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Maritime Transport Marine Manufacturing Industry South Africa

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2021

Carole Veitch | South Africa | 16 July 2021

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2019

Carole Veitch | South Africa | 16 September 2019

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2017

Carole Veitch | South Africa | 07 June 2017

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Report Coverage

This report focuses on the maritime transport and marine manufacturing sector in South Africa. It includes comprehensive information on ports and harbours, the manufacture of vessels, the size and state of the sector, port infrastructure and statistics on vessel arrivals and cargo handled. There are profiles of 58 companies including shipbuilders such as Robertson & Caine and Southern Wind Shipyards, international companies such as MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company and BP Shipping, local merchant vessel owner Vuka Marine and bunkering services company Minerva.

Introduction

Strategically located on the busy tip-of-Africa trade route and acting as a gateway between the Atlantic and Indian oceans, South Africa is well positioned to provide maritime services to international shipping traffic and offshore drilling rigs traversing its territorial waters. Before the coronavirus pandemic upended the South African economy, around 300 million tons of seaborne cargo moved through South African ports each year. Although South Africa does not have a large merchant fleet of cargo-carrying vessels, it is one of the most important maritime trading nations in the southern hemisphere. It is considered to be a very “open” economy, with trade (imports and exports) contributing more than 60% to GDP. The pandemic has brought into focus the critical role performed by the maritime transport industry in the delivery of medicine, food, fuel and other essential supplies, but has also highlighted the hardships facing thousands of crew members stranded at sea.

Strengths

•  Local boat builders have internationally-recognised design capabilities and a reputation for excellence and quality, especially in multihull catamaran production. Around 90% of locally-built vessels are exported.
• Government has designated locally-built commercial vessels for public procurement.
• Local boat yards and shipyards are flexible and able to build customised vessels.
• Local companies provide long-term support and assistance throughout the vessels’ life-cycle. This includes training, delivery, maintenance, spares, refurbishment and overhaul.
• South Africa is a regional maritime trading hub and is strategically positioned on major international maritime routes. The country’s eight commercial ports are located in proximity to African offshore oil and gas fields.
• South Africa moves more than 90% of all imports and exports by sea.
• The government, through Operation Phakisa, has earmarked the sector for development

Weaknesses

• Core components are not manufactured locally and have to be imported.
• Inadequate access to berthing, mooring and launch facilities.
• Local port tariffs are higher than the global average.
• Many ports are poorly maintained and require upgrading and/or capacity expansion.
• Many small players are undercapitalised SMEs with limited resources.
• Marine financing is difficult to access.
• Production is cyclical and project-based, which contributes to job insecurity.
• There is a significant shortage of people with the technical competencies required to work in the marine environment.
• With only five locally-flagged merchant ships in operation, South Africa remains largely dependent on foreign-owned cargo-carrying vessels.

Opportunities

• Blue Cape provides support to prospective investors and facilitates market access. By positioning Cape Town as an international hub for ocean sports and superyachts, the marine manufacturing value chain is set to benefit.
• Building commercial vessels for the public sector.
• Coastwise cargo transport along the South African coastline.
• Cross-sectoral collaboration of players across the marine manufacturing value chain and related industries, notably in green energy.
• Plans to renew South Africa’s fishing fleet under Operation Phakisa.
• Ship repair and maintenance operations in sub-Saharan Africa.
• The African offshore oil and gas industry presents opportunities for marine manufacturing, including companies specialising in vessel and drilling rig repair.
• The corporatisation of the National Ports Authority is expected to attract private investment in port infrastructure, equipment and services.
•&nb

Threats

• Extreme weather events and climate change.
• Macroeconomic pressures and trade policy uncertainty, which could lead to a decline in cargo volumes.
• Maritime disasters, such as oil spills.
• The coronavirus pandemic continues to disrupt maritime trade and passenger travel.
• The escalation of civil unrest in South Africa.
• The escalation of piracy, crew hijacking and other maritime security risks.
• The escalation of regional political tensions and rising geopolitical tensions globally.
• Unmanned autonomous vessels pose a threat to the job security of crew members.

