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solid waste management industry south africa

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2019

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 06 February 2019

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2017

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 12 October 2017

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2015

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 29 June 2015

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2014

Liz Kneale | South Africa | 24 March 2014

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Report Coverage

This report focuses on the management of solid waste, excluding recycling. It describes the state of public and private waste services and the factors influencing their operations. It includes detailed profiles of 20 companies including Inter-waste (Pty) Ltd, subsidiary of Interwaste Holdings, which is being bought by the French Séché Environnement, and EnviroServ, recently fined by the Competition Tribunal for colluding with Wasteman. The report also profiles companies such as Compass Medical Waste, which is involved in waste disposal for clinics and private and government hospitals.

Introduction

Waste management services are under pressure from rapid urbanisation, population growth and unsustainable consumption patterns. The department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) reports that 98 million tons of waste are deposited across South Africa’s 826 landfill sites every year. The National Pricing Strategy for Waste Management document states that the country throws away at least R825bn worth of recoverable resources each year. The high volumes of unsorted waste sent to landfill sites show that South Africans have not yet realised that household and commercial waste is a cost-effective source of raw materials. The World Bank forecasts that waste generation in sub-Saharan Africa will more than triple from current levels to 516 million tons per year in 2050. The industry needs to strike a balance between the primary need to provide basic waste management services to all communities and the need to introduce costly alternative technologies to divert waste away from disposal at landfills. The poor financial status of the local government sector, mandated by the constitution to provide waste management services, could have a negative effect on its ability to provide basic services. This report focuses on the management of solid waste, excluding recycling. The collection and treatment of domestic wastewater is covered in the Who Owns Whom report on the Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water published in September 2017 and recycling is covered in the report on Recycling of Waste and Scrap published in November 2017.

Strengths

• Supportive legislative framework, with the National Waste Management Strategy as implementation agent.

Weaknesses

• 98 million tons of waste is deposited across South Africa’s 826 landfill sites every year
• Aging, outdated, poorly maintained and inadequate waste infrastructure and technology.
• Legislation not strictly enforced.
• Skills shortages in the waste sectors.

Opportunities

• Job creation opportunities in the waste sector, including DEA’s programmes such as Youth Jobs in Waste and Youth Environmental Services and the Operation Phakisa Waste and Chemicals Economy Initiatives
• Opportunities provided by different waste streams for materials and energy recovery as a means of generating energy and reducing waste disposal to landfill.

Threats

• Lack of compliance with environmental requirements, the Waste Act regulations and standards.
• Population growth, urbanisation and the growing complexity of the waste stream which will put further pressure on poorly maintained, inadequate facilities.
• Weak financial status and wasteful expenditure at local authority level affects ability to provide efficient services.

Outlook

The CSIR’s Prof. Linda Godfrey cautions that the waste sector is in desperate need of change. “If mismanaged, waste directly impacts the health of communities, yet it also provides opportunities for improved livelihoods and reducing poverty – simply by changing the way we think about waste as a resource. This change requires a deep understanding of waste behaviour and appropriate behaviour change interventions; appropriate business models to support small business development; and opportunities to create jobs and improve livelihoods in South Africa's formal and informal sectors.” Kate Stubbs, director of business development and marketing at Interwaste, believes that the South African waste industry is faced with the challenge of improving and changing its waste disposal practice. One of the greatest obstacles in the waste economy is the current dependence on landfills. The prohibition of certain waste streams from landfill “represents an opportunity to seek relevant investment and technology development opportunities for more sustainable alternative waste disposal solutions, thereby creating a more efficient waste economy in South Africa”. Kobus Otto explains that even though the waste hierarchy emphasises the need for waste minimisation, recycling and energy recovery, “there will always be a need for waste disposal to landfill. The extent of that need will be determined by the effectiveness with which waste minimisation and recycling programmes are undertaken, and/or waste incineration and energy recovery becomes a financially viable alternative. Due to onerous landfill licensing processes, municipalities need to be pro-active in planning and developing new landfills required to meet future waste disposal needs”. This is confirmed by IWMSA which states that alternative waste management technologies certainly have their place, but the primary focus in South Africa currently should be on providing reliable and efficient basic services such as collection, recycling and re-use and ultimate safe disposal of waste on an equitable basis. IWMSA further states that the implementation of alternative waste management solutions is welcome, inevitable and long overdue especially with the rapid depletion of airspace and the lack of new landfill facilities being licenced. In addition, the generation of renewable energy from waste would also assist in addressing the energy crisis in South Africa.

