Who Owns Whom

maintenance operation ports harbours south africa

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2023

Gary Phillips | South Africa | 24 April 2023

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2020

Carole Veitch | South Africa | 06 August 2020

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2016

Tricia Duligal | South Africa | 10 February 2016

Enquire about this report

Report Coverage

This report on the maintenance and operations of ports and harbours in South Africa includes comprehensive information on volumes handled, capacity, developments and performance against benchmarks. There are profiles of 14 companies including major players such as Transnet and Bidfreight, developments including the V & A Waterfront and Club Mykonos and maintenance companies including Yachtport and OSC Marine.

Introduction

• Transnet National Port Authority (TNPA), the sole landlord of South Africa’s commercial ports, and port terminal operator Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) posted a net profit in 2022.
• Yet South Africa’s ports are among the least efficient in the world and compare unfavourably to almost all ports on the African continent.
• Dry mineral bulk terminals’ cargo throughput has reduced significantly due to Transnet’s rail inefficiencies.
• The ports are characterised by ageing, unreliable and inadequately provided equipment and technology, yet they suffer from chronic capital underspend.
• Capital expenditure by TNPA has remained below budget for over a decade, causing the Ports Regulator to question its ability to undertake the necessary investments and causing stakeholders to question Transnet’s commitment to maintaining, upgrading and refurbishing ports.
• These stakeholders have accused Transnet of transferring profits from ports to cross-subsidise its other divisions.
• The pandemic, global shipping crisis, July 2021 unrest, a cyber-attack on Transnet, the Durban floods, strike action in October 2022 and the interrupted functioning of Transnet’s coal rail business have underscored the ports’ inefficiencies and need of capitalisation.
• Most stakeholders’ hopes are pinned on the planned corporatisation of TNPA to make the ports system more competitive and efficient.

Strengths

• Multi-modal transportation systems connect South Africa’s main ports and terminals to extensive road and rail networks.
• Ports are essential for the import, export, and transhipment of goods.
• South Africa is a regional maritime trading hub. It is in a strategic position on major international maritime routes and is near to African offshore oil and gas fields.
• The government, through Operation Phakisa, has earmarked the sector for development and significant resources and investment have been allocated for port capacity expansion and refurbishment, skills development and training.

Weaknesses

• Access to berthing, mooring and launch facilities is limited.
• Capacity constraints are compounded by inadequate cargo handling equipment.
• Lack of port and harbour infrastructure maintenance.
• Port equipment is poorly maintained, resulting in frequent service outages and cargo handling delays.
• Service levels are generally poor, port tariffs are high, and processes are inefficient.
• South Africa’s state-owned ports system is monopolistic.

Opportunities

• Development of a more environmentally friendly ‘green’ port system.
• Establishing South African ports as hubs for green fuels and as contributors to the decarbonising of maritime transport.
• Promotion of Ngqura as a regional transhipment hub.
• The development of infrastructure for liquefied natural gas-fuelled vessels.
• The development of smart port solutions, including the use of drones for onboard cargo deliveries.
• The expansion of the port system to include a new port at Boegoebaai in the Northern Cape and the new Durban dig-out port.
• The revitalisation of small harbours under the Operation Phakisa programme.

Threats

• Disruption from adverse weather events.
• Further weakening of the economy and funding constraints due to recessionary conditions.
• Industrial action.
• Maritime disasters, such as oil spills.
• South African ports are expected to face growing competition from other African countries where substantial investments in port infrastructure have been or are being made.

Outlook

• Recovery depends on budgeted capital being fully spent, something that has not been done for over a decade.
• Most commentators believe that the prospects of a turnaround in investment in ports will hinge on the planned corporatisation of the Transnet National Ports Authority.
• Corporatisation is expected to enable TNPA to become more efficient and productive as it operates along commercial lines and facilitate the introduction of more competition among terminal operations.
• Without the successful corporatisation of TNPA, stakeholders fear the inefficiency of the ports will persist and other African ports will become increasingly attractive for shipping lines as alternatives routes to African inland markets.

Read More..
The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa
The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2023

Full Report

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $514.98 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 6 650.00(ZAR) estimated $ 360.49 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2020-08-06

