blade Nzimande has acknowledged the challenges facing the sector, especially with regard to the university fee increases which resulted in the Fees Must Fall protests across the country’s universities in October 2015. In his 2016 Budget Speech, Minister Nzimande reported that the Department’s budget would increase at an annual average 9.8%, from R42bn in 2015/16 to R55.3bn in 2018/19 in an effort to produce graduates with the skills that are urgently required to grow South Africa’s economy.

Strengths

• South Africa’s Higher Education sector is the most diverse in Africa and it attracts many students from the rest of Africa.

Weaknesses

• High drop-out rates.
• Higher Education is expensive.
• Ranked last for the quality of Maths and Science education at Higher Education level.
• The sector is not providing the skills required to grow South Africa’s economy.

Opportunities

• Distance Education as information technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the Internet. (MOOCs)
• Growing demand for Higher Education from students with an expected 1.6 million students enrolling at Higher Education institutions across the country by 2030.
• Growth for the private sector as the demand for high quality and more varied Higher Education increases.

Threats

• Continuing failure of the General Education and Training (GET) sector to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Continuing violence and unrest at Higher Education Institutions.
• Increasing shortage of qualified staff.

Outlook

Despite South Africa's investment in education being among the highest in the world, the country’s Higher Education sector continues to perform poorly in comparison to other countries and many graduates are ill-equipped to enter the workplace and function effectively. Analysts assert that until the sector is able to overcome the numerous challenges that include university funding issues, high drop-out rates and a shortage of academic staff, the South African economy will continue to suffer from the shortage of skills in the workplace. Role players expect that enrolments at private Higher Education institutions will continue growing as a result of the unrest on public university campuses and because of the private institutions’ “work-readiness approach” and smaller class sizes.

Read More..
The Education Industry in South Africa 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4.1. Local 9
4.1.1. Public Higher Education 9
4.1.2. Private Higher Education 13
4.1.3. Corporate Actions 14
4.1.4. Regulations 15
4.1.5. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 17
4.2. Continental 18
4.3. International 21
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 22
5.1. Government Initiatives 22
5.2. Economic Environment and Rising Operating Costs 24
5.3. Violence and Unrest 25
5.4. Labour 26
5.5. Access to Higher Education 27
5.6. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 28
6. COMPETITION 31
6.1. Barriers to Entry 32
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 32
8. OUTLOOK 33
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 33
10. REFERENCES 34
10.1. Publications 34
10.2. Websites 34
COMPANY PROFILES – UNIVERSITIES 36
Cape Peninsula University of Technology 36
Central University of Technology, Free State 40
City Varsity (Pty) Ltd 42
CTI Education Group (Pty) Ltd 44
Durban University of Technology (Pty) Ltd 47
Mangosuthu University of Technology 50
Monash South Africa Ltd 54
Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University 57
North-West University 62
Rhodes University 67
Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University 70
Sol Plaatje University 72
Tshwane University of Technology 74
University of Cape Town 78
University of Fort Hare 82
University of Johannesburg 85
University of KwaZulu-Natal 90
University of Limpopo 95
University of Mpumalanga 98
University of Pretoria 100
University of South Africa 104
University of Stellenbosch 110
University of the Free State 115
University of the Western Cape 119
University of the Witwatersrand 123
University of Venda 128
University of Zululand (The) 132
Vaal University of Technology 136
Walter Sisulu University 139
COMPANY PROFILES – CORRESPONDENCE AND PRIVATE VOCATIONAL COLLEGES 143
ADVTECH Ltd 143
Boston City Campus And Business College (Pty) Ltd 148
Business Management Training College (Pty) Ltd 152
Business School Of South Africa (Pty) Ltd (The) 154
CTI Education Group (Pty) Ltd 155
Educor Holdings (Pty) Ltd 158
Foster-Melliar (Pty) Ltd 163
Milpark Education (Pty) Ltd 165
Pearson Institute Of Higher Education (Pty) Ltd 167
Regenesys Management (Pty) Ltd 170
Regent Business School (Pty) Ltd 172
Richfield Graduate Institute Of Technology (Pty) Ltd 174
Sants Private Higher Education Institution (Pty) Ltd 176
South African School Of Motion Picture Medium And Live Performance (Pty) Ltd (The) 178
TSIBA Education 180