Outlook

The South African maritime transport and marine manufacturing sector continues to be severely affected by the coronavirus pandemic and the recent civil unrest. Role players are anticipating further cargo-handling delays, supply chain disruptions and staff shortages. A critical challenge is the stranding of crew members, a number of whom have not set foot on shore in over a year. Other urgent challenges include the requirement to cut carbon emissions and transition to cleaner energy systems. While the sector’s future prospects appear bleak over the short to medium term, industry sources say that the industry is resilient and there are opportunities for growth. These include the Blue Cape initiative, which offers opportunities in the marine manufacturing and ocean sports segments, and the corporatisation of the National Ports Authority, which is expected to attract greater investment in port infrastructure and equipment.

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Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2021

Full Report

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $339.32 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 4 550.00(ZAR) estimated $ 237.52 (USD)*

Industry Organograms

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Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2019-09-16

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

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Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2017-06-07

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 6
2.2. Geographic Position 9
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 13
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 20
4.1. Local 20
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 27
4.1.2. Regulations 28
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Socio-Economic Development 34
4.2. Continental 36
4.3. International 40
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 45
5.1. Coronavirus 45
5.2. Economic Environment 46
5.3. Input Costs 47
5.4. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 49
5.5. Government Interventions 52
5.6. Environmental Concerns 54
5.7. Labour 58
5.8. Off-shore Oil and Gas 60
5.9. Piracy 61
6. COMPETITION 62
6.1. Barriers to Entry 64
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 64
8. OUTLOOK 66
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS AND OTHER ENTITIES 67
10. REFERENCES 68
10.1. Publications 68
10.2. Websites 69
APPENDIX 1 72
Summary of Vessel Arrivals at South African Ports: 01 January 2020 – 31 December 2020 72
APPENDIX 2 75
Summary of Cargo Handled at South African Ports: January - December 2020 (expressed in tons) 75
APPENDIX 3 77
Summary of Containerised Cargo Handled at South African Ports: January - December 2020 77
APPENDIX 4 - SUMMARY OF NOTABLE PLAYERS 78
Building and Repairing of Ships and Boats 78
Sea and Coastal Water Transport in South Africa 86
ORGANOGRAM - BUILDING AND REPAIRING OF SHIPS AND BOATS 90
ORGANOGRAM - SEA AND COASTAL WATER TRANSPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA 93
COMPANY PROFILES - BUILDING AND REPAIRING OF SHIPS AND BOATS 96
ADMIRAL DEFENCE SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 96
ALLSURVEY INDUSTRIAL (PTY) LTD 98
ARK INFLATABLES CC 100
BAYSIDE MARINE (PTY) LTD 102
BONAKUDE CAPITAL PROJECTS (PTY) LTD 104
BRADEXIM (PTY) LTD 105
C AND M MULTI CRAFT CC 107
CAMPING AND BOATING CENTRE (PTY) LTD 109
CASTLE ULTRA TRADING 43 (PTY) LTD 111
DAMEN SHIPYARDS CAPE TOWN (PTY) LTD 113
ELGIN BROWN AND HAMER (PTY) LTD 115
FALCON INFLATABLES (PTY) LTD 116
FENN KAYAKS CC 118
GECAT MARINE CC 120
GEMINI MARINE (PTY) LTD 122
JACOBS BROS BOAT BUILDERS CC 124
KNYSNA YACHT COMPANY (PTY) LTD 125
KUNINGI TRADING CC 127
LEGACY MARINE (PTY) LTD 129
MAKO MARINE CC 131
MALLARDS BOATING INTERNATIONAL CC 132
MAVERICK YACHTS (PTY) LTD 134
NAUTIC AFRICA (PTY) LTD 136
NEXUS YACHTS CC 138
RHINO MARINE PRODUCTS (PTY) LTD 140
ROBERTSON AND CAINE (PTY) LTD 142
SANDOCK AUSTRAL SHIPYARDS (PTY) LTD 144
SENSATION BOATS AND LIVING (PTY) LTD 146
SOUTHERN WIND SHIPYARDS (PTY) LTD 148
SOUTHEY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 150
ST FRANCIS MARINE CC 153
STURROCK GRINDROD MARITIME (PTY) LTD 155
TALLIE MARINE (PTY) LTD 158
TREVWEST 24 INVESTMENTS CC 160
TWO OCEANS MARINE MANUFACTURING CC 161
VEE CRAFT MARINE (PTY) LTD 163
VOYAGE YACHTS (PTY) LTD 165
WP STARBOATS (PTY) LTD 167
COMPANY PROFILES - SEA AND COASTAL WATER TRANSPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA 168
AP MOLLER - MAERSK A/S 168
BP SHIPPING LTD 177
CHINA COSCO SHIPPING CORPORATION LTD 179
CMA CGM S.A. 181
DAL DEUTSCHE AFRIKA-LINIEN GMBH & CO KG 186
EVERGREEN MARINE CORPORATION (TAIWAN) LTD 188
GRINDROD SHIPPING (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 191
KAWASAKI KISEN KAISHA LTD 194
LINSEN NAMBI BUNKER SERVICES (PTY) LTD 200
MACS MARITIME CARRIER SHIPPING GMBH 202
MARINE CREW SERVICES (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 204
MINERVA BUNKERING MARINE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 206
MITSUI OSK LINES LTD 208
MSC MEDITERRANEAN SHIPPING COMPANY HOLDING S.A. 214
NILE DUTCH HOLDING BV 216
NIPPON YUSEN KABUSHIKI KAISHA 218
OCEAN NETWORK EXPRESS PTE LTD 221
PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL LINES (PTE) LTD 223
POLARIS SHIPPING COMPANY LTD 225
VUKA MARINE (PTY) LTD 227

