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Sale Maintenance Repair Motorcycles Parts south africa

The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa 2019

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 30 April 2019

The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa 2016

Yasmin Mahomedy | South Africa | 27 October 2016

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Report Coverage

This report covers the sale, maintenance and repair of motorcycles and parts, and the factors influencing the sector’s success, including the growing delivery sector. While there are no local manufacturers, the report includes comprehensive profiles of 18 companies including importers of major international brands such as BMW, Honda, KMSA Distributors (Kawasaki), Suzuki and Tuning Fork (Yamaha). Profiled companies that sell parts or service motorcycles include Max Motorcycle Parts, Triumph, which was appointed as the local Triumph motorcycle distributor last year, and Fire It Up, which was recently awarded the official importer rights for MV Agusta.

Introduction

This report focuses on the South African motorcycle sector, which continues to experience declining sales. All units and parts are imported as no motorcycles are manufactured locally, and the weakening rand and constrained economy are placing additional pressure on already constrained consumers. The weakening rand has caused the cost of bikes to more than double in the past two years. Revenue of members of the Association of Motorcycle Importers and Distributors (AMID) was approximately R1.42bn in 2018, down from R1.57bn in 2017. However, sales of small motorcycles under 500cc grew by 12.5% to 10,819 units compared to 9,617 in 2017. This was mainly attributed to the growth of the fast food delivery sector which uses small bikes for deliveries. There were 15,359 new motorcycles registered for road use in South Africa in 2018, compared to 23,304 in 2015.

Strengths

• Established, experienced importers.
• Support of the motor industry for car-linked brands such as BMW, Honda and Suzuki in terms of research and development and new technologies.

Weaknesses

• High costs of setting up a new franchised dealership.
• Shortage of technicians.
• There is no local manufacture.
• Very susceptible to local currency depreciation.

Opportunities

• Growth of the small bike market due to increasing demand for fast food delivery services.
• If the sector promotes the benefits of motorbikes, they can be an affordable option for commuting.

Threats

• Deteriorating economic outlook.
• Deteriorating roads and road safety could result in commuters opting for vehicles instead of motorcycles.

Outlook

South Africa’s motorcycle industry is expected to continue to be battered by declining sales as the country’s economic and political outlook remains uncertain. With all products imported, the weak and volatile rand is resulting in escalating costs of bikes and parts. Association of Motorcycle Importers and Distributors director Lachlan Harris said although BMW launched four significant new models in 2018, “time will tell if the market has an appetite for these expensive models”. The small bike sector, however could see increased sales as result of the continuing growth of online food delivery businesses.

Read More..
The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa
The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa 2019

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.63 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa 2016-10-27

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 3
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4.1. Local 4
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 6
4.1.2. Regulations 7
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 8
4.2. Continental 8
4.3. International 9
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 10
5.1. Economic Environment 10
5.2. Rising Operating Costs 10
5.3. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 11
5.4. Labour 12
5.5. Cyclicality 13
5.6. Environmental Concerns 13
6. COMPETITION 13
6.1. Barriers to Entry 14
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 14
8. OUTLOOK 15
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 15
10. REFERENCES 16
10.1. Publications 16
10.2. Websites 16
APPENDIX 1 17
Summary of Notable Players 17
COMPANY PROFILES 20
BMW (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 20
C DEYSEL 23
COMBINED MOTOR HOLDINGS LTD 24
FIRE IT UP CC 27
HARLEY-DAVIDSON AFRICA (PTY) LTD 29
HONDA MOTOR SOUTHERN AFRICA (PTY) LTD 31
HUSQVARNA MOTORCYCLES SA (PTY) LTD 33
KMSA DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 35
KTM MOTORCYCLES SA (PTY) LTD 38
MAX MOTORCYCLE PARTS SA (PTY) LTD 41
MOTO UNO RACING CC 42
RODEO DRIVE CARS (PTY) LTD 43
SMITH MINING EQUIPMENT (PTY) LTD 45
SOUTHERN AFRICAN MOTORCYCLES (PTY) LTD 47
SUZUKI AUTO SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 49
TRIUMPH SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 52
TUNING FORK (PTY) LTD 53
V - TWO CYCLES CC 56

Report Coverage

The report on the motorcycle sector details the current state of the sector, recent corporate activity and factors influencing the success of the industry, including the newly introduced homologation regulations. The report profiles 18 companies, including Honda, which has the most comprehensive range of motorcycles in the local market, and the largest market share at 17.5%. Also profiled are BMW with 12% of the market and Scooter distributor Big Boy, which was taken over by Southern African Motorcycles Pty Ltd (SAM).