Report Coverage

The Primary and Secondary Education report describes current conditions, how the crisis in education has fuelled the growth of independent/private schools and initiatives to improve the quality of education in state schools. The report profiles Curro Holdings, South Africa’s largest private education firm in the primary and secondary sector operating 110 schools on 47 campuses. Its closest competitor, Advtech, which over the last two years has spent R2bn buying and expanding schools, is also profiled as is eAdvance (Pty) Ltd t/a SPARK Schools, a network of less expensive private schools based in Gauteng.

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s primary and secondary education sector which remains in a state of crisis. South Africa spends more on education than any other African country, approximately 6% of its GDP. Basic education funding has been increasing annually and will increase from R204bn in 2016/2017 to R254bn in 2018/19. Despite this, the public education sector is still struggling to overcome numerous challenges, which include a high drop-out rate, corruption and mismanagement of schools, unqualified teachers and poor Mathematics and Science results. The poor quality of public school education has however, fuelled the growth of independent schools, which continue to expand countrywide.

Strengths

• A thriving, effective independent school sector which includes low-fee private schools
• Education is one of government's priority sectors and R204bn has been allocated to the DBE for the 2016/2017 financial year, increasing to R254bn in 2018/19.

Weaknesses

• Corruption and mismanagement at many schools.
• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• The quality of education in many South African public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in Literacy, Mathematics and Science.
• Under-spending of ASIDI resulting in learners still attending mud schools without electricity and water.

Opportunities

• Growth for private schools as long as the public schooling system remains in crisis.

Threats

• Continuing shortage of teachers, especially in Mathematics and Science.
• Education will suffer further if CAPS is as unsuccessful as OBE.

Outlook

South Africa’s high unemployment is closely linked to inadequate education provision and despite the country having one of the highest rates of government investment in education in the world, the education sector remains in crisis. The country’s poor results for Mathematics and Science is of great concern especially since 93 of the top 100 scarce skills in South Africa require a good pass in Mathematics. While attempts are being made to address the quality of Mathematics and Science education to better equip learners with the necessary skills and knowledge to compete in a modern economy, the sector is also struggling with other issues including a high drop-out rate, unqualified teachers, language barriers and the need for proper early childhood development infrastructure. Stakeholders believe that until these issues are addressed successfully and the public education sector improves, South Africa’s private school sector will continue to grow as more dissatisfied parents of children at public schools turn to the private sector to educate their children.

Read More..
The Education Industry in South Africa 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 13
4.1. Local 13
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 20
4.1.2. Regulations 20
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 22
4.2. Continental 22
4.3. International 24
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 24
5.1. Government Support and Initiatives 24
5.2. Economic Environment 25
5.3. Poverty and a Lack of Resources 26
5.4. Language Barriers 26
5.5. Access to Quality Early Childhood Development Facilities 27
5.6. Poor School Management and Corruption 28
5.7. Labour 29
5.8. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 32
6. COMPETITION 35
6.1. Barriers to Entry 35
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 36
8. OUTLOOK 36
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 37
10. REFERENCES 38
10.1. Publications 38
10.2. Websites 38
APPENDIX 1 39
Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET 39
APPENDIX 2 40
Outcomes Based Education (OBE) and Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) 40
COMPANY PROFILES 42
ADVTECH LTD 42
BASA EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE TRUST 47
CURRO HOLDINGS LTD 49
DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION 54
eADVANCE (PTY) LTD 58
EDUCOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 60
LEAP SCIENCE & MATHS SCHOOLS 65
PIONEER ACADEMIES (PTY) LTD 68
SUMMIT EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 70

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the current state of South Africa’s tertiary education sector, the challenges it faces and the factors influencing its success. The report profiles 30 state and private universities, including the South African campus of Australian university, Monash, and 17 private college groups where student enrolments have increased to approximately 100,000. Profiled are the Tertiary School in Business Administration (TSiBA), a unique private, not-for-profit business school that gives emerging leaders an opportunity to study high quality, accredited academic courses, as well as the Independent Institute of Education (Pty) Ltd , which incorporates the tertiary segment of AdvTech, already a leading private provider in the primary and secondary education sector.

