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labour recruitment provision staff industry south africa

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2024

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 25 March 2024

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2020

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 27 March 2020

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2018

Marc Bosman | South Africa | 20 September 2018

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2015

Ebrahim-Khalil Hassen | South Africa | 21 September 2015

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Report Coverage

This report on labour recruitment and the provision of staff in South Africa includes information on the state of employment, sectors that are recruiting, trends in hiring approaches, challenges faced by recruiters and the notable industry players. There are profiles of 20 companies including major groups such as Adcorp, ADvTECH and Workforce Holdings, industry players such as Mindcorp, Primeserv, SET Recruitment Consultants and Kempston Investments, and employment initiatives such as Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator.

Introduction

• South Africa’s recruitment and staffing industry is experiencing challenges and opportunities.
• Low GDP growth, high unemployment and limited company expansion have a significant influence on the need for hiring and staffing services.
• South Africa has high unemployment and skills mismatches, and the economy did not grow at sufficient levels to realise meaningful job creation over the past two decades.
• South Africa has the highest unemployment rate in the world.
• Over half the working age population have educational qualifications below Grade 12.
• Recruitment agencies reported in 2023 that companies faced the toughest business environment since 2020, which reduced the demand for their services as many companies tried to contain costs.

Trends

• Adoption of a skills-based hiring approach.
• Companies are investing in training to bridge skill gaps and promote retention.
• Growing demand for flexible work opportunities.
• Hiring practices are changing to create a more inclusive workplace.
• Increasing use of technology.
• Jobs in the gig economy are increasing.

Opportunities

• Demand for recruitment specialising in high demand jobs.
• The gig economy offers opportunities for people without qualifications.
• The growing focus on renewable energy sources is expected to increase demand for green energy professionals.

Challenges

• Increasing number of skilled and qualified professionals are working remotely for global organisations, adding to the local skills crisis.
• Low levels of education among youth.
• Skills mismatch.
• Slow economic growth resulting in low business confidence and less recruitment.

Outlook

• The race between companies vying to secure the best candidates is intensifying.
• Recruiters are expected to continue facing a shortage of suitable candidates.
• Although there is significant demand for skilled people in certain sectors, many companies have been recruiting less due to challenging business conditions.
• The country is losing skills to emigration as well as people who are staying but working remotely for global companies.
• Recruitment companies are expected to focus more on gig economy jobs.

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The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2024

Full Report

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1046.67 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 14 000.00(ZAR) estimated $ 732.67 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2020-03-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2018-09-20

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2015-09-21

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 3
2.3. Size of the Industry 4
3. LOCAL 5
3.1. State of the Industry 5
3.2. Key Trends 10
3.3. Key Issues 10
3.4. Notable Players 10
3.5. Regulations 12
3.6. Corporate Actions 12
3.7. Enterprise Development and Social Development 13
4. AFRICA 14
5. INTERNATIONAL 16
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 17
6.1. Economic Environment 17
6.2. Labour 18
6.3. Technology, R&D, Innovation 19
6.4. Job Creation Initiatives 20
6.5. Government Support 20
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 21
7.1. Competition 21
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 22
7.3. Barriers to Entry 22
8. INDUSTRY SUMMARY 23
9. OUTLOOK 23
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 24
11. REFERENCES 24
11.1. Publications 24
11.2. Websites 24
ANNEXURE 1 – Relevant Regulation 26
APPENDIX 1 - Summary of Notable Players 27
COMPANY PROFILES 34
Adcorp Holdings Ltd 34
ADvTECH Ltd 38
Afrizan Brand Poppers (Pty) Ltd 43
Ambition 24 Hours (Pty) Ltd 45
Assign Services (Pty) Ltd 47
CSG Holdings Ltd 49
Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator NPC 53
Kamo Placement CC 55
Kempston Investments (Pty) Ltd 57
Lulaway Holdings (Pty) Ltd 59
Measured Ability Group Holdings (Pty) Ltd 61
Mindcor (Pty) Ltd 63
People Perfect (Pty) Ltd 65
Primeserv Group Ltd 67
SET Recruitment Consultants (Pty) Ltd 71
Staffing Logistics (Pty) Ltd 73
Supercare Services Group (Pty) Ltd 75
Waitre D Recruitment (Pty) Ltd 77
West Coast Personnel Contracts (Pty) Ltd 78
Workforce Holdings Ltd 80

Report Coverage

This report focuses on Labour Recruitment and the Provision of Staff, including the state of the sector and employment, performance of major players, and factors that influence the sector. There are profiles of 17 companies including significant players such as Adcorp and Workforce Holdings. Other profiles include medical staffing company Ambition 24 Hours and executive search companies such as Mindcor and People Perfect.