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.00 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2016-02-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.00 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
2.3. Size of the Industry 9
3. LOCAL 15
3.1. State of the Industry 15
3.2. Key Trends 21
3.3. Key Issues 22
3.4. Notable Players 29
3.5. Corporate Actions 31
3.6. Regulations 31
3.7. Enterprise Development and Social Development 34
4. AFRICA 34
5. INTERNATIONAL 38
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 39
6.1. Unforeseen Events 39
6.2. Economic Environment 40
6.3. Labour 41
6.4. Environmental Issues 43
6.5. Technology, R&D, Innovation 44
6.6. Port Tariffs 45
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 46
7.1. Competition 46
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 47
7.3. Barriers to Entry 48
8. SWOT ANALYSIS 48
9. OUTLOOK 49
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 50
11. REFERENCES 50
11.1. Publications 50
11.2. Websites 51
APPENDICES 52
Appendix 1 – Location of Lighthouses in South Africa 52
Appendix 2 - Summary of Notable Players 53
COMPANY PROFILES 57
Bidfreight Port Operations (Pty) Ltd 57
Club Bayshore Marina (Pty) Ltd 59
Club Mykonos Langebaan (Pty) Ltd 61
CPS Projects (Pty) Ltd 64
Harbour Island Master Homeowners Association NPC 66
OSC Marine Africa (Pty) Ltd 67
Port of Call Consulting CC 69
Port St Francis Property Owners Association NPC 70
Portquip Africa (Pty) Ltd 71
Royal Alfred Marina Home Owners Association 73
Southern Oceaneering (Pty) Ltd 74
Transnet SOC Ltd 76
V and A Waterfront Holdings (Pty) Ltd 81
Yachtport SA (Pty) Ltd 83

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours and includes comprehensive information on the state and size of the sector, operational performance, corporate actions and developments and regulations. There are profiles of 14 players including Transnet, the dominant player in this sector and operator of all the major ports, private terminal operators and port services companies such Bidfreight Port Operations, civil marine service providers such as Southern Ocean Engineering and marina operations including the V&A Waterfront, Club Mykonos and Port St Francis.

Introduction

South Africa’s commercial ports and harbours play a critical role in the domestic economy as enablers of trade between South Africa and its trading partners in the region and in other parts of the world. In addition to acting as conduits for imports, exports and transhipments , these transport nodes provide essential maritime services to international shipping traffic destined for other parts of the globe. Before the coronavirus pandemic upended the South African economy, around 300 million tons of seaborne cargo moved through South African ports each year. Stakeholders say that volumes will be substantially lower this year owing to the lockdown measures implemented to contain the spread of the virus. With coronavirus cases surging in South Africa, port operators are scrambling to restore supply chains and clear cargo backlogs.

Strengths

• Multi-modal transportation systems connect South Africa’s main ports and terminals to road and rail networks.
• Ports are essential for the import, export and transhipment of goods.
• South Africa is a regional maritime trading hub. It commands a strategic position on major international maritime routes and is near to African offshore oil and gas fields.
• The government, through Operation Phakisa, has earmarked the sector for development and significant resources and investment have been allocated for port capacity expansion and refurbishment, skills development and training.

Weaknesses

• Access to berthing, mooring and launch facilities is limited.
• Capacity constraints are compounded by inadequate cargo handling equipment.
• Lack of port and harbour infrastructure maintenance.
• Port equipment is poorly maintained, resulting in frequent service outages and cargo handling delays.
• Service levels are generally poor, port tariffs are high and processes are inefficient.
• South Africa’s state-owned ports system is monopolistic.

Opportunities

• Development of a more environmentally friendly ‘green’ port system.
• Establishing port operating partnerships with other African countries.
• Growth of transhipment volumes by leveraging free trade zones.
• Port Elizabeth’s proposed waterfront and marina development.
• Promotion of Ngqura as a regional transhipment hub.
• The development of infrastructure for liquefied natural gas-fuelled vessels.
• The development of smart port solutions, including the use of drones for onboard cargo deliveries.
• The expansion of the port system to include a new port at Boegoebaai in the Northern Cape and the new Durban dig-out port.
• The revitalisation of small harbours under the Operation Phakisa programme.

Threats

• Disruption from adverse weather events.
• Further weakening of the economy and funding constraints due to recessionary conditions.
• Industrial action.
• Maritime disasters, such as oil spills.
• South African ports are expected to face growing competition from other African countries where substantial investments in port infrastructure have been or are being made.
• The devastating impact of the coronavirus pandemic on lives and the economy.

Outlook

With the reopening of most sectors of the South African economy, activity at South Africa’s main commercial ports is ramping up to deal with a projected increase in cargo shipments. However, the rapid escalation of coronavirus infections remains a grave threat and concerns surrounding the safety of employees could precipitate industrial action. Cargo-handling delays are expected to become longer and more frequent as greater numbers of employees are infected by the virus. Stakeholders say that the Port of Ngqura needs to be promoted more vigorously as a regional transhipment hub and that port and harbour infrastructure development projects, such as the Port Elizabeth Waterfront, need to be reprioritised to stimulate economic growth and job creation.

