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The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry in South Africa 2023

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 28 December 2023

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2021

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 29 March 2021

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2019

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 08 March 2019

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2017

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 20 March 2017

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2015

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 17 November 2015

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Report Coverage

This report on the fruit and vegetable industry in South Africa includes information on the major types of fruit and vegetables produced, production areas and statistics, distribution channels including national fresh produce markets, exports, opportunities for SMEs, and the effects of climate change, EU regulations and logistics challenges. There is also information on government support for the industry, competition authority investigations, barriers to entry and the use of technology.

Introduction

• The horticulture subsector, which includes fruit and nut farmers, vegetable farmers, ornamental horticulturists, wine producers and produce packers, generated about R106bn in 2022, with the growth in the fruit industry’s revenue being the primary driver. \r\n
• Fruit and vegetables are significant commodities in the agro-processing sector as both are high-value crops. \r\n
• South Africa exports 65% of the fruits produced, 11% is consumed locally and 24% is processed. \r\n
• Fruit is produced on over 200,000 hectares of land, yielding 5.6Mt of fruit. \r\n
• The fruit industry exports to over 100 countries. \r\n
• The industry is facing significant challenges, which include increasing demands for compliance from the international trade community, loadshedding, high transport costs, and inefficient ports.

Trends

• Growing trend of consumers eating healthier food.
• Increased investment in alternate power and cold chain storage solutions.
• Increasing demand for ethically-sourced produce.

Opportunities

• Adoption of more sustainable and environmentally friendly products, through reduced waste, and renewable energy.
• Increasing exports to Asia and the Middle East.
• Technological innovation driving efficiency in production and marketing.

Challenges

• Continuing weak economic growth.
• Effects of climate change.
• Loadshedding and unstable power supply.
• Ongoing port inefficiencies and energy crisis impact fruit value chains.
• Rising input costs.

Outlook

• South Africa has a well-developed commercial farming industry and is a major exporter of high-value fruit, especially citrus. \r\n
• Counter-seasonality to key export markets will continue to provide strong demand, although challenges such as erratic electricity supply, public infrastructure decay, logistical constraints, high input costs, unusual weather, and new regulations for exporting produce to the EU pose a threat to the sector’s profitability.\r\n
• Weather pattern changes caused by climate change, especially the effect on rainfall patterns, pose risks for farmers. \r\n
• However favourable weather forecasts are expected going into early March 2024.\r\n
• EU regulations may erode the profitability of local farmers and discourage further investments in the sector. \r\n
• Russia and Ukraine import South African agricultural products and may also affect the economic performance of the sector.

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The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry in South Africa
The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry in South Africa 2023

Full Report

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1107.22 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 14 000.00(ZAR) estimated $ 775.05 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2021-03-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

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The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2019-03-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

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The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2017-03-20

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

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The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2015-11-17

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Table of Contents

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PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 5
2.3. Size of the Industry 6
3. LOCAL 8
3.1. State of the Industry 8
3.2. Key Trends 17
3.3. Key Issues 17
3.4. Trade 17
3.5. Regulations 21
3.6. Enterprise Development and Social Development 22
4. AFRICA 24
5. INTERNATIONAL 26
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
6.1. Unforeseen Events 28
6.2. Economic Environment 29
6.3. Input Costs 29
6.4. Labour 31
6.5. Environmental Issues 33
6.6. Technology, R&D, Innovation 33
6.7. Transformation 34
6.8. Government Support 35
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 35
7.1. Competition 35
7.2. Barriers to Entry 37
8. INDUSTRY SUMMARY 38
9. OUTLOOK 38
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 39
11. REFERENCES 39
11.1. Publications 39
11.2. Websites 40

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the fresh fruit and vegetables industry in South Africa and includes comprehensive information on the state and size of the sector, key production areas, production volumes and exports. There is information on major distribution channels such as fresh produce markets and retailers, research and development and information on barriers to entry and competition.

Introduction

This report focuses on the fresh fruit and vegetables industry in South Africa, which is worth R100bn in revenue per annum, and accounts for almost a quarter of total farming revenue. The coronavirus pandemic has intensified the demand for fresh fruit and vegetables, and the agricultural sector, as a provider of essential goods, was exempt from the lockdown which began on 27 March 2020. According to Stats SA, the agricultural sector grew 13.1% in 2020 despite a shrinking GDP. Growth in the fresh produce sector was underpinned by demand from consumers for fresh and healthy products, and by the higher export prices provided by the weaker exchange rate. The citrus industry, which is the second largest horticultural industry after vegetables, gained the most, due to high export volumes, firm international prices and the timing of its peak season, which coincided with the increased demand due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Strengths

• Counter-seasonality to key export markets.
• Major exporter of high-value fruit.
• Positive trade balance.
• Strong government and private support.
• Strong research and development.
• Well established distribution channels through supermarkets, fresh produce markets, exports, and processors.
• Well-developed commercial farming industry.