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The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa
The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2019

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.21 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2017-10-12

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2015-06-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2014-03-24

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 9
4.1. Local 9
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 15
4.1.2. Regulations 15
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 18
4.2. Continental 20
4.3. International 25
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
5.1. Economic Environment 28
5.2. Rising Operating Costs 29
5.3. Operation Phakisa: Chemicals and Waste Economy 30
5.4. Compliance with Waste Management Licensing Requirements 31
5.5. Status of Local Government 33
5.6. Labour 35
5.7. Infrastructure 38
5.8. Local Government Initiatives 39
5.9. Alternative Treatment Technologies 41
5.10. Environmental Issues 44
5.11. Cyclicality 47
6. COMPETITION 48
6.1. Barriers to Entry 49
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 50
8. OUTLOOK 51
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 52
10. REFERENCES 52
10.1. Publications 52
10.2. Websites 54
APPENDIX 1 55
Summary of Notable Players 55
APPENDIX 2 59
IBISWorld Market Research: Findings on the Waste Management Industry (Private Sector) 59
APPENDIX 3 62
Operation Phakisa Waste and Chemicals Economy Initiatives Across Four Workstreams 62
COMPANY PROFILES 63
AVERDA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 63
COMPASS MEDICAL WASTE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 66
CONSOLIDATED WASTE (PTY) LTD 68
DONT WASTE GROUP (PTY) LTD 70
DRIZIT ENVIRONMENTAL (PTY) LTD 72
DSW CLEANSING AND SOLID WASTE (DIV OF ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY) 74
DUMPIT S A WASTE REMOVAL (PTY) LTD 76
ENVIROSERV WASTE MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 78
ESKOM ROTEK INDUSTRIES SOC LTD 82
INTER-WASTE (PTY) LTD 85
JOBE ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 88
ORICOL ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES (PTY) LTD 90
PIKITUP JOHANNESBURG SOC LTD 92
RAPID SPILL RESPONSE CC 95
ROYAL HASKONINGDHV (PTY) LTD 97
TEDCOR GROUP (PTY) LTD 100
WASTE GROUP (PTY) LTD (THE) 102
WASTE-MART (PTY) LTD 105
WASTEPLAN (PTY) LTD 107
WATER AND WASTE SERVICES (DIVISION OF CITY OF CAPE TOWN) 109

Report Coverage

The detailed report on the management of solid waste in South Africa examines current conditions and developments as well as factors that influence the success of the sector. Profiles are provided for 21 companies including global waste management group Averda which announced the acquisition of Solid Waste Technologies (SWT), a healthcare medical waste company, in February 2017. The acquisition of SWT alongside SharpMed, acquired in 2016, makes Averda one of the largest and most comprehensive end-to-end healthcare waste management businesses in South Africa. Also profiled are smaller role players such as Rapid Spill Response CC and Jobe Environmental Systems (Pty) Ltd.

Introduction

South Africa and its major metropolitan municipalities are facing one of their biggest challenges as more and more people come to live in cities putting a strain on infrastructure and service delivery in terms of solid waste management. Although updated information on the current scale and status of the solid waste management sector is not available from the Department of Environmental Affairs, the Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa (IWMSA) confirmed that there has been “an increased focus on resource recovery in Southern Africa’s waste management landscape. Moving away from landfilling towards recycling, waste disposal alternatives and waste-to-energy initiatives, the industry at large is embarking on waste as a resource to ultimately lighten the load on the ever-decreasing landfill airspace.” This report focuses on the management of solid waste, excluding recycling, while the collection and treatment of domestic wastewater, included in this siccode, is covered in the Who Owns Whom Report on the Collection, Purification, Testing and Distribution of Water published in September 2017.

Strengths

• Department of Science and Technology Waste R&D project in support of a green economy and the national system of innovation.
• Supportive legislative framework, with the National Waste Management Strategy as implementation agent.

Weaknesses

• 90% of waste generated was still being disposed of to landfill in 2011.
• Aging, outdated, poorly maintained and inadequate waste infrastructure and technology.
• Due to lack of resources, it is often cheaper for municipalities to outsource rather than provide inefficient and inadequate services
• Legislation not strictly enforced.
• Skills shortages in the waste sectors.

Opportunities

• Increased capital investment resulting from government initiatives to develop infrastructure.
• Job creation opportunities in the waste sector, including the DEA’s programmes such as Youth Jobs in Waste and Youth Environmental Services
• Opportunities provided by different waste streams for materials and energy recovery as a means of generating energy and reducing waste disposal to landfill.