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s higher education sector, which is still plagued by numerous problems. Despite the budget for overall education in South Africa progressively improving over the last few years, the Minister of Higher Education reported to parliament that in order to fund all new applications for higher education in South Africa, a budget of R51bn was required. The Higher Education Department’s budget, which is R9.5bn for 2015, will cover 425,095 new entrants, 28,646 more than 2014 but “a significant number of applicants will be denied access to higher education and the backlog will continue to build up, unabated.”

Strengths

• Increasing number of private institutions.
• South Africa’s higher education sector is the most diverse in Africa and attracts many students from Africa.

Weaknesses

• High drop-out rates.
• Higher education is expensive.
• The sector is not providing the skills required to grow South Africa’s economy.

Opportunities

• An expected 1.6 million students enrolling at higher education institutions across the country by 2030.
• Distance education as information technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the Internet. (MOOCs)
• Growing demand for higher education from students.
• Growth for the private sector as the demand for high quality and more varied higher education increases.

Threats

• Continuing failure of the General Education and Training (GET) sector to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Increasing shortage of qualified staff.

Outlook

At the launch of the White Paper, the Minister of the Department of Higher Education and Training stated, “South Africa needs a single, coherent, differentiated, highly articulated and yet diverse, non-racial, post-school education and training system with all sectors playing their role as part of a coherent but differentiated whole.” However, the sector needs to overcome a number of challenges including high drop-out rates, a shortage of qualified staff, the skills mismatch in the labour market as well as a serious mismatch in the demand and supply for places in higher education institutions. All these problems are hampering the success of the sector and thus failing to provide the skills required to grow South Africa’s economy.

Read More..
The Education Industry in South Africa 2015

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Supply Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4.1. Local 8
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 11
4.1.2. Regulations & Government Programmes 11
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 13
4.2. Continental 15
4.3. International 17
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 18
5.1. Government Intervention 18
5.2. Labour 18
5.3. Economic Environment and Rising Input Costs 19
5.4. Access to Higher Education 20
5.5. Information Technology 21
6. COMPETITION 22
6.1. Barriers to Entry 23
6.2. Research and Development (R&D) 23
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 24
8. OUTLOOK 25
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 25
10. REFERENCES 26
10.1. Publications 26
10.2. Websites 26
ORGANOGRAM 92007 28
Education by Universities 28
COMPANY PROFILES 30
CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 30
CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, FREE STATE 34
CITY VARSITY (PTY) LTD 37
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 39
DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 42
MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 45
MONASH SOUTH AFRICA NPC 49
NELSON MANDELA METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY 52
NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY 56
RHODES UNIVERSITY 62
SEFAKO MAKGATHO HEALTH SCIENCES UNIVERSITY 69
SOL PLAATJE UNIVERSITY 71
TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 72
UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN 75
UNIVERSITY OF FORT HARE 78
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG 82
UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL 86
UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO 90
UNIVERSITY OF MPUMALANGA 93
UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA 95
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA 99
UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH 105
UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE 109
UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE 112
UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND 115
UNIVERSITY OF VENDA (UNIVEN) 119
UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND (THE) 123
VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 126
WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY 128
ORGANOGRAM 92008 131
Education by Correspondence and Private Vocational Colleges 131
COMPANY PROFILES 132
ADVTECH LTD 132
BOSTON CITY CAMPUS AND BUSINESS COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 136
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 140
BUSINESS SCHOOL OF SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD (THE) 141
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 142
DAMELIN (PTY) LTD 145
EDUCOR HOLDINGS LTD 147
FOSTER-MELLIAR (PTY) LTD 152
ICESA CITY CAMPUS (PTY) LTD 154
INDEPENDENT INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION (PTY) LTD (THE) 156
MIDRAND GRADUATE INSTITUTE (PTY) LTD 158
MILPARK EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 160
REGENESYS MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 162
REGENT BUSINESS SCHOOL (PTY) LTD 164
RICHFIELD GRADUATE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 166
SA SCHOOL OF MOTION PICTURE MEDIUM AND LIVE PERFORMANCE (PTY) LTD (THE) 168
TSIBA EDUCATION 171

Report Coverage

This report focuses on South Africa’s primary and secondary education sectors, factors influencing their success and the opportunities for growth in the private education sector. The report also profiles the Department of Education as well as seven of the major independent educational groups, including the sector leaders Curro Holdings Ltd, which currently has 42 registered schools and AdvTech Ltd which spent R2bn acquiring and expanding schools in 2014.