Introduction

Strategically situated on major maritime routes that convey substantial volumes of seaborne cargo and crude oil around the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa commands an advantageous geographic location and is well positioned to develop into an international maritime hub. In addition to high volumes of maritime traffic, there are around eighty offshore rigs in African waters that offer maintenance, repair and refurbishment opportunities for South Africa’s marine manufacturing industry. The revitalisation of the South African maritime transport and marine manufacturing industries, which collectively contribute around R56.5bn to the economy each year, continues to be driven by the government’s flagship oceans economy programme, Operation Phakisa. Although the maritime transport sector has made progress, South Africa remains heavily reliant on the services of foreign cargo vessels. Furthermore, with the advent of unmanned autonomous vessels, some stakeholders fear that the sector’s ambitious employment targets may not be attainable.

Strengths

•  Local boat builders have internationally recognised design capabilities, a reputation for excellence and quality, especially in multihull catamaran production. 90% of locally built vessels are exported.
• Government has designated locally built boats for public procurement.
• Local boat yards and shipyards are flexible and able to build customised vessels.
• Local companies provide long-term support and assistance throughout the vessels’ lifecycle. This includes training, delivery, maintenance, spares, refurbishment and overhaul.
• South Africa is a regional maritime trading hub and is strategically positioned on major international maritime routes. The country’s eight commercial ports are located in proximity to African offshore oil and gas fields.
• South Africa ranks amongst the world’s top 15 shipping nations by tonnage, with around 98% of all imports and exports moved by ships.
• The government, through Operation Phakisa

Weaknesses

• Core components are not manufactured locally and have to be imported.
• Inadequate access to berthing, mooring and launch facilities.
• Local port tariffs are higher than the global average.
• Many ports are poorly maintained and require upgrading and/or capacity expansion.
• Many small players are undercapitalised SMMEs with limited resources.
• Marine financing is difficult to access.
• Production is cyclical and project-based, which contributes to job insecurity.
• There is a significant shortage of people with the technical competencies required to work in the marine environment.
• With only five ships on its registry, South Africa remains largely dependent on the services of foreign ship owners and operators.