Weaknesses

•  Political uncertainty and security of tenure related to land reform.
• Highly susceptible to disasters such as drought.

Opportunities

• Increasing agri-processing capacity.
• Increasing exports to Asia and Middle East.
• Technological innovation driving efficiency in production and marketing.

Threats

• Climate change.
• Continuing weak economic growth.
• Increasingly stringent export regulations in the European Union.
• Land reform and expropriation without compensation.
• Rising input costs.
• Some fresh produce markets are in poor condition.
• Unstable electricity supply.
• Water supply and declining water quality.

Outlook

As the pandemic continues, demand for fresh vegetables and fruits, especially citrus, is expected to continue growing. Favourable weather conditions are expected to have a positive effect on fruit and vegetable volumes, which will also benefit fruit exports. According to Citrus Growers’ Association’s chief executive Justin Chadwick, “the citrus industry is expected to increase its exports by another 300,000 tons over the next three years. The growth projections for soft citrus, lemons and Valencia oranges alone indicate an expected additional R6.8bn in foreign exchange earnings and the creation of 22,250 sustainable jobs over the next three years”.

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The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa
The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2021

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.63 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry in South Africa 2023-12-28

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1107.22 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2019-03-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2017-03-20

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2015-11-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 15
4.1. Local 15
4.1.1. Trade 30
4.1.2. Corporate Actions 43
4.1.3. Regulations 43
4.1.4. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 45
4.2. Continental 48
4.3. International 50
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 59
5.1. Coronavirus 59
5.2. Economic Environment 60
5.3. Rising Input Costs 61
5.4. Load Shedding 61
5.5. Government Incentives and Support 62
5.6. Land Reform and Expropriation 62
5.7. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 63
5.8. Cyclicality 64
5.9. Environmental Concerns 65
5.10. Labour 67
6. COMPETITION 71
6.1. Barriers to Entry 72
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 73
8. OUTLOOK 74
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 74
10. REFERENCES 75
10.1. Publications 75
10.2. Websites 75

Report Coverage

This report examines the fresh fruit and vegetable sector in South Africa. South Africa’s horticultural produce was worth R78bn in the 2017/2018 growing season and the sector employs over 300,000 people. A major area of focus is the marketing of fresh fruit and vegetables through South Africa’s key distribution channels for horticulture: national fresh produce markets, large supermarkets, processors, and exports, all of which are discussed in detail in the report, as are numerous factors influencing the sector’s success.

Introduction

This report examines the fresh fruit and vegetable sector in South Africa. South Africa’s horticultural produce was worth R78bn in the 2017/2018 growing season and the sector employs over 300,000 people. A major area of focus is the marketing of fresh fruit and vegetables through South Africa’s key distribution channels for horticulture: national fresh produce markets, large supermarkets, processors, and exports. The fruit market is export-oriented and is a major contributor to South Africa’s positive agricultural trade balance. Exports help to mitigate the sector’s exposure to a sluggish local economy. Ongoing water shortages, particularly in the Western Cape, have continued to have an impact on the sector but horticultural stakeholders consider the potential threat of land reform and expropriation without compensation as the key challenge to be addressed.

Strengths

• Counter-seasonality to key export markets.
• Major exporter of high-value fruit.
• Many well established distribution channels through supermarkets, fresh produce markets, exports, and processors.
• Strong government and private support.
• Strong research and development.
• Very positive trade balance.
• Well-developed commercial farming industry.

Weaknesses

• Falling number of farming units and a lack of new young farmers.
• Highly susceptible to disasters such as drought.
• Inadequate investment in National Fresh Produce Markets.
• Lack of skills.
• Relatively high barriers to entry in the retail and export markets.

Opportunities

• Formalisation of informal market, particularly for vegetables.
• Funding for emerging farmers.
• Increasing agri-processing capacity.
• Increasing exports to Asia and Middle East.
• Increasing retail penetration in Africa and growing African middle-class to increase demand for South African produce.
• Technological innovation driving efficiency in production and marketing.

Threats

• Continuing drought.
• Continuing weak economic growth.
• Increasingly stringent export regulations in the European Union.
• Land reform and expropriation without compensation.
• Rising input costs.
• Some smaller fresh produce markets in critical condition.
• Unstable electricity supply.
• Water supply and declining water quality.