Introduction

In 2013/2014 the South African government spent R227bn on education, which is equivalent to 6.5% of GDP and 19.7% of total government expenditure. Despite the government allocating R19.68bn for 2014/15 to the Department of Basic Education (DBE) compared to R17.592bn for 2013/14, the education system remains in crisis and is confronted by numerous challenges, including a high drop-out rate, inadequate content knowledge of many teachers and poor English, Science and Mathematics results. This report focuses on South Africa’s primary and secondary education sectors and the opportunities for growth in the private education sector.

Strengths

• A thriving, effective independent school sector which includes low-fee private schools.
• Education is one of government's priority sectors and R19.68bn has been allocated to the DBE for the 2014/2015 financial year.

Weaknesses

• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• Lack of ICT-related knowledge among many South African teachers in public schools.
• The quality of education in many South African public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in Literacy, Mathematics and Science.

Opportunities

• Growth for private schools as long as the public schooling system remains in crisis.
• Improvement in the quality of teaching as a result of the re-introduction of teacher training colleges.

Threats

• Continued shortage of teachers, especially in Maths and Science.
• Education will suffer further if CAPS is as unsuccessful as OBE.

Outlook

University of Stellenbosch Economics Professor, Servaas van der Berg reiterated, “Education is a critical determinant of success in the job market and the failure of the school system is central to the failure to increase employment and reduce inequality.” Even with the increase in the Department of Basic Education’s 2014/2015 budget to R19.68bn, many stakeholders believe that improvement in the overall quality of education will take many years, and there were differing opinions about how successful the new CAPS system is likely to be. The poor performance of the public school sector has however, provided opportunities for growth in the private school education sector, which is expected to continue increasing as more parents opt to send their children to private schools.

Read More..
The Education Industry in South Africa 2015

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 10
4.1. Local 10
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 18
4.1.2. Regulations 18
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 20
4.2. Continental 20
4.3. International 21
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 22
5.1. Government Intervention 22
5.2. Economic Environment 23
5.3. Poverty and Lack of Resources 24
5.4. Language Barriers 24
5.5. Access to Quality Early Childhood Development Facilities 25
5.6. Information Technology 25
5.7. Labour 26
5.8. Poor School Management 29
6. COMPETITION 30
6.1. Barriers to Entry 30
6.2. Research and Development (R&D) 31
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 32
8. OUTLOOK 32
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 33
10. REFERENCES 34
10.1. Publications 34
10.2. Websites 34
APPENDIX 1 36
Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET). 36
APPENDIX 2 37
Outcomes Based Education (Obe) and Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) 37
ORGANOGRAM 39
COMPANY PROFILES 40
ADVTECH LTD 40
BASA EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE TRUST 44
CURRO HOLDINGS LTD 46
DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION 49
eADVANCE (PTY) LTD 56
EDUCOR HOLDINGS LTD 58
LEAP SCIENCE & MATHS SCHOOLS 63
SUMMIT EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 66

Introduction

The need for an effective higher and further education and training sector is essential if South Africa is to achieve its 2030 vision outlined in the National Development Plan (NDP). However, despite spending about 20% of its government budget or 6.4% of gross domestic product (GDP) on education, Prof MS Makhanya, Principal and Vice Chancellor at University of South Africa (Unisa), believes that, “The present picture of South African higher education is a bleak one.” This, according to the Green Paper for Post School Education and Training 2012, is because, “The post school system is not meeting the needs of the economy and society as a whole and training is inadequate in quantity, diversity and in many but not all instances, quality.” The White Paper, which was published in January 2014, attempts to address the challenges that face the country.