Opportunities

• Building working boats for the public sector.
• Cross-sectoral collaboration of players across the marine manufacturing value chain and related industries, notably in the sphere of green energy.
• Design and development of vessels, such as the trimaran, patrol boats and rescue craft, including the National Sea Rescue Institute’s innovative floating stretcher.
• Development of training, repair and maintenance operations in sub-Saharan Africa.
• Expansion of boat exports into sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East.
• Greater integration of vessels into South Africa’s tourism sector.
• Operation Phakisa offers investment opportunities, such as the renewal of South Africa’s fishing fleet.
• The African offshore oil and gas industry presents opportunities for marine manufacturing, including companies specialising in vessel and drilling rig repair.
• The establishment of the African Continental Free Trad

Threats

• Exchange rate volatility.
• Extreme weather events / climate change.
• Industrial action.
• Macroeconomic pressures and trade policy uncertainty, which could lead to a decline in cargo volumes.
• Maritime disasters, such as oil spills.
• Piracy and threats to shipping traffic in the Persian Gulf.
• The escalation of socio-political tensions domestically and rising geopolitical tensions globally.
• The impact of the ongoing trade war between the United States and China.
• Unmanned autonomous vessels pose a threat to the job security of seafarers.

Outlook

Operation Phakisa aims to maximise South Africa’s competitive advantage in the maritime sector and provide an impetus to the government’s infrastructure build programme. With the progressive implementation of initiatives to develop the sector and by making the South African ship’s register more attractive, stakeholders are hopeful that locally-registered ships bearing the national flag will be transporting around 40% of the country’s cargo by 2030. Although the oceans economy programme is driving the growth of South Africa’s maritime transport and marine manufacturing industries, some role players say that development will need to be significantly accelerated if Operation Phakisa’s 2033 targets are to be achieved. Given prevailing domestic economic pressures, international trade wars and the global oil tanker crisis centred in the Strait of Hormuz, the growth of South Africa’s maritime transport sector and marine manufacturing industry is expected to slow over the medium term. Technological disruption is set to accelerate and intensify in the near future, particularly with the introduction of crewless vessels.

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2019

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.43 (USD)*

Historical Reports

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2021-07-16

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $339.32 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2017-06-07

