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footwear industry south africa

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2024

Michael Felton | South Africa | 29 January 2024

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2022

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 30 March 2022

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2019

Nina Shand | South Africa | 27 August 2019

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2018

Nina Shand | South Africa | 26 February 2018

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2016

Kim Imrie | South Africa | 15 February 2016

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2014

Kim Imrie | South Africa | 30 October 2014

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Report Coverage

This report focuses on the manufacture, wholesale and retail of footwear in South Africa and includes information on production volumes and revenue, purchasing trends and criteria, key trends and issues, notable manufacturers and retailers, corporate actions, trade and economic and environmental issues including illegal imports. There are profiles of 55 companies including manufacturers such as Bata South Africa, Bolton Footwear, BBF Safety Group, Shezi Industrial Holdings (trading as Neptun Boots) and Palm Footwear. Profiled footwear importers include Adidas, Dodo’s Shoes, Nike and Puma, and retailers include AVI, Mr Price, Foschini, Truworths and Woolworths.

Introduction

• The footwear industry faces competition from imported footwear, particularly from Asian countries with lower production costs.
• The industry is closely linked to the leather industry, which is strong and well-developed.
• Manufacturing revenue was expected to grow by more than 10% in 2023.
• The value of shoes imported into South Africa rose significantly in 2022, but the increase in volumes was negligible.

Trends

• Collaborations between footwear brands and designers or other brands.
• Customisation and personalisation.
• Digital transformation and ecommerce platforms.
• Economic challenges influencing consumer behaviour.
• Growing appreciation for locally-crafted footwear.
• Growing awareness of the environmental and ethical implications of fast fashion.
• Growing emphasis on sustainability, eco-friendly and ethically produced footwear, sustainable materials, ethical sourcing practices, and environmentally conscious manufacturing processes.
• The industry is exploring new materials and technologies.
• Transparency in the supply chain and traceability of materials
• Trend towards athleisure and casual footwear continues to gain momentum.

Opportunities

• Building a strong online presence and investing in ecommerce capabilities.
• Collaborations to create limited-edition footwear collections.
• Customisation and personalisation services.
• Educational initiatives related to footwear design, production and craftmanship, foot health and sustainable practices.
• Effective digital marketing strategies.
• Export opportunities.
• Growing demand for sustainable and eco-friendly footwear.
• The trend towards athleisure and casual footwear presents opportunities to develop new styles.
• Use of 3D printing and sustainable materials.

Challenges

• A shortage of skilled workers.
• Changes in trade policies, tariffs and global trade dynamics.
• Competition from imports.
• Counterfeit products and illegal or under-declared imports.
• Disruptions in the supply chain due to natural disasters, geopolitical events, or global crises.
• Economic factors.
• Establishing and maintaining strong brand recognition.
• Growing awareness of environmental issues raises expectations for sustainable and eco-friendly practices.
• High production costs, including labour, materials and overheads.
• Limited access to finance can constrain the growth and development of SMEs.
• Rapid shifts and changes in consumer preferences and fashion trends can pose challenges for manufacturers and retailers trying to anticipate and meet changing demands.

Outlook

• Clothing and footwear retail recorded a 10.3% real year-on-year increase in 2023.
• South African footwear retail sales are predicted to show strong growth in the medium-term, driven by young urban consumers, accessibility of international brands and access to credit.
• Athleisure is expected to show the steepest growth.
• The financial viability of footwear manufacturers is deteriorating, with above-inflation increases in electricity, transport and wages.
• The industry increased production volumes in 2022, largely from the production of cheap footwear, while the rest of the manufacturing industry remained under enormous strain.

Read More..
The Footwear Industry in South Africa
The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2024

Full Report

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1084.66 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 14 000.00(ZAR) estimated $ 759.26 (USD)*

Industry Organogram

R 450.00(ZAR) estimated $ 24.40 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2022-03-30