Threats

• Lack of compliance with environmental requirements, the Waste Act regulations and standards.
• Population growth and the growing complexity of the waste stream which will put further pressure on poorly maintained, inadequate facilities.

Outlook

There is plenty of room for growth and development in the solid waste management sector. Jan Palm, IWMSA President, emphasised, “The waste management landscape needs to explore technologies to maximise diversion from landfill, such as the Waste to Energy (WtE) process. Not only does WtE alleviate the burden on available landfill airspace, it also provides an entirely new source of energy for South Africa, which can power many homes.” However, Webb Meko, Business Development Director for sub-Saharan Africa at engineering, procurement and construction firm, Black & Veatch, cautioned, “Capital investment challenges must be overcome to drive widespread adoption of WtE projects”. Meanwhile the Minister of Environmental Affairs explained that the introduction of the circular economy principle to solid waste management will require a radical rethink of the country’s perception of waste which should be seen as “a resource with value once it is recovered, reduced, re-used and recycled and provides the opportunity for beneficiation, enterprise development and innovation.” Of concern to stakeholders however is the capacity of current waste management facilities that require investment into maintenance and expansion.

Read More..
The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa
The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2017

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.21 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2019-02-06

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2015-06-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2014-03-24

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 11
4.1. Local 11
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 19
4.1.2. Regulations 20
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 22
4.2. Continental 25
4.3. International 28
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 30
5.1. Economic Environment 30
5.2. Rising Operating Costs 31
5.3. Infrastructure 31
5.4. Labour 32
5.5. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 35
5.6. Alternative Treatment Technologies to Divert Waste from Landfill 39
5.7. Environmental Concerns 44
5.8. Cyclicality 45
6. COMPETITION 45
6.1. Barriers to Entry 46
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 47
8. OUTLOOK 48
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 48
10. REFERENCES 49
10.1. Publications 49
10.2. Websites 50
APPENDIX 1 52
Alternative Waste Treatment Options Suitable for African Countries 52
COMPANY PROFILES 53
AVERDA SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 53
COMPASS MEDICAL WASTE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 56
CONSOLIDATED WASTE (PTY) LTD 58
DRIZIT ENVIRONMENTAL CC 60
DSW CLEANSING AND SOLID WASTE (DIVISION OF ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY) 62
DUMPIT SA WASTE REMOVAL (PTY) LTD 64
ENVIROSERV WASTE MANAGEMENT (PTY) LTD 66
ESKOM ROTEK INDUSTRIES SOC LTD 70
INFORMAL SETTLEMENT WATER AND WASTE SERVICES (DIVISION OF CITY OF CAPE TOWN) 73
INTER-WASTE (PTY) LTD 74
JOBE ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 77
ORICOL ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES (PTY) LTD 79
PIKITUP JOHANNESBURG (PTY) LTD 81
RAPID SPILL RESPONSE CC 84
RECYCLING SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 86
ROYAL HASKONINGDHV (PTY) LTD 88
TEDCOR GROUP (PTY) LTD 91
WASTE GIANT INVESTMENT HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 93
WASTE GROUP (PTY) LTD (THE) 95
WASTE-MART (PTY) LTD 97
WASTEPLAN (PTY) LTD 99

Report Coverage

This report describes the current situation in the waste management industry, possible solutions to the challenges and factors influencing the success of the sector. The report also profiles 21 industry players, ranging from EnviroServ Waste Management Ltd which specialises in the transport and disposal of hazardous waste and employs 2,285 people to Talbot and Talbot based in KwaZulu-Natal which is a specialist water management and treatment company employing 140 people

Introduction

This report covers the management of solid waste, excluding recycling, and the collection and treatment of domestic wastewater, excluding industrial and mining wastewater, a sector where public and private companies are involved. In the solid waste sector 90% of South African municipal waste ends up on landfills. Recent research indicates that “at least R17bn per annum in terms of resource value, or R36bn per annum in terms of resource value plus avoided costs, is lost to South Africa’s economy through disposal to landfill. This loss of resources has a direct adverse impact on South Africa’s economy and its environment.” The Department of Science and Technology believes that the direct contribution of the waste sector to GDP can grow from the current estimate of 0.51% to 1.0% through optimisation of the economic value of waste as a resource.

Strengths

• Department of Science and Technology Waste and Water R&D projects in support of a green economy and the national system of innovation.
• Supportive legislative framework, with the National Waste Management Strategy as implementation agent.