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 6
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 10
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 15
4.1. Local 15
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 20
4.1.2. Regulations 21
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 26
4.2. Continental 28
4.3. International 31
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 35
5.1. Economic Environment 35
5.2. Government Initiatives 35
5.3. Input Costs 37
5.4. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 39
5.5. Labour Resources 41
5.6. Offshore Oil and Gas 44
5.7. Piracy 45
5.8. Environmental Concerns 45
5.9. Cyclicality 48
6. COMPETITION 48
6.1. Barriers to Entry 50
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 51
8. OUTLOOK 52
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS AND AFFILIATES 53
10. REFERENCES 54
10.1. Publications 54
10.2. Websites 55
APPENDIX 1 59
Main Components and Services Supplied by the Marine Equipment Supply Chain 59
APPENDIX 2 61
Summary of Cargo Handled at South African Ports during the 2018 Calendar Year 61
APPENDIX 3 - SUMMARY OF NOTABLE PLAYERS 62
Building and Repairing of Ships and Boats 62
Sea and Coastal Water Transport in South Africa 66
APPENDIX 4 70
Members of the South African Association of Ship Owners and Agents (SAASOA) - 2019 70
COMPANY PROFILES - BUILDING AND REPAIRING OF SHIPS AND BOATS 73
ADMIRAL DEFENCE SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 73
ALLSURVEY INDUSTRIAL (PTY) LTD 75
ARK INFLATABLES CC 77
BAYSIDE MARINE (PTY) LTD 79
BRADEXIM (PTY) LTD 81
C AND M MULTI CRAFT CC 83
CAMPING AND BOATING CENTRE (PTY) LTD 85
CASTLE ULTRA TRADING 43 (PTY) LTD 87
DAMEN SHIPYARDS CAPE TOWN (PTY) LTD 89
ELGIN BROWN AND HAMER (PTY) LTD 91
FALCON INFLATABLES (PTY) LTD 92
FENN KAYAKS CC 94
GECAT MARINE CC 96
GEMINI MARINE (PTY) LTD 98
JACOBS BROS BOAT BUILDERS CC 100
KNYSNA YACHT COMPANY (PTY) LTD 101
KUNINGI TRADING CC 103
LEGACY MARINE (PTY) LTD 105
MAKO MARINE CC 107
MALLARDS BOATING INTERNATIONAL CC 108
MATRIX YACHTS (PTY) LTD 110
MAVERICK YACHTS (PTY) LTD 112
NAUTIC AFRICA (PTY) LTD 114
NEXUS YACHTS CC 116
RHINO MARINE PRODUCTS (PTY) LTD 118
ROBERTSON AND CAINE (PTY) LTD 120
SENSATION BOATS AND LIVING (PTY) LTD 122
SOUTHERN AFRICAN SHIPYARDS (PTY) LTD 124
SOUTHERN WIND SHIPYARDS (PTY) LTD 126
SOUTHEY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 128
ST FRANCIS MARINE CC 131
STURROCK GRINDROD MARITIME (PTY) LTD 132
TALLIE MARINE (PTY) LTD 135
TREVWEST 24 INVESTMENTS CC 137
TWO OCEANS MARINE MANUFACTURING CC 139
VEE CRAFT MARINE (PTY) LTD 141
VOYAGE YACHTS (PTY) LTD 143
WP STARBOATS (PTY) LTD 145
COMPANY PROFILES - SEA AND COASTAL WATER TRANSPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA 147
AP MOLLER - MAERSK A/S 147
BP SHIPPING LTD 156
CHINA COSCO SHIPPING CORPORATION LTD 158
CMA CGM S.A. 160
DAL DEUTSCHE AFRIKA-LINIEN GMBH & CO KG 165
EVERGREEN MARINE CORPORATION (TAIWAN) LTD 167
GRINDROD SHIPPING (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 170
KAWASAKI KISEN KAISHA LTD 173
LINSEN NAMBI BUNKER SERVICES (PTY) LTD 178
MACS MARITIME CARRIER SHIPPING GMBH 180
MARINE CREW SERVICES (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 182
MINERVA BUNKERING MARINE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 184
MITSUI OSK LINES LTD 186
MSC MEDITERRANEAN SHIPPING COMPANY HOLDING S.A. 190
NILE DUTCH HOLDING BV 192
NIPPON YUSEN KABUSHIKI KAISHA 194
OCEAN NETWORK EXPRESS PTE LTD 196
PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL LINES (PTE) LTD 198
POLARIS SHIPPING COMPANY LTD 200
VUKA MARINE (PTY) LTD 202

Report Coverage

The detailed South African Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing sector report focuses on current conditions and initiatives as well as investment in the sector. Profiles for 42 companies involved in the building and repairing of ships and boats are provided, ranging from the country’s largest boat builder, Cape Town-based Robertson and Caine to Gecat Marine CC, which employs eight people and manufactures two or three sports boats per year. Also profiled are 17 shipping companies that call at South Africa’s commercial harbours.

Introduction

Situated at the southern tip of the African continent, South Africa is strategically positioned on the South-South Trade Corridor, linking Asia, Africa and the East Coast of the Americas. The country’s eight commercial ports support the markets of the adjacent hinterland and also serve maritime traffic along the continent’s eastern and western seaboards. Around 80 offshore oil rigs are located within range of South African ports, offering potentially lucrative supply, service and repair opportunities. The revitalisation of South Africa’s maritime industry, which is currently estimated to contribute R55bn to the country’s GDP, has been identified as a national imperative and in July 2014, the South African government presented its vision for the development of the nation’s relatively untapped “Blue Economy”. Known as Operation Phakisa, the flagship Oceans Economy programme seeks to shore up the nation’s rapid development agenda by providing impetus to the government’s infrastructure build programme and maximising South Africa’s competitive advantage.