Read More..
The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa
The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2020

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.00 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.10 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2023-04-24

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $514.98 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2016-02-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.00 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 5
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 13
4.1. Local 13
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 17
4.1.2. Regulations 18
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 20
4.2. Continental 22
4.3. International 23
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 25
5.1. Economic Environment 25
5.2. Government Expenditure 26
5.3. Port Tariffs 27
5.4. Technology, Research & Development (R&D) and Innovation 28
5.5. Labour 29
5.6. Environmental Concerns 31
6. COMPETITION 32
6.1. Barriers to Entry 33
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 33
8. OUTLOOK 34
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 35
10. REFERENCES 35
10.1. Publications 35
10.2. Websites 36
APPENDIX 1 37
LOCATION OF LIGHTHOUSES IN SOUTH AFRICA 37
APPENDIX 2 38
SUMMARY OF NOTABLE PLAYERS 38
APPENDIX 3 42
BREAKDOWN OF JUNE 2020 STATISTICS OF CARG0 HANDLED, VESSELS ARRIVALS IN SOUTH AFRICA AND CONTAINERS INVOICED AT SOUTH AFRICAN PORTS 42
COMPANY PROFILES 45
BIDFREIGHT PORT OPERATIONS (PTY) LTD 46
CLUB BAYSHORE MARINA (PTY) LTD 48
CLUB MYKONOS LANGEBAAN (PTY) LTD 50
CPS PROJECTS (PTY) LTD 52
HARBOUR ISLAND MASTER HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION NPC 54
OSC MARINE AFRICA (PTY) LTD 55
PORT OF CALL CONSULTING CC 57
PORT ST FRANCIS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION NPC 59
PORTQUIP AFRICA (PTY) LTD 61
ROYAL ALFRED MARINA HOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION 63
SOUTHERN OCEANEERING (PTY) LTD 64
TRANSNET SOC LTD 65
V AND A WATERFRONT HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 70
YACHTPORT SA (PTY) LTD 72

Report Coverage

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports describes the South African ports sector, outlines current and future infrastructure projects and discusses factors influencing the success of this sub-sector of the transport industry. The report profiles Transnet and its two divisions, TNPA and Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) which reported turnover of R9.718bn and R9.712bn respectively during 2015 and between them employed 11,250 people.

Introduction

This report focuses on the maintenance of ports and harbours in South Africa, a sector that is dominated by two divisions of State-Owned Corporation (SOC) Transnet. As between 95 % and 98% of South Africa’s international trade is carried by sea, and with national demand for all cargo travelling through the ports system reaching approximately 255 million tons in 2015, the sector is of vital importance to the country. Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) and Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) reported turnover of R9.718bn and R9.712bn respectively during 2015 and between them employed 11,250 people. Over the years however, there has been a lack of investment into infrastructure which has resulted in “serious operational deficiencies.” Benchmarking studies have also found that efficiency levels and the standard of services provided by the local ports authority are expensive and fall below international standards.

Strengths

• Ports are essential for the import and export of goods.
• The ports sector is supported by Government policy and infrastructure programmes.

Weaknesses

• High tariffs and low productivity compared to global standards.
• There is a shortage of skilled labour.
• Under-investment over the years.
• Very little competition in the sector.

Opportunities

• Becoming a transhipment hub for sub-Saharan Africa and a gateway into the rest of Africa.
• Catering for the increased volumes of grain that has to be imported as a result of the drought.
• The huge spend on the country’s port infrastructure.
• The privatisation of some port services and the establishment of the PPP model to finance new Operation Phakisa infrastructure.
• The provision of repair, maintenance and support services to the African Oil & Gas industry.

Threats

• Diminishing revenue as a result of recessionary conditions.
• Further weakening of the economy.
• Lack of capacity to deal with increased imports.

Outlook

Although the third year of the MDS was described by Transnet as “challenging”, stakeholders expressed optimism at the progress that has been made to date in the local ports sector. Despite a setback in the awarding of the tender for design, construction and operation of a new Durban cruise terminal, other large infrastructure programmes that form part of the MDS and Operation Phakisa are going ahead. TNPA’s investment into ports, which is projected to reach R56bn over the next ten years, is expected to ensure that South Africa’s ports cope with the increased volumes of imported goods into the country and sub-Saharan Africa.

Read More..
The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa
The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.00 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 72.10 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2023-04-24

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $514.98 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Maintenance and Operation of Ports and Harbours in South Africa 2020-08-06

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $103.00 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4.1. Local 9
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 13
4.1.2. Regulations 14
4.2. Continental 16
4.3. International 19
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 20
5.1. Economic Environment 20
5.2. High Port Tariffs and low Productivity 21
5.3. Information Technology 23
5.4. Labour Resources 23
5.5. Environmental Concerns 24
6. COMPETITION 25
6.1. Barriers to Entry 26
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 27
8. OUTLOOK 27
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 28
10. REFERENCES 28
10.1. Publications and Presentations 28
10.2. Websites 29
COMPANY PROFILES 30
TRANSNET SOC LTD 30