Introduction

This report focuses on the labour recruitment industry which plays a significant role in the South African economy. The unemployment rate of 29.1% is at its highest level since comparable data was first recorded in Q1 2008. According to Stats SA approximately 8.2 million (40.1%) of South Africa’s 20.4 million young people aged 15 to 34 are not in employment, education or training of any sort. The Confederation of Associations in the Private Employment Sector (Capes) represents more than 1,200 independent staffing businesses and more than 10,000 employees. The temporary employment services (TES) sector is criticised by trade unions for creating a casualisation of labour, where employment shifts from full-time and permanent positions to casual and contract positions. But the sector allows young people who begin their careers to gain valuable exposure, skills, references and experience with different organisations and industries, which enables them to apply for long-term employment. As South Africa went into lockdown due to the coronavirus, it was expected that many businesses would be affected and may not be able to retain staff.

Strengths

• The industry is organised and plays a role in lobbying and advocacy.
• The recruitment industry plays an important role in matching employers and employees.

Weaknesses

• Industry is unable to match skills to vacancies due to skill shortages.

Opportunities

• Technological advances drive product and service innovation.

Threats

• Large companies may continue to increase their internal capacity for recruitment and utilise jobs portals and social media.
• Rapidly emerging technologies, Internet of Things, robotics and artificial intelligence are expected to take over traditional jobs.
• Technology disintermediation may result in recruitment companies no longer fulfilling traditional roles.

Outlook

South Africa’s weak economy is expected to be further affected by coronavirus, unstable electricity supply and infrastructure constraints. The coronavirus lockdown was expected to affect many businesses and their ability to retain staff. The country’s hiring outlook will remain weak as companies struggle to remain profitable and are forced to either reduce their headcount or retain their employees. Lindy van den Barselaar, managing director of ManpowerGroup SA, said, “The South African economy continues to be affected by subdued economic growth and a sluggish growth outlook. Policy uncertainty and a high unemployment rate remain a deep concern for local businesses who are looking with caution when it comes to their spending and hiring strategies.”

Read More..
The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2020

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2024-03-25

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1046.67 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2018-09-20

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2015-09-21

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4.1. Local 6
4.1.1. Regulations 10
4.1.2. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 12
4.2. Continental 13
4.3. International 13
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 14
5.1. Economic Environment and Rising Operating Costs 14
5.2. Government and Private Industry – The Social Compact 15
5.3. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 15
5.4. Labour 16
5.5. Cyclicality 17
6. COMPETITION 18
6.1. Barriers to Entry 18
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 19
8. OUTLOOK 19
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 20
10. REFERENCES 21
10.1. Publications 21
10.2. Websites 21
APPENDIX 1 23
Summary of Notable Players 23
COMPANY PROFILES 29
ADCORP HOLDINGS LTD 29
ADVTECH LTD 34
AFRIZAN PERSONNEL (PTY) LTD 40
AMBITION 24 HOURS (PTY) LTD 42
ASSIGN SERVICES (PTY) LTD 44
CSG HOLDINGS LTD 46
HARAMBEE YOUTH EMPLOYMENT ACCELERATOR 50
KAMO PLACEMENT CC 52
KEMPSTON INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD 53
LULAWAY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 55
MINDCOR (PTY) LTD 57
PEOPLE PERFECT (PTY) LTD 59
PRIMESERV GROUP LTD 61
SET RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS (PTY) LTD 64
STAFFING LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 66
SUPERCARE SERVICES GROUP (PTY) LTD 68
WORKFORCE HOLDINGS LTD 70

Introduction

This report focuses on the complex labour recruitment industry which plays a significant role in the South African economy. The International Confederation of Private Employment Agencies (CIETT) estimates approximately 2,600 agencies and 13,000 people are directly employed in the recruitment industry, numbers which appear to be declining. Based on reported industry contribution to the skills levy in 2017, formal industry turnover was R45bn in 2017, a decline of R3bn from the previous report in 2015. Recent developments in the controversial Temporary Employment Services (TES) sector following the Constitutional Court decision on the “deeming” provision and possible implications thereof are explored.