Strengths

• Capacity has been developed in niche segments within the commercial and public sector markets. Niche segments include building of patrol the boats, commercial RHIBs, search and rescue craft, fire-fighting boats and crew transport boats for the oil and gas sector.
• Government has designated local boats for public procurement.
• Local boat builders have internationally recognised design capabilities, a reputation for excellence and quality, with a particular strength in multihull production.
• Local boat yards have a high degree of flexibility and are able to diversify their product offerings.
• Local companies provide long-term support and assistance throughout the vessels’ lifecycle. This includes training, delivery, maintenance, spares, refurbishment and overhaul.
• Local shipyards and some boat yards have the capacity to build customised vessels with security features.
• Proximity to developing markets in sub-Saharan Afri

Weaknesses

• Core components are not manufactured locally and have to be imported.
• Highly cyclical project-based production, which contributes to job insecurity.
• Inadequate access to berthing, mooring and launch facilities.
• Local port tariffs are higher than the global average.
• Many of the country’s ports are poorly maintained and require upgrading and/or capacity expansion.
• Many small players are undercapitalised SMMEs with limited resources.
• Marine financing is difficult to access.
• The domestic boat market is underdeveloped.
• There is a significant shortage of skilled people with the technical competencies required to work in the marine environment.
• With only four ships on its registry, South Africa remains largely dependent on the maritime transport services of foreign owners and operators. Furthermore, certain outdated legislation, notably the Admiralty Jurisdiction Regulation

Opportunities

• Building working boats for the public sector.
• Cross-sectoral collaboration of players across the broader value chain and related industries, notably in the sphere of green energy.
• Design and development of innovative vessels, such as the trimaran and custom-built rescue craft and patrol boats.
• Development of Green Technologies.
• Development of training, repair and maintenance operations in sub-Saharan African.
• Expansion of boat exports into sub-Saharan African and the Middle East.
• Greater integration of vessels into South Africa’s tourism sector.
• Operation Phakisa offers a multitude of local investment opportunities. These include the renewal of South Africa’s fishing fleet, small harbour developments, building of boats/canoes for the leisure tourism market and so o,etc.
• The African offshore oil and gas industry presents multiple opportunities for local companies across the broader va

Threats

• Exchange rate volatility.
• Extreme weather events / Climate change.
• Industrial action.
• Macroeconomic pressures and trade policy uncertainty, resulting in a further decline in cargo volumes.
• Maritime disasters, such as oil spills.
• Piracy.
• The escalation of socio-political tensions domestically, as well as rising geopolitical tensions globally.
• The high cost of complying with environmental regulations.

Outlook

Since its inception in the second half of 2014, South Africa’s expansive Oceans Economy programme has made significant progress. Various initiatives have been implemented and many of these are already yielding positive results. According to official projections, the blue economy has the potential to drive new revenue growth to around R18.8bn by 2019, increasing to R177bn by 2033. The implementation of oceans economy projects is projected to create approximately 15,000 direct jobs by 2019, soaring to around 1 million employment opportunities by 2033. However, the domestic maritime transport and marine manufacturing industries are highly exposed to the prevailing climate of political turmoil and economic uncertainty in South Africa and beyond its shores. With the country’s sovereign credit rating having been downgraded to sub-investment grade by both Standard & Poor’s Global Ratings (S&P) and Fitch, attracting investment is expected to become increasingly challenging. As a result, it is generally accepted that Operation Phakisa is unlikely to drive South Africa’s economic growth rate to 5% by 2019, as envisaged at the launch of the programme.

Read More..
Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 69.43 (USD)*

Historical Reports

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2021-07-16

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $339.32 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Maritime Transport and Marine Manufacturing Industry in South Africa 2019-09-16