Outlook

While horticultural production has stabilised following the drought of previous years, and exports are forecast to grow, stakeholders in the fresh produce sector remain wary about the potential impact of land reform. Aton Rabe, executive director of Hortgro, notes that “the outlook for the 2018/2019 season does look much better than 12 months ago” but states that continued policy uncertainty has contributed to one of the most challenging years ever faced by the horticultural industry. The Citrus Growers’ Association expressed similar concerns regarding land reform but states that it will remain focused on growing market access for South African citrus exports – with a particular focus on Asia. According to the Bureau for Food and Agricultural Policy’s Baseline Agricultural Outlook through the period 2027, barring a crash in agricultural investment due to fears of expropriation, the volume and value of horticultural output is set to steadily increase on the back of new plantations and increasing exports. However, it notes that “the current political rhetoric regarding land expropriation without compensation has already affected investment in the agricultural sector significantly” while Theo Boshoff, manager of legal intelligence at Agbiz, states that “uncertainty around land reform is likely to lead to a decline in the productivity of the sector.”

Read More..
The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa
The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2019

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.63 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry in South Africa 2023-12-28

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1107.22 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2021-03-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2017-03-20

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2015-11-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 5
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 10
4.1. Local 10
4.1.1. Trade 17
4.1.2. Corporate Actions 21
4.1.3. Regulations 21
4.1.4. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 23
4.2. Continental 25
4.3. International 26
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
5.1. Economic Environment 28
5.2. Input Costs 29
5.3. Labour 30
5.4. Cyclicality 32
5.5. Environmental Concerns 32
5.6. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 33
6. COMPETITION 35
6.1. Barriers to Entry 36
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 37
8. OUTLOOK 38
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 39
10. REFERENCES 39
10.1. Publications 39
10.2. Websites 40
APPENDIX 1 42
Disaggregated Distribution of Key Products 42

Report Coverage

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry report describes current conditions, investment in the sector and the stagnant market share of National Fresh Produce Markets (NFPMs). Statistics regarding the value of horticultural production are provided while factors influencing the success of the industry and barriers to entry are discussed.

Introduction

This report focuses on the production and marketing of fresh fruit and vegetables (FFV) in South Africa, an industry that was worth R70.4bn in 2016, and employed over 250,000 people. A major focus area is the marketing of fresh fruit and vegetables through the various channels of distribution available to producers, including fresh produce markets, retailers and processors. The industry, particularly for fruit, is export-oriented and this report deals with export growth as well as the poor performance of national fresh produce markets in South Africa itself. The drought of 2015/2016 had some impact on the sector, but horticulture fared better than many other areas of primary agriculture.

Strengths

• Counter-seasonality to key export markets.
• High-quality and -value produce for export.
• Important global player in the fruit segment.
• Many distribution channels.
• NFPMs serve as a transparent price discovery mechanism.
• Strong government support.

Weaknesses

• Decreasing number of farming units.
• Highly cyclical and susceptible to crop failures caused by disasters such as drought.
• Inadequate investment in infrastructure at NFPMs.
• Substantial barriers to entry in some distribution channels.

Opportunities

• Agri-parks and other support initiatives designed to assist small horticultural producers.
• Increasing intra-continental and global demand.
• Increasing processing capacity driving demand for lower quality produce that would otherwise be unmarketable.
• Low formal barriers to entry at NFPMs.
• Project Rebirth and other initiatives to grow the industry and NFPMs.
• Technological advancements have reduced many historical barriers to entry.

Threats

• Climate change.
• Consolidation of the retail sector could continue to undermine NFPMs.
• Continuing drought conditions.
• Rising input costs.
• Water supply.

Outlook

Despite being negatively affected by the recent drought, the South African fresh produce industry has fared better than many other sectors of primary agriculture. While having to face some projected losses and the possibility of a more challenging export market due to the drought and the relatively strong Rand, Fruit SA expects the 2016/2017 season to produce a large and healthy yield. Exports by volume and value have been steadily increasing, and the emergence of important markets in the Middle East, Asia and Africa has led industry associations to predict that export growth will continue. \r\n\r\nNational fresh produce markets have stagnated somewhat, failing to grow proportionately to total horticultural production. Unless this trend can be reversed by initiatives such as Project Rebirth, the reliability of the traditional fresh produce market as an effective price discovery mechanism may be undermined. Spokespeople at the Tswhane market are nevertheless confident that the development of initiatives aimed at addressing under-investment and mismanagement means that “there is no reason NFPMs should not regain some of the market share they have lost.”