Strengths

• The need for an effective higher and further education and training sector is essential if South Africa is to achieve its 2030 vision outlined in the National Development Plan (NDP). However, despite spending about 20% of its government budget or 6.4% of gross domestic product (GDP) on education, Prof MS Makhanya, Principal and Vice Chancellor at University of South Africa (Unisa), believes that, “The present picture of South African higher education is a bleak one.” This, according to the Green Paper for Post School Education and Training 2012, is because, “The post school system is not meeting the needs of the economy and society as a whole and training is inadequate in quantity, diversity and in many but not all instances, quality.” The White Paper, which was published in January 2014, attempts to address the challenges that face the country.

Weaknesses

• High drop-out rates.
• Higher education is expensive
• The sector is not providing the skills required to grow South Africa’s economy.

Opportunities

• An expected 4.5 million students a year enrolling at universities, colleges and other post-school institutions across the country by 2030.
• Distance education as information technology becomes more advanced and there is more widespread access to the Internet.
• Growth for the private sector as the demand for high quality higher education increases.
• Increased funding for vocational and further education sector.

Threats

• Continuing failure of the General Education and Training (GET) sector to ensure that learners are sufficiently literate and numerate.
• Increasing shortage of qualified staff.

Outlook

South Africa’s higher and further education and training sector remains under pressure. The sector needs to overcome a number of challenges before the aim of the government’s White Paper to “create a framework for a diverse, integrated post school system,” is likely to be achieved. Limited resources, the skills mismatch in the South African labour market, high drop-out rates and the shortage of qualified staff are some of the barriers that continue to the hamper the success of the sector, in particular the public higher and FET divisions. These challenges, however, provide opportunities for private higher and further education institutions to expand and offer a range of FET and higher education courses.

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-04-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Geographic Position 2
2.2. Industry Supply Chain 2
3. SIZE OF INDUSTRY 3
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4.1. Local 6
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 14
4.1.2. Regulations 14
4.1.3. Black Economic Empowerment 15
4.2. Continental 17
4.3. International 18
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 19
5.1. Economic Environment and Rising Costs 19
5.2. Access to Higher Education 19
5.3. Information Technology 20
5.4. Labour Resources 20
6. COMPETITION 21
6.1. Barriers to Entry 22
6.2. Research and Development (R&D) 22
6.3. Innovation 22
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 23
8. OUTLOOK 23
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 23
10. REFERENCES 24
10.1. Publications 24
10.2. Websites 24
APPENDIX 1 26
Private Health Education Providers of South Africa (PHEPSA) Members 26
ORGANOGRAM 92007 27
Education By Universities 27
COMPANY PROFILES 29
CAPE PENINSULA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 29
CENTRAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (FREE STATE) 32
CITY VARSITY (PTY) LTD 34
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 36
DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (PTY) LTD 38
MANGOSUTHU UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 40
MONASH SOUTH AFRICA LTD 42
NELSON MANDELA METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY 44
NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY 46
RHODES UNIVERSITY 50
SOL PLAATJE UNIVERSITY 56
TSHWANE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 57
UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN 59
UNIVERSITY OF FORT HARE 61
UNIVERSITY OF JOHANNESBURG 63
UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL 66
UNIVERSITY OF LIMPOPO 69
UNIVERSITY OF MPUMALANGA 71
UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA 72
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA 74
UNIVERSITY OF STELLENBOSCH 78
UNIVERSITY OF THE FREE STATE 81
UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE 83
UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND 85
UNIVERSITY OF VENDA (UNIVEN) 88
UNIVERSITY OF ZULULAND (THE) 94
VAAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY 96
WALTER SISULU UNIVERSITY 98
ORGANOGRAM 92008 100
Education By Correspondence And Private Vocational Colleges 100
COMPANY PROFILES 101
ADVTECH LTD 101
BOSTON CITY CAMPUS & BUSINESS COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 104
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TRAINING COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 107
BUSINESS SCHOOL OF SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD (THE) 108
CIDA CITY CAMPUS ASSOCIATION 109
CTI EDUCATION GROUP (PTY) LTD 111
DAMELIN (PTY) LTD 113
EDUCOR HOLDINGS LTD 115
FOSTER-MELLIAR (PTY) LTD 117
HENLEY BUSINESS SCHOOL LTD 118
ICESA CITY CAMPUS (PTY) LTD 120
INDEPENDENT INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION (PTY) LTD (THE) 122
MIDRAND GRADUATE INSTITUTE (PTY) LTD 123
MILPARK EDUCATION (PTY) LTD 125
PC TRAINING & BUSINESS COLLEGE (PTY) LTD 127
REGENESYS MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 128
REGENT BUSINESS SCHOOL (PTY) LTD 129
SA SCHOOL OF MOTION PICTURE MEDIUM & LIVE PERFORMANCE (PTY) LTD (THE) 131