Strengths

• The industry is organised and plays a role in lobbying and advocacy
• The recruitment industry plays an important role in matching employers and employees.

Weaknesses

• Industry is as yet unable to match, across the economy, skills to vacancies due to skill shortages.

Opportunities

• Technological advances drive product and service innovation.
• The Public Employment Service could potentially provide an important source of candidate information, provided a sound working relationship between the industry and government develops.

Threats

• Burden of increased regulatory compliance costs on small industry players may accelerate industry consolidation.
• Larger corporates may continue to increase their internal capacity for recruitment and utilise jobs portals and social media.
• Rapidly emerging technologies, Internet of Things, robotics and artificial intelligence are taking away traditional jobs.
• Technology disintermediation may result in recruitment companies no longer fulfilling traditional roles.
• The ConCourt decision and implications.

Outlook

Executive search firm Heidrick & Struggles reports that companies will have 40% less employees than current and only 30% of current employees will be permanent staff by 2020, largely due to advances in automation. New roles in areas such as data science, artificial intelligence, engineering, behavioural science, and resource management will also be filled by freelancers from the gig economy. One third of employees will either work from home or shared working spaces, influencing corporate spending on real estate and information technology infrastructure. The future direction of the agency work industry will be determined by the manner in which industry players adapt to the many influencing factors. Achieving the objectives of the social compact and solving the challenge of youth unemployment in a hostile and confrontational work environment, hampered by a slowing economy, with significant historical legacies to address, will require a herculean effort from all labour stakeholders.

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2018

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2024-03-25

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1046.67 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2020-03-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2015-09-21

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 5
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4.1. Local 8
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 13
4.1.2. Regulations 14
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 18
4.2. Continental 19
4.3. International 20
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 21
5.1. Economic Environment 21
5.2. Government and Private Industry – The Social Compact 21
5.3. Private Sector Initiatives 23
5.4. Rising Operating Costs 24
5.5. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 24
5.6. Labour 26
5.7. Cyclicality 28
6. COMPETITION 29
6.1.1. Barriers to Entry 29
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 29
8. OUTLOOK 30
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 31
10. REFERENCES 32
10.1. Publications 32
10.2. Websites 33
APPENDIX 1 35
Summary of Major Players 35
COMPANY PROFILES 42
ADCORP HOLDINGS LTD 42
ADVTECH LTD 47
AFRIZAN PERSONNEL (PTY) LTD 52
AMBITION 24 HOURS (PTY) LTD 54
ASSIGN SERVICES (PTY) LTD 56
CSG HOLDINGS LTD 58
HARAMBEE YOUTH EMPLOYMENT ACCELERATOR 62
HR SOLUTIONS FOR TOMORROW (PTY) LTD 64
KAMO PLACEMENT CC 66
KEMPSTON INVESTMENTS (PTY) LTD 67
LULAWAY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 69
MINDCOR (PTY) LTD 71
PEOPLE PERFECT (PTY) LTD 73
PRIMESERV GROUP LTD 75
SET RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS (PTY) LTD 78
STAFFING LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 80
SUPERCARE SERVICES GROUP (PTY) LTD 82
WORKFORCE HOLDINGS LTD 84

Report Coverage

The report on the South African recruitment sector explores developments in the recruitment and provision of staff, the current state of the sector and factors influencing the success of the industry. The report profiles 54 companies including The Workforce Group (Pty) Ltd which provides temporary employment services mainly for the retail and hospitality sectors and Paracon SA (Pty) Ltd, a specialised ICT resource and talent management business which in May 2015 employed 1,872 people, a total that includes 1,297 contractors.

Introduction

This report focuses on the labour recruitment industry which plays a significant role in the South African economy. The International Confederation of Private Employment Agencies (CIETT) estimates that there are 2,621 agencies in South Africa, with 3,000 branches, and that around 13,000 people are employed directly in the recruitment industry. The estimated value of the sector to the economy is around R48.8bn per annum, according to the Federation of African Professional Staffing Organisations (APSO). This report explores developments in the recruitment and provision of staff industry, which includes temporary employment services or ‘labour brokers’ from November 2013.