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The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa
The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.63 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry in South Africa 2023-12-28

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1107.22 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2021-03-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2019-03-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2015-11-17

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 5
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4.1. Local 9
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 18
4.1.2. Regulations 19
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 19
4.2. Continental 22
4.3. International 24
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 25
5.1. Economic Environment 25
5.2. Input Costs 26
5.3. Labour Resources 27
5.4. Cyclicality 29
5.5. Environmental Concerns 29
5.6. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 31
6. COMPETITION 33
6.1. Barriers to Entry 33
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 36
8. OUTLOOK 36
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 37
10. REFERENCES 38
10.1. Publications 38
10.2. Websites 38
APPENDIX 1 40
Trade Liberalisation 40
APPENDIX 2 41
Disaggregated Distribution of Key Products 41

Report Coverage

This report on the local fresh fruit and vegetable industry examines the various channels of distribution available to producers including national fresh produce markets, retailers, processors and the export market. Statistics regarding the value of horticultural production are provided while factors influencing the success of the industry are outlined.

Introduction

This report focuses on the fresh fruit and vegetable (FFV) industry in South Africa. It examines horticultural production and the contribution of fresh fruit and vegetables to the South African economy. A major focus area is the marketing of fresh fruit and vegetables and the various channels of distribution available to producers including national fresh produce markets, retailers, processors and the export market. The industry was worth R58bn in 2014 and this report examines trends in production, pricing and proportionate distribution over the last decade. The report discusses the state of affairs at each distribution channel as well as dealing with the barriers to entry faced by potential players. The report places a particular focus upon the relatively poor performance of national fresh produce markets, in particular their stagnating market share.

Strengths

• A relatively transparent and efficient price discovery mechanism.
• Close proximity to potential intra-continental markets.
• Counter-seasonality to key export markets.
• High-quality and -value produce for export.
• Many distribution channels.
• Steadily increasing production capacity.
• Strong government support.
• Very large exporter of key produce.

Weaknesses

• Decreasing number of farming units.
• Highly cyclical.
• Inadequate investment in infrastructure at NFPMs.
• Increasing costs driven by the price of labour and other direct inputs.
• Substantial barriers to entry in some distribution channels.
• Susceptible to crop failures driven by weather damage, disasters and so on.

Opportunities

• Increasing intra-continental and global demand.
• Low formal barriers to entry on NFPMs.
• Processors fuel demand for low-quality produce that would otherwise be unmarketable, creating opportunities for small producers.
• State initiatives to grow industry.
• Technological advancements have reduced many supply-side barriers to entry.

Threats

• Climate change.
• Consolidation of the retail sector may undermine the price discovery mechanism.
• Crop disease, such as citrus black spot, and the potential for resultant trade embargoes.
• Dwindling water supply.
• Eskom’s supply problems and power failures have significant effects on produce.
• Increasing supply chain management on the part of large supermarkets expected to significantly increase barriers to entry.

Outlook

Local production is steadily trending upwards, given impetus by the high value of fruit exports. Already boasting a healthy and stable trade portfolio, exports are only likely to increase in future, driven by an increasing global population and a growing middle class with a taste for high-quality produce. National fresh produce markets have stagnated, failing to grow proportionately to total production. Unless this trend can be reversed, perhaps by focusing upon infrastructural investments and quality support and service, the reliability of the fresh produce market as an efficient price discovery mechanism will be threatened. Spokespersons for various NFPMs are confident that with the development of initiatives addressing under-investment that “there is no reason NFPMs should not regain some of the market share they have lost.” Further, according to a number of prominent agricultural economists, the consolidating retail sector should be closely monitored to ensure that this distribution channel does not come to dominate the others and undermine competition as it has in international markets with a mature supermarket industry. However, while the sector faces its share of difficulties, the short-term outlook remains positive; steadily increasing production, combined with inelastic local demand and a valuable trade portfolio render the sector stable.

Read More..
The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa
The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2015

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.63 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry in South Africa 2023-12-28

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1107.22 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2021-03-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2019-03-08

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Industry in South Africa 2017-03-20

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.1.1. Distribution Channels 3
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
3.1. Key Statistics 2014 8
3.2. Disaggregated Farming Units, Farm Size and Employment 9
3.3. Market Share by Turnover at NFPMs 10
3.4. Disaggregated Distribution of Key Products 11
3.5. Exports 14
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 16
4.1. Local 16
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 21
4.1.2. Regulations 22
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 23
4.1.4. Opportunities for SMMEs 23
4.2. Continental 24
4.3. International 25
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 26
5.1. Economic Environment 26
5.2. Labour Resources 27
5.3. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 30
5.4. Information Technology 31
5.5. Cyclicality 32
5.6. Environmental Concerns 32
6. COMPETITION 33
6.1. Barriers to Entry 33
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 36
8. OUTLOOK 36
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 37
10. REFERENCES 38
10.1. Publications 38
10.2. Websites 39
APPENDIX 1 40
Trade Liberalisation 40