Introduction

This report focuses on the South African motorcycle sector. There is no manufacture of motorcycles in the country and consequently all units and parts are imported. The industry is experiencing the worst decline in sales mainly as a result of the weaker Rand, the change in homologation regulations and a constrained economy. According to the Association of Motorcycle Importers and Distributors (AMID), the revenue of its members in 2015 was approximately R1.762bn and there were 23,304 motorcycles registered for road use in South Africa in 2015, a decrease of 15% from 2014.

Strengths

• Established, experienced importers.
• Support of the motor industry for BMW, Honda and Suzuki in terms of research and development and new technologies.

Weaknesses

• Extremely lengthy and complicated homologation process.
• High cost of stock-holding.
• High costs of setting up a new franchised dealership.
• Shortage of technicians.
• There is no local manufacture.
• Very susceptible to local currency depreciation.

Opportunities

• If the sector promotes the benefits of motorbikes, the tough economic conditions make motorcycles a more affordable option for commuting.

Threats

• Deteriorating economic outlook.
• Deteriorating roads and road safety could result in commuters opting for vehicles instead of motorcycles.
• Legislative changes such as the new homologation rules.

Outlook

The South African motorcycle industry is expected to continue experiencing declining sales because of adverse conditions: the high inflation rate; economic and business constraints; the volatile exchange rate; higher sales prices; and issues concerning the homologation of motorcycles. The industry could see growth if motorcycles are given more exposure and marketed in terms their fuel-efficiency and convenience for commuting. According to the RMI, “The Department of Transport can play an important role in providing the infrastructure and making bikes part of the Integrated Transport plan.” However poor exposure and the continued increase in the cost of motorcycles, maintenance and accessories, is expected to impact negatively on the sector’s prospects.

Read More..
The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa
The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.63 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Sale, Maintenance and Repair of Motorcycles and Parts in South Africa 2019-04-30

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.19 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 3
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 3
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
4.1. Local 7
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 11
4.1.2. Regulations 12
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 13
4.2. Continental 14
4.3. International 14
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 16
5.1. Economic Environment 16
5.2. Rising Operating Costs 16
5.3. Tolls and Transport Landscape 17
5.4. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 17
5.5. Labour 18
5.6. Cyclicality 19
5.7. Environmental Concerns 19
6. COMPETITION 20
6.1. Barriers to Entry 20
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 21
8. OUTLOOK 21
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 22
10. REFERENCES 23
10.1. Publications 23
10.2. Websites 23
COMPANY PROFILES 24
AFRICA AUTOMOTIVE AFTERMARKET SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 24
BMW (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 26
C DEYSEL 28
CHINESE BIKE PARTS (PTY) LTD 29
COMBINED MOTOR HOLDINGS LTD 30
HARLEY-DAVIDSON AFRICA (PTY) LTD 34
HONDA MOTOR SOUTHERN AFRICA (PTY) LTD 36
HUSQVARNA MOTORCYCLES SA (PTY) LTD 38
KMSA DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 40
KTM MOTORCYCLES SA (PTY) LTD 42
MAX MOTORCYCLE PARTS SA (PTY) LTD 44
MOTO UNO RACING CC 45
RODEO DRIVE CARS (PTY) LTD 46
SMITH MINING EQUIPMENT (PTY) LTD 48
SOUTHERN AFRICAN MOTORCYCLES (PTY) LTD 50
SUZUKI AUTO SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 52
TUNING FORK (PTY) LTD 54
V - TWO CYCLES CC 56