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2019-08-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2018-02-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2016-02-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2014-10-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
2.3. Size of the Industry 7
3. LOCAL 11
3.1. State of the Industry 11
3.2. Key Trends 18
3.3. Key Issues 18
3.4. Notable Players 19
3.5. Trade 24
3.6. Corporate Actions 28
3.7. Regulations 30
3.8. Enterprise Development and Social Development 31
4. AFRICA 35
5. INTERNATIONAL 43
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 53
6.1. Unforeseen Events 53
6.2. Economic Environment 54
6.3. Labour 56
6.4. Environmental Issues 58
6.5. Technology, R&D, Innovation 59
6.6. Government Support 60
6.7. Input Costs 62
6.8. Illegal Imports, Customs and Counterfeit Concerns 65
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 65
7.1. Competition 65
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 67
7.3. Barriers to Entry 67
8. INDUSTRY SUMMARY 68
9. OUTLOOK 69
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 70
11. REFERENCES 70
11.1. Publications 70
11.2. Websites 71
Appendix 1 – Relevant legislation 74
Appendix 2 - Summary of Notable Players 79
COMPANY PROFILES 88
Adidas (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd 88
Asmall and Sons (Pty) Ltd 90
AST Safetywear CC 92
AVI Ltd 94
Bata South Africa (Pty) Ltd 98
Bathu Swag (Pty) Ltd 100
BBF Investment Holdings (Pty) Ltd 102
Blue Falcon 188 Trading (Pty) Ltd 105
Bolton Footwear (Pty) Ltd 108
Cape Union Mart International (Pty) Ltd 111
Caprini Footwear (Pty) Ltd 113
Charnaud and Company (Pty) Ltd 114
City Express Stores (Pty) Ltd 116
Corrida Shoes (Pty) Ltd 117
Dick Whittington Shoes (Pty) Ltd 119
Dodos Shoes (Pty) Ltd 121
Drip Footwear (Pty) Ltd 123
Eddels Shoes (Pty) Ltd 125
Fashion United SA (Pty) Ltd 127
Fast Fox Footwear (Pty) Ltd 129
Footgear (Pty) Ltd 131
Foschini Retail Group (Pty) Ltd 133
Frame Leisure Trading (Pty) Ltd 137
Franco Ceccato (Pty) Ltd 139
Hi-Tec Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd 141
Holdsport (Pty) Ltd 143
HTC Stores (Pty) Ltd 146
Jade E-Services South Africa (Pty) Ltd 148
Judy's Pride Fashions (Pty) Ltd 150
Kitsch Kool Properties CC 152
L A Group (Pty) Ltd 154
Massmart Holdings (Pty) Ltd 156
MBL Retail (Pty) Ltd 161
Michelle Footwear (Pty) Ltd 163
MoreGolf (Pty) Ltd 165
Mr Price Group Ltd 167
Mr Tekkie (Pty) Ltd 173
Nike South Africa (Pty) Ltd 174
One Step Ahead CC 177
Onshelf Investment Seventy Three (Pty) Ltd 179
Palm Footwear Manufacturers (Pty) Ltd 182
Pepkor Holdings Ltd 184
Pick n Pay Retailers (Pty) Ltd 189
Puma Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd 193
Queenspark (Pty) Ltd 195
Rage Distribution (Pty) Ltd 197
Retailability (Pty) Ltd 199
Rexview Investments (Pty) Ltd 202
Shezi Industrial Holdings (Pty) Ltd 204
Shoprite Holdings Ltd 207
Smiley's Footwear (Pty) Ltd 212
Truworths Ltd 214
Veldskoen Shoes (Pty) Ltd 218
Wild Alice Collection (Pty) Ltd 220
Woolworths (Pty) Ltd 222

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the manufacture, wholesale, and retail of footwear in South Africa and includes information on the state and size of the sector, plans to grow the sector, regulation, developments, notable players and factors that influence the industry. There are profiles of 57 companies including manufacturers and wholesalers such as Bolton Footwear, retailers including One Step Ahead, Mr Price and Mr Tekkie, and local brands such as Corrida (Tsonga), Bathu Swag and Veldskoen Shoes.

Introduction

This report focuses on the manufacture, wholesale, and retail of footwear in South Africa. Ex-factory sales of locally-manufactured footwear declined by 11.8% to R5.62bn in 2020 from R6.38bn in 2019, according to Southern African Footwear and Leather Industries Association (SAFLIA) figures released in March 2021. Exports, excluding to Southern African Customs Union (SACU) members, where South Africa is just a re-exporter of imported shoes, fell by 16.8% to 2.92 million pairs from 3.5 million pairs.

Strengths

• As demand for sneakers grows, local entrepreneurs can compete international brands.
• Industry supports the development of small and micro-sized businesses.
• Industry-based training at larger footwear manufacturers.
• Several local designers have successful brands.
• The footwear industry is regarded by government as a strategic sector and is supported by the Department of Trade and Industry and Competition.
• Well-established distribution channels.