Introduction

Although the late Nelson Mandela believed that, “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world," South Africa’s public education system remains in crisis. Literacy rates and mathematics and science skills are on the decline at government schools and almost three-quarters of the 2013 National Senior Certificate students who qualified for university study did not meet the minimum requirements for the degrees that meet scarce skills. The World Economic Forum’s Competitiveness Index for 2012–2013 ranks South Africa’s overall education system at 140 out of 144 countries and its maths and science education at 143 out of 144. This is despite the fact that South Africa spends about 20% of its budget or 6.4% of GDP on education. In the 2014/2015 financial year R254bn has been allocated to education, considerably more than in other emerging market economies. This report focuses on the primary and secondary education sectors and the growing opportunities in the private education arena.

Strengths

• A thriving, effective independent school sector which includes low-fee private schools.
• Education is high on government's priorities and R254bn has been allocated for the 2014/2015 financial year.

Weaknesses

• Insufficient number of qualified teachers.
• Lack of adequately resourced public schools.
• Lack of ICT-related knowledge among many South African teachers in public schools.
• Lack of safety in many public schools.
• Quality of education in most South African public schools is poor, with low levels of achievement in literacy, mathematics and science.

Opportunities

• Growth for private schools as long as the public schooling system remains in crisis.
• Improvement in the quality of teaching as a result of the reintroduction of teacher training colleges.
• Introduction of contract schools model would provide opportunities for private providers and has the potential to improve education in disadvantaged and low-income communities

Threats

• Continued shortage of teachers, especially in Maths and Science.
• Education will suffer further if CAPS is as unsuccessful as OBE.

Outlook

With the country’s public education system failing to provide South Africa’s youth with quality education, the demand for private school education continues to increase. Companies such as Curro Holdings and Advtech have stated they will continue building new schools to meet the increasing demand and are positive that there are ample opportunities in the affordable private school sector. According to Eustace Davie, director of the Free Market Foundation, “Opening up education to low-cost private schools run by educational entrepreneurs will not provide an overnight solution to this country’s schooling problems but will set South Africa on a path to educational recovery.”

The Education Industry in South Africa 2014

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Education Industry in South Africa 2022-08-18

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $497.17 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2020-11-18

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2019-09-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2018-10-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education industry in South Africa 2017-09-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2017-07-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-06-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2016-05-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2015-06-23

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Education Industry in South Africa 2014-07-31

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

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PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Supply Chain 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4.1. Local 6
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 10
4.1.2. Regulations 11
4.2. Continental 11
4.3. International 12
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 13
5.1. Economic Environment 13
5.2. Poverty and Lack of Resources 13
5.3. Language Barriers 13
5.4. Access to Quality Early Childhood Development Facilities 13
5.5. Information Technology 14
5.6. Labour Resources 14
5.7. Poor School Management 15
5.8. Crime 15
6. COMPETITION 16
6.1. Barriers to Entry 16
6.2. Research and Development (R&D) 16
6.3. Innovation 16
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 16
8. OUTLOOK 17
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 17
10. REFERENCES 18
10.1. Publications 18
10.2. Websites 18
ORGANOGRAM 20
COMPANY PROFILES 21
ADVTECH LTD 21
CURRO HOLDINGS LTD 24
DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION 26
EDUCOR HOLDINGS LTD 30
LEAP SCIENCE & MATHS SCHOOLS 33