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $99.18 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 7
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 11
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 25
4.1. Local 25
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 30
4.1.2. Regulations 31
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 36
4.2. Continental 38
4.3. International 40
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 43
5.1. Economic Environment 43
5.2. Government Initiatives 44
5.3. Rising Input Costs 47
5.4. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 48
5.5. Labour Resources 50
5.6. Offshore Oil & Gas 53
5.7. Piracy 54
5.8. Environmental Concerns 54
5.9. Cyclicality 57
6. COMPETITION 58
6.1. Barriers to Entry 59
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 59
8. OUTLOOK 62
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS AND AFFILIATES 62
10. REFERENCES 65
10.1. Publications 65
10.2. Websites 67
APPENDIX 1 70
Main Components and Services supplied by the Marine Equipment Supply Chain 70
APPENDIX 2 72
Summary of Cargo Handled at South African Ports during the Month of April 2017 72
APPENDIX 3 73
Summary of Containers Invoiced at South African Ports during the month of April 2017 73
APPENDIX 4 74
Summary of Vessel Arrivals at South African Ports during the Month of April 2017 74
APPENDIX 5 75
Members of the South African Association of Ship Owners and Agents (SAASOA) 75
COMPANY PROFILES – BUILDING AND REPAIRING OF BOATS 77
ADMIRAL DEFENCE SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 77
ALLSURVEY INDUSTRIAL (PTY) LTD 79
ARK INFLATABLES CC 81
BAYSIDE MARINE (PTY) LTD 83
BRADEXIM (PTY) LTD 85
C AND M MULTI CRAFT CC 87
CAMPING AND BOATING CENTRE (PTY) LTD 89
CASTLE ULTRA TRADING 43 (PTY) LTD 91
CRUISER CATS (PTY) LTD 93
DAMEN SHIPYARDS CAPE TOWN (PTY) LTD 95
DCD MARINE CAPE TOWN (PTY) LTD 97
ELGIN BROWN AND HAMER (PTY) LTD 99
FALCON INFLATABLES (PTY) LTD 101
FENN KAYAKS CC 103
GECAT MARINE CC 105
GEMINI MARINE (PTY) LTD 107
JACOBS BROS BOAT BUILDERS CC 109
KNYSNA YACHT COMPANY (PTY) LTD 110
KUNINGI TRADING CC 112
LEGACY MARINE (PTY) LTD 114
MAKO MARINE CC 116
MALLARDS BOATING INTERNATIONAL CC 117
MATRIX YACHTS (PTY) LTD 119
MAVERICK YACHTS (PTY) LTD 121
NAUTIC AFRICA (PTY) LTD 123
NEXUS YACHTS CC 126
PAGE AND GOVENDER MARINE CC 128
RHINO MARINE PRODUCTS (PTY) LTD 130
ROBERTSON AND CAINE (PTY) LTD 132
SENSATION BOATS AND LIVING (PTY) LTD 134
SOUTHERN AFRICAN SHIPYARDS (PTY) LTD 136
SOUTHEY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 138
ST FRANCIS MARINE CC 141
STEALTH YACHTS (PTY) LTD 142
STURROCK GRINDROD MARITIME (PTY) LTD 144
TAG YACHTS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 146
TALLIE MARINE (PTY) LTD 148
TREVWEST 24 INVESTMENTS CC 150
TWO OCEANS MARINE MANUFACTURING CC 152
VOYAGE YACHTS (PTY) LTD 154
WHISPER ACADEMY 156
WP STARBOATS (PTY) LTD 157
COMPANY PROFILES – SEA AND COASTAL WATER TRANSPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA 158
AEGEAN BUNKERING MARINE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 158
AP MOLLER - MAERSK A/S 160
BP SHIPPING LTD 171
CHINA COSCO SHIPPING CORPORATION LTD 172
CMA CGM SA 174
DAL GERMAN AFRIKA-LINIEN GMBH & CO KG 176
EVERGREEN MARINE CORPORATION (TAIWAN) LTD 177
GRINDROD SHIPPING (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 180
KAWASAKI KISEN KAISHA LTD 183
MACS MARITIME CARRIER SHIPPING GMBH 188
MARINE CREW SERVICES (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 189
MITSUI OSK LINES LTD 191
MSC MEDITERRANEAN SHIPPING COMPANY HOLDING SA 194
NILE DUTCH HOLDING BV 196
PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL LINES (PTE) LTD 197
POLARIS SHIPPING COMPANY LTD 199
VUKA MARINE (PTY) LTD 201