Weaknesses

• Although measures to improve production efficiency have been implemented in recent years, levels of productivity generally remain low, and technology is often dated.
• Despite the industry being well regulated, enforcement is often lacking. This has resulted in the proliferation of illegal imports, under-invoicing, and counterfeit products entering the market.
• High cost of sustainable, environmentally friendly, and vegan footwear.
• Limited investment in equipment and technology.
• National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications has limited capacity to process safety wear style applications.
• The sector is reliant on imports and is vulnerable to currency fluctuations.

Opportunities

• Increased exports to other African countries where higher economic growth is expected.
• Input materials duty removal.
• Safety footwear business expansion in the Middle East.
• Skills development.

Threats

• Cheap counterfeit products make legitimate traders’ prices uncompetitive.
• Depressed economic conditions and rising costs affecting disposable income.
• Illegal imports.
• Increasing input costs.

Outlook

The economic environment remains constrained, and increasing operating costs, financially strained consumers, and cheap imports, are expected to continue to put pressure on the industry. The footwear industry’s low manufacturing productivity is unsustainable, and changes need to be made if the industry is to survive, according to the South African Footwear and Leather Industries Association. Silvio Ceriani, group CEO of footwear manufacturer BBF Safety Group, said: “The South African economy needs robust local manufacturing companies to recover, and to survive what I’m sure will continue to be uncertain times for the foreseeable future. There is now both a legislative drive and a general atmosphere to support local as far as possible, and this will be crucial in helping drive employment and growth.”

Read More..
The Footwear Industry in South Africa
The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2022

Full Report

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 4 550.00(ZAR) estimated $ 246.76 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2024-01-29

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1084.66 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2019-08-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2018-02-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2016-02-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2014-10-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
2.3. Size of the Industry 7
2.4. Key Success Factors and Pain Points 9
3. LOCAL 9
3.1. Key Trends 15
3.2. Notable Players 15
3.3. Trade 18
3.4. Corporate Actions 24
3.5. Regulations 25
3.6. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 26
4. AFRICA 27
5. INTERNATIONAL 31
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 33
6.1. COVID -19 33
6.2. Economic Environment 34
6.3. Labour 34
6.4. Environmental Issues 36
6.5. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 37
6.6. Government Support 38
6.7. Input Costs 39
6.8. Illegal Imports, Customs and Counterfeit Concerns 41
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 42
7.1. Competition 42
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 43
7.3. Barriers to Entry 44
8. SWOT ANALYSIS 44
9. OUTLOOK 45
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 45
11. REFERENCES 46
APPENDICES 48
Appendix 1 - Summary of Notable Players 48
COMPANY PROFILES 57
Adidas (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd 57
Asmall and Sons (Pty) Ltd 61
AST Safetywear CC 63
AVI Ltd 65
Bata South Africa (Pty) Ltd 69
Bathu Swag (Pty) Ltd 71
BBF Safety Group (Pty) Ltd 73
Blue Falcon 188 Trading (Pty) Ltd 76
BMT Streetfever (Pty) Ltd 85
Bolton Footwear (Pty) Ltd 90
Cape Union Mart International (Pty) Ltd 93
Caprini Footwear (Pty) Ltd 98
Charnaud and Company (Pty) Ltd 100
City Express Stores (Pty) Ltd 102
Corrida Shoes (Pty) Ltd 105
Dick Whittington Shoes (Pty) Ltd 107
Dodos Shoes (Pty) Ltd 109
Drip Footwear (Pty) Ltd 113
Eddels Shoes (Pty) Ltd 115
Fashion United SA (Pty) Ltd 117
Fast Fox Footwear (Pty) Ltd 119
Footgear (Pty) Ltd 121
Foschini Retail Group (Pty) Ltd 123
Frame Leisure Trading (Pty) Ltd 126
Franco Ceccato (Pty) Ltd 129
Hi-Tec Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd 131
Holdsport (Pty) Ltd 133
HTC Stores (Pty) Ltd 139
Jade E-Services South Africa (Pty) Ltd 142
Judy's Pride Fashions (Pty) Ltd 144
Kitsch Kool Properties CC 147
L A Group (Pty) Ltd 150
Labora Shoes (Pty) Ltd 152
Massmart Holdings Ltd 154
MBL Retail (Pty) Ltd 159
Michelle Footwear (Pty) Ltd 161
MoreGolf (Pty) Ltd 163
Mr Price Group Ltd 166
Mr Tekkie (Pty) Ltd 172
Nike South Africa (Pty) Ltd 175
One Step Ahead CC 178
Onshelf Investment Seventy Three (Pty) Ltd 180
Palm Footwear Manufacturers (Pty) Ltd 182
Pepkor Holdings Ltd 184
Pick n Pay Retailers (Pty) Ltd 190
Puma Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd 195
Queenspark (Pty) Ltd 198
Rage Distribution (Pty) Ltd 202
Retailability (Pty) Ltd 205
Rexview Investments (Pty) Ltd 209
Shezi Industrial Holdings (Pty) Ltd 211
Shoprite Holdings Ltd 214
Smiley's Footwear (Pty) Ltd 220
Truworths Ltd 222
Veldskoen Shoes (Pty) Ltd 228
Wild Alice Collection (Pty) Ltd 230
Woolworths (Pty) Ltd 232