Strengths

• The industry is organised and plays a role in lobbying and advocacy.
• The recruitment industry plays an important role in matching employers and employees.

Weaknesses

• Industry is as yet unable to match, across the economy, skills to vacancies due to skill shortages.

Opportunities

• Better regulation of the TES sector could provide much-needed certainty on the rules that need to be followed. There is an opportunity to craft labour legislation that protects workers and provides firms with flexibility.
• Growth sectors such as exploration, mining, energy and other sectors will require recruitment services.
• Technologically driven innovation presents an opportunity for firms to re-imagine products and services being offered.
• The introduction of the Public Employment Service could potentially provide an important source of candidate information, provided a sound working relationship between the industry and government develops.
• The underlying labour dispute resolution mechanisms could settle disputes between industry and government.
• ‘Passive recruitment’, that is not active job seekers, could be an area for growth, especially in scarce skills sectors.

Threats

• Disintermediation through technology could result in recruitment companies no longer playing the roles they traditionally have.
• Large changes to legislation could provide significant challenges to operations of recruitment agencies, especially temporary employment services.
• Larger corporates may continue to increase their internal capacity for recruitment and utilise jobs portals and social media.
• Proposed legislative changes are likely to be tested in courts, and as such uncertainty in the industry is likely to prevail.
• The introduction of the Public Employment Services could replace activities traditionally performed by the private sector.

Outlook

The outlook for the recruitment industry will be impacted on by two related developments. First, large changes in the regulation of the industry are unfolding. Government, through various pieces of legislation, has changed registration systems, improved protection for atypical workers and introduced a Public Employment Service. These changes are important but are likely to be challenged by the industry. Second, with the continued rise of internet usage in South Africa, the recruitment industry will need to adapt quickly to changes. The rise of job aggregators, social media and various mobile applications to support the recruitment process indicates that new roles will be emerging. The uncertainty this generates is both around the continued relevance of recruitment agencies and the impact it will have on supporting employment. Thus far, the recruitment industry has found ways to partner with jobs portals and social media networks. Overall, the recruitment industry has navigated many challenges over the last few years and has arrived at a social compact on key aspects in the industry. Differences, however, still remain, specifically on the deeming provision in the Labour Relations Amendment Act, but should not detract from progress in the sector. The deeming provision, however, cuts to the heart of labour relations in South Africa, with legal challenges to interpret legislation likely to be a feature going forward.

Read More..
The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2015

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.60 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2024-03-25

R 20 000.00(ZAR) estimated $1046.67 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2020-03-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Labour Recruitment and Provision of Staff Industry in South Africa 2018-09-20

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.43 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 14
4.1. Local 14
4.1.1. Corporate Action 18
4.1.2. Regulations 18
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and social Economic Development 21
4.1.4. Opportunities for SMMEs 21
4.2. Continental 22
4.3. International 23
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 24
5.1. Economic Environment 24
5.2. Labour 25
5.3. Information Technology and /or Technology 27
5.4. Regulation 28
5.5. Environmental Concerns 29
6. COMPETITION 29
6.1. General 29
6.2. Competition Commission Rulings 29
6.3. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 30
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 31
8. OUTLOOK 32
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 32
10. REFERENCES 33
10.1. Publications 33
10.2. Websites 33
COMPANY PROFILES 34
ADCORP HOLDINGS LTD 34
ADVTECH LTD 39
AFRI-ZAN PERSONNEL (PTY) LTD 43
AMBITION RECRUITMENT SERVICES LTD 45
ASSIGN SERVICES (PTY) LTD 47
CSG HOLDINGS LTD 49
DAWN HUMAN RESOURCE SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 53
HR SOLUTIONS FOR TOMORROW (PTY) LTD 55
KAMO PLACEMENT CC 57
KEMPSTON TRADING (PTY) LTD 58
MINDCOR (PTY) LTD 62
NES GLOBAL SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 64
PEG HR SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 65
PEOPLE PERFECT (PTY) LTD 66
PRIMESERV GROUP LTD 68
SET RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS (PTY) LTD 71
STAFFING LOGISTICS (PTY) LTD 73
SUPERCARE SERVICES GROUP (PTY) LTD 75
WORKFORCE HOLDINGS LTD 78