Introduction

This report focuses on the manufacture, wholesale and retail of footwear in South Africa, a sector that is struggling in the face of tough economic conditions and estimated to be worth R63.3bn in retail sales. The most recent statistics available show that sales at manufacturing level were an estimated R5.7bn in 2018, down from R5.8bn in 2017. According to the South African Footwear and Leather Industry Association (Saflia), local market demand for footwear was 264 million pairs in 2018, with local production accounting for less than one-quarter of demand. While local production decreased by nearly 9 million pairs or 13.3% in 2018, imports grew by 3.3 million pairs, or 1.6%. This drop in production can, in part, be attributed to a protracted strike in the industry in the middle of 2018. Employment in the industry was down 4.1% and exports declined by 16.6%.

Strengths

• Cluster initiatives leading to shortened lead times from design to shelf.
• Increased emphasis on skills and technology development.
• Institutional support.
• Popular international brands are available locally.
• Quick response retailing – in season replenishment.
• Stabilisation of the manufacturing industry as a result of government assistance.
• Substantial industry-based training at larger footwear manufacturers.
• Well-established distribution channels.

Weaknesses

• Corruption, illegal imports, illegal employment and other compliance issues
• Historically limited investment in equipment and processes.
• Inadequate upstream supply-chain capabilities (components).
• Labour market issues and unrest.
• Outdated production management, processes, equipment and technology.
• The sector is heavily reliant on imports and is vulnerable to fluctuations in the local currency.

Opportunities

• Continuing Department of Trade and Industry support via the Clothing and Textile Competitiveness Improvement Programme desk and the Industrial Development Corporation.
• Further industry government interventions (as proposed)
• Growth in online shopping provides opportunities for retailers to increase sales by offering online shopping facilities.
• Increased exports to other African countries where higher economic growth is expected.
• Input materials duty removal.
• Quick response development and in-season fashion replenishment capability.
• Skills development.

Threats

• Competition from online stores.
• Continuing illegal imports.
• Counterfeit products make legitimate traders seem uncompetitive in terms of price.
• Depressed economic conditions and rising costs impacting on the disposable incomes of customers.
• Import growth continues.
• Increasing input costs for manufacturers and retailers.
• Penetration of the South African market by low-labour-cost African states.
• Unchecked corruption.

Outlook

Prevailing challenging local economic pressures will continue to constrain growth prospects for the country’s footwear industry. Consumer spending is likely to continue to be constrained leading to low and middle-income consumers increasing seeking products that are more affordable, and this will subdue the retail footwear market through 2019. Role players see potential for footwear manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers with the African Continental Free Trade agreement which came into effect on 30 May 2019. The Retail-Clothing, Textile, Footwear and Leather masterplan is also encouraging.

The Footwear Industry in South Africa
The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2019

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.13 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2024-01-29

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1084.66 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2022-03-30

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2018-02-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2016-02-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2014-10-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4.1. Local 6
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 12
4.1.2. Regulations 12
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 14
4.2. Continental 15
4.3. International 19
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 22
5.1. Economic Environment 22
5.2. Government Initiatives 23
5.3. Customs and Counterfeit Concerns 24
5.4. Rising Operating Costs 25
5.5. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 25
5.6. Labour 27
5.7. Cyclicality 29
5.8. Environmental Concerns 30
6. COMPETITION 31
6.1. Barriers to Entry 32
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 33
8. OUTLOOK 34
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 34
10. REFERENCES 35
10.1. Publications 35
10.2. Websites 35
APPENDIX 1 37
Summary of Notable Players 37
COMPANY PROFILES 45
A J CHARNAUD AND COMPANY (PTY) LTD 45
ADIDAS (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 47
ASMALL AND SONS (PTY) LTD 50
AST SAFETYWEAR CC 52
AVI LTD 54
BATA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 58
BBF SAFETY GROUP (PTY) LTD 61
BLUE FALCON 188 TRADING (PTY) LTD 64
BMT STREETFEVER (PTY) LTD 72
BOLTON FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 76
CAPE UNION MART INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD 79
CAPRINI FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 84
CITY EXPRESS STORES (PTY) LTD 86
CORRIDA SHOES (PTY) LTD 89
DENED CC 92
DICK WHITTINGTON SHOES (PTY) LTD 94
DODOS SHOES (PTY) LTD 96
EDCON LTD 99
EDDELS SHOES (PTY) LTD 103
FAST FOX FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 105
FOSCHINI RETAIL GROUP (PTY) LTD 107
FRAME LEISURE TRADING (PTY) LTD 110
FRANCO CECCATO (PTY) LTD 113
HI-TEC SPORTS DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 115
HOLDSPORT (PTY) LTD 117
HOUSE OF BUSBY (PTY) LTD (THE) 123
HOUSE OF MONATIC (PTY) LTD 126
HTC STORES (PTY) LTD 128
JUDY'S PRIDE FASHIONS (PTY) LTD 131
KITSCH KOOL PROPERTIES CC 134
L A GROUP (PTY) LTD 137
LABORA SHOES (PTY) LTD 139
MASSMART HOLDINGS LTD 141
MBL RETAIL (PTY) LTD 147
MICHELLE FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 149
MODEL EXTENSION (PTY) LTD 151
MOREGOLF (PTY) LTD 155
MR PRICE GROUP LTD 158
NIKE SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 163
OLYMPIC-FLAIR (PTY) LTD 166
ONE STEP AHEAD CC 168
ONSHELF INVESTMENT SEVENTY THREE (PTY) LTD 170
PALM FOOTWEAR MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD 172
PEPKOR HOLDINGS LTD 174
PICK N PAY RETAILERS (PTY) LTD 179
PUMA SPORTS DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 184
QUEENSPARK (PTY) LTD 187
RAGE DISTRIBUTION (PTY) LTD 191
REBEL SAFETYGEAR (PTY) LTD 194
RETAILABILITY (PTY) LTD 196
REXVIEW INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD 199
SHEZI INDUSTRIAL HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 201
SHOPRITE HOLDINGS LTD 203
SMILEY'S FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 208
TRUWORTHS LTD 210
WILD ALICE COLLECTION (PTY) LTD 214
WOOLWORTHS (PTY) LTD 216

Report Coverage

The report on the South African Footwear Industry discusses the domestic industry, recent developments and factors influencing the success of the sector. The report profiles 57 companies including retailer, Edgars which closed its Shoe Gallery stores in 2017 citing challenging trading conditions, and Steinhoff Africa Retail Ltd (Star), a new independent company established to run all Steinhoff’s Africa businesses. The company, owner of Pep, Ackermans and Shoe City, acquired Tekkie Town in November 2016 and then listed on the JSE in September 2017. Also profiled is BBF Safety Group whose Bagshaw Footwear division is set to increase its national and international footprint following an investment of R16m into state-of-the-art moulding equipment.

Introduction

This report focuses on the manufacture, wholesale and retail of footwear in South Africa, a sector that is proving resilient in the face of tough economic conditions and estimated to be worth R54.9bn. The most recent statistics available show that the manufacturing sales value of the industry was estimated at R5.5bn in 2016, up from 4.5bn in 2014. According to the South African Footwear and Leather Industry Association (SAFLIA), local market demand for footwear is 248 million pairs with local production accounting for an estimated one-quarter of demand. Domestic exports during 2016 showed a marked improvement with growth of 28%.

Strengths

• All the most popular international brands are available locally.
• Cluster initiatives leading to shortened lead times from design to shelf.
• Increased emphasis on skills and technology development.
• Stabilisation of the manufacturing industry as a result of government assistance.
• Well-established distribution channels.

Weaknesses

• Historically limited investment in equipment and processes.
• The sector is heavily reliant on imports and is vulnerable to fluctuations in the local currency.

Opportunities

• Continuing DTI support via the CTCP desk and funding body, IDC.
• Growth in online shopping provides opportunities for retailers to increase sales by offering online shopping facilities.
• Increased exports to other African countries where higher GDP growth is expected.
• Use of CAD/ CAM technology to speed up replenishment of design.

Threats

• Continuing illegal imports.
• Counterfeit products make legitimate traders seem uncompetitive in terms of price.
• Depressed economic conditions and rising inflation impacting on the disposable incomes of customers.
• Increasing input costs for manufacturers and retailers.

Outlook

Domestic retail trade in footwear is expected to become more challenging as retailers contend with recessionary pressures, the 1% increase in VAT, rising inflation, higher interest rates and currency volatility. Consumer spending is widely expected to decline in 2018 as increasing utility costs and the high consumer debt/income ratio will continue to negatively affect consumers’ disposable incomes. However, role players believe there will be favourable growth in footwear production and locally-manufactured shoes will continue to replace imports as the speed to market of locally-manufactured shoes improves. However, given the lacklustre growth in many sub-Saharan African countries, stakeholders believe expansion in these markets could slow.

Read More..
The Footwear Industry in South Africa
The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2018

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.13 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2024-01-29

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1084.66 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2022-03-30

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2019-08-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2016-02-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2014-10-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 11
4.1. Local 11
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 16
4.1.2. Regulations 17
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 19
4.2. Continental 20
4.3. International 23
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 26
5.1. Economic Environment 26
5.2. Government Support 27
5.3. Customs Concerns 27
5.4. Delays in SABS Testing 28
5.5. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 28
5.6. Labour 31
5.7. Cyclicality and Seasonality 33
5.8. Environmental Concerns 34
6. COMPETITION 35
6.1. Barriers to Entry 36
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 37
8. OUTLOOK 37
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 38
10. REFERENCES 38
10.1. Publications 38
10.2. Websites 38
APPENDIX 1 40
Government Support Programmes 40
COMPANY PROFILES 43
A J CHARNAUD AND COMPANY (PTY) LTD 43
ADIDAS (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 45
ASMALL AND SONS (PTY) LTD 48
AST SAFETYWEAR CC 50
AVI LTD 52
BATA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 56
BBF SAFETY GROUP (PTY) LTD 59
BIG BLUE 61
BLUE FALCON 188 TRADING (PTY) LTD 64
BMT STREETFEVER CC 72
BOLTON FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 75
CAPE UNION MART INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD 78
CAPRINI FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 83
CHIC SHOE MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD 85
CITY EXPRESS STORES (PTY) LTD 87
CORRIDA SHOES (PTY) LTD 89
DENED CC 91
DICK WHITTINGTON SHOES (PTY) LTD 94
DODOS SHOES (PTY) LTD 96
EDCON LTD 99
EDDELS SHOES (PTY) LTD 103
FAST FOX FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 105
FOSCHINI RETAIL GROUP (PTY) LTD 107
FRAME LEISURE TRADING (PTY) LTD 111
FRANCO CECCATO (PTY) LTD 113
HI-TEC SPORTS DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 115
HOLDSPORT LTD 117
HOUSE OF BUSBY (PTY) LTD (THE) 123
HOUSE OF MONATIC (PTY) LTD 126
HTC STORES (PTY) LTD 129
JADE E-SERVICES SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 132
JUDY'S PRIDE FASHIONS (PTY) LTD 134
L A GROUP (PTY) LTD 136
LABORA SHOES (PTY) LTD 138
MASSMART HOLDINGS LTD 140
MICHELLE FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 146
MODEL EXTENSION (PTY) LTD 148
MOREGOLF (PTY) LTD 150
MR PRICE GROUP LTD 153
NIKE SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 157
OLYMPIC-FLAIR (PTY) LTD 160
ONE STEP AHEAD CC 162
ONSHELF INVESTMENT SEVENTY THREE (PTY) LTD 164
PALM FOOTWEAR MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD 166
PICK N PAY RETAILERS (PTY) LTD 168
PUMA SPORTS DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 173
QUEENSPARK (PTY) LTD 176
RAGE DISTRIBUTION (PTY) LTD 180
REBEL SAFETYGEAR (PTY) LTD 182
RETAILABILITY (PTY) LTD 184
REXVIEW INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD 186
SHEZI INDUSTRIAL HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 188
SHOPRITE HOLDINGS LTD 190
SMILEY'S FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 195
STEINHOFF AFRICA RETAIL LTD 197
TRUWORTHS LTD 201
WOOLWORTHS (PTY) LTD 204

Report Coverage

The report on the South African Footwear Industry evaluates the domestic industry, government attempts to stimulate local manufacture and factors influencing the sector’s success. The report profiles 59 companies active in the manufacture, import, wholesale and retail of footwear. Included are the main retailers as well as manufacturer and wholesaler, Michelle Footwear (Pty) Ltd t/a Froggie, which manufactures approximately 240,000 pairs of shoes per annum and employs 244 people. Also profiled are two new footwear groups, the BBF Safety Footwear Group (Pty) Ltd and the Bolton Footwear Group, which were formed after the acquisition of the footwear and leather division of Steinhoff International Holdings subsidiary, Kap Manufacturing (Pty) Ltd which included Jordan Shoes, Wayne Plastics, United Fram Footwear and Mossop-Western Leathers.

Introduction

This report focuses on the manufacture, wholesale and retail of footwear in South Africa, a sector that is valued at approximately R43bn. According to the South African Footwear and Leather Industry Association (SAFLIA), the local market demand for footwear is 256 million pairs but less than a quarter is met by local production. However, local production has improved marginally in volume terms and imports have decreased almost 7%, with China still responsible for 90% of all imported shoes.

Strengths

• Cluster initiatives leading to shortened lead times from design to shelf.
• Increased emphasis on skills and technology development.
• Stabilisation of the industry as a result of government assistance.

Weaknesses

• Historically limited investment in equipment and processes.
• Imports dominate the local market.

Opportunities

• Continuing DTI support via the CTCP desk and funding body, IDC.
• DTI collaboration with the FDDI of the Indian Ministry of Commerce and with China in skills transfer.
• Growth in online sales.
• Increased exports to other African countries where higher GDP growth is expected.
• Use of CAD/ CAM technology to speed up replenishment of design.

Threats

• An increase in imports.
• Constrained economy: inflation, rising interest rates, low GDP and indebtedness of consumers.
• Continuing illegal imports.

Outlook

The footwear sector is being negatively affected by the current economic climate, with low demand resulting in marginal growth in production. Manufacturers and retailers alike have reported a constrained economy and are implementing coping mechanisms ranging from a greater focus on efficiencies to moving towards stricter credit approval policies. As low and slowing economic conditions continue and the rand remains weak to the US dollar, analysts expect an increase in the use of synthetic components. However, once the economy starts to recover, stakeholders predict that there will be favourable growth in footwear production and locally manufactured shoes will continue to replace imports as the speed to market of locally manufactured shoes improves.

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The Footwear Industry in South Africa
The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.13 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2024-01-29

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1084.66 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2022-03-30

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2019-08-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2018-02-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2014-10-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 19
4.1. Local 19
4.2. Corporate Actions 22
4.2.1. Regulations 23
4.2.2. Enterprise and Social Economic Development 25
4.3. Continental 26
4.4. International 28
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 30
5.1. Economic Environment 30
5.2. Government Support 32
5.3. Labour 32
5.4. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 35
5.5. Environmental Concerns 36
5.6. Cyclicality 37
6. COMPETITION 37
6.1. Barriers to Entry 38
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 40
8. OUTLOOK 40
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 41
10. REFERENCES 41
10.1. Publications 41
10.2. Websites 42
APPENDIX 1 43
Government Support Programmes 43
COMPANY PROFILES 46
ADIDAS (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 46
ALDO US INC 49
ASMALL AND SONS (PTY) LTD 51
AST SAFETYWEAR CC 53
AVI LTD 55
B AND J MELTZ (PTY) LTD 59
BATA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 61
BBF SAFETY GROUP (PTY) LTD 63
BIG BLUE 66
BLUE FALCON 188 TRADING (PTY) LTD 69
BMT STREETFEVER CC 77
BOLTON FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 80
CAPE UNION MART INTERNATIONAL (PTY) LTD 83
CAPRINI FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 88
CHIC SHOE MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD 90
CITY EXPRESS STORES (PTY) LTD 92
CORRIDA SHOES (PTY) LTD 94
CROWN FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 96
DICK WHITTINGTON SHOES (PTY) LTD 98
DENED CC 100
EDCON LTD 102
EDDELS SHOES (PTY) LTD 106
FAST FOX FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 108
FOSCHINI RETAIL GROUP (PTY) LTD 110
FRAME LEISURE TRADING (PTY) LTD 113
FRANCO CECCATO (PTY) LTD 115
FUTURA FOOTWEAR LTD 117
HI-TEC SPORTS DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 120
HOLDSPORT LTD 122
HOUSE OF BUSBY (PTY) LTD (THE) 126
HOUSE OF MONATIC (PTY) LTD 129
JADE E-SERVICES SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 131
JUDY'S PRIDE FASHIONS (PTY) LTD 133
LA GROUP (PTY) LTD 135
LABORA SHOES (PTY) LTD 137
MASSMART HOLDINGS LTD 139
MODEL EXTENSION (PTY) LTD 144
MICHELLE FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 146
MOREGOLF (PTY) LTD 148
MR PRICE GROUP LTD 151
NIKE SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 156
OLYMPIC-FLAIR (PTY) LTD 158
ONSHELF INVESTMENTS SEVENTY THREE (PTY) LTD 160
PALM FOOTWEAR MANUFACTURERS (PTY) LTD 162
PEPKOR HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 164
PEPKOR RETAIL (PTY) LTD 168
PICK N PAY RETAILERS (PTY) LTD 172
PUMA SPORTS DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 176
QUEENSPARK (PTY) LTD 178
RAGE DISTRIBUTION (PTY) LTD 182
RAMPAR TRADING (PTY) LTD 184
REBEL SAFETYGEAR (PTY) LTD 186
RETAILABILITY (PTY) LTD 188
REXVIEW INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD 190
ROWMOOR INVESTMENTS NO 329 (PTY) LTD 192
SHEZI INDUSTRIAL HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 194
SHOPRITE HOLDINGS LTD 196
SMILEY'S FOOTWEAR (PTY) LTD 202
TEKKIE TOWN (PTY) LTD 204
TRUWORTHS LTD 207
WOOLWORTHS (PTY) LTD 210

Introduction

The value of footwear manufacturing sales is approximately R3.9bn and according to the South African Footwear & Leather Industry Association (SAFLIA), the South African footwear manufacturing sector including the downstream pipeline, provides more than 30,000 jobs. This report looks at the footwear industry in South Africa at a time of reaffirmed government support and emphasis on the retailer-driven value chain. The government and local industry are all too aware that greater emphasis on local manufacturing is required as only one-quarter of local market demand of approximately 260 million pairs of shoes is being fulfilled locally. 90% of the imported items come from China.

Strengths

• Increased emphasis on skills and technology development.
• Stabilisation of the industry as a result of government assistance.

Weaknesses

• Dependent on imported hides.
• Historically limited investment in equipment and processes.
• Illegal imports.
• Imports dominate the local market.
• Lack of skills past NQF level 2.
• Subject to exchange rate volatility.

Opportunities

• Availability of local hides as a result of the proposed beneficiation strategy.
• Cluster initiatives and initiative with University of Johannesburg.
• Continuing Government incentives assist companies to upgrade.
• Export opportunities into the rest of Africa.
• Use of CAD/ CAM technology to speed up replenishment of design.

Threats

• Continuing illegal imports.
• Growth of imports.
• Weakening economy.

Outlook

Dti minister Rob Davies confirmed that government efforts to support the TCL&F sector are working and are improving overall manufacturing output. In its annual report for the year ended March 2014, the IDC confirmed that it will continue to invest in turnaround initiatives in the footwear sector which is stabilising and expected to continue showing positive growth. Skills development and introduction of technology such as CAD CAM is expected to become more widespread throughout the value chain to allow quicker response to retailer requirements. This is a necessity if South Africa is to reinvigorate local production, “bring jobs back” and compete effectively with imports from China.

The Footwear Industry in South Africa
The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2014

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.13 (USD)*

Industry Organogram

R 450.00(ZAR) estimated $ 24.40 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2024-01-29

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1084.66 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2022-03-30

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $352.51 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2019-08-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2018-02-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Footwear Industry in South Africa 2016-02-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.04 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Supply Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 13
4.1. Local 13
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 15
4.1.2. Regulations 16
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 18
4.2. Continental 19
4.3. International 21
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 22
5.1. Government Support 22
5.2. Labour 23
5.3. Technology 25
5.4. Economic Environment 26
5.5. Rising Input Costs and Sourcing of Leather 26
5.6. Cyclicality 26
5.7. Information Technology 27
5.8. Environmental Concerns 27
6. COMPETITION 28
6.1. Barriers to Entry 28
6.2. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 29
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 30
8. OUTLOOK 30
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS & INSTITUTES OF LEARNING 30
10. REFERENCES 31
10.1. Publications 31
10.2. Websites 31
APPENDIX 1 32
Government Support Programmes 32
APPENDIX 2 34
List of Online Courses and Proposed Qualifications in the Industry offered by FDTSSA 34