Weaknesses

• 90% of waste generated was still being disposed of to landfill in 2011.
• Aging, outdated, poorly maintained and inadequate waste and wastewater infrastructure and technology.
• Due to lack of resources, it is often cheaper for municipalities to outsource rather than provide inefficient and inadequate services.
• Legislation not strictly enforced.
• Skills shortages in the waste and wastewater treatment sectors.

Opportunities

• Increased capital investment resulting from government initiatives to develop infrastructure.
• Job creation opportunities in the waste sector, including DEA’s programmes such as Youth Jobs in Waste and Youth Environmental Services
• Opportunities provided by different waste streams for materials and energy recovery as a means of generating energy and reducing waste disposal to landfill.

Threats

• Lack of compliance with environmental requirements, the Waste Act and Water Act regulations and standards.
• Population growth and the growing complexity of the waste stream which will put further pressure on poorly maintained, inadequate facilities.

Outlook

Both cabinet ministers in this sector are using fighting talk, with the DEA minister declaring “war on waste” and the DWS minister calling for “a water and sanitation revolution”. The Minister of Environmental Affairs emphasises that, “Waste has value – both a social and an economic value” and believes that if properly managed, the waste management sector could inject over R50bn into the economy of the country.” The Minister of Water and Sanitation estimates that R67bn is needed each year over the next decade to fund and maintain water and sanitation infrastructure. With the current budget of R16.4bn, better management and planning have to be implemented to bring about a move from highly centralised, expensive wastewater treatment plants to a combination of centralised and localised waste treatment operations, a move from high-energy wastewater treatment plants and technologies to low-energy and energy-producing wastewater treatment systems, and the building of smaller wastewater treatment plants that can be easily managed and that can be developed within a very short period of time.

Read More..
The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa
The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2015

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.21 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2019-02-06

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2017-10-12

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2014-03-24

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Supply Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 10
4.1. Local 10
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 17
4.1.2. Regulations & Government Programmes 18
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 21
4.2. Continental 23
4.3. International 25
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 28
5.1. Economic Environment 28
5.2. Rising Operating Costs 29
5.3. Labour 29
5.3.1. General 29
5.3.2. Unions 30
5.3.3. Skills and Training 31
5.4. Infrastructure 32
5.5. Information Technology 33
5.6. Growing Realisation of the Economic Value of Waste 35
5.7. Implementation of Alternative Treatment Technologies to Divert Waste from Landfill 37
5.8. Environmental Concerns 42
5.9. Cyclicality 42
5.10. Electricity Supply Constraints 43
6. COMPETITION 44
6.1. Barriers to Entry 44
6.2. Research and Development (R&D) 45
6.3. Innovation 46
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 48
8. OUTLOOK 49
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 49
10. REFERENCES 50
10.1. Publications 50
10.2. Websites 52
APPENDIX 1 54
National Waste Management Summit Resolutions 54
APPENDIX 2 55
Typical Anaerobic Digestion Process Flow Diagram 55
ORGANOGRAM 56
COMPANY PROFILES 58
COMPASS WASTE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 58
CONSOLIDATED WASTE (PTY) LTD 60
DRIZIT-ENVIRONMENTAL CC 62
DSW CLEANSING & SOLID WASTE (DIVISION OF ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY) 64
DUMPIT SA WASTE REMOVAL (PTY) LTD 66
ENVIROSERV WASTE MANAGEMENT LTD 68
INTER-WASTE (PTY) LTD 73
ORICOL ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES (PTY) LTD 76
OTTO WASTE SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 78
PIKITUP JOHANNESBURG SOC LTD 80
RAPID SPILL RESPONSE CC 84
RECYCLING SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD 86
ROSHCON SOC LTD 88
ROYAL HASKONINGDHV (PTY) LTD 91
SOLID WASTE TECHNOLOGIES SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 93
TALBOT AND TALBOT (PTY) LTD 95
TEDCOR GROUP (PTY) LTD 97
UTILITY SERVICES (DIVISION OF CAPE TOWN UNICITY) 100
WASTE GIANT INVESTMENT HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 102
WASTE GROUP (PTY) LTD (THE) 104
WASTE PLAN (PTY) LTD 106
WASTE-MART (PTY) LTD 108
WASTEMAN HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 110

Introduction

This report covers the management of solid waste, excluding recycling, and the collection and treatment of domestic wastewater, excluding industrial and mining wastewater, a sector where public and private companies are involved. The total value of the sector was estimated at R15.3bn in 2012, with R8.3bn attributed to the formal public sector and R6.5bn to the private waste sector. The most recent statistics show that in 2011, 90.1% of the 108 million tonnes of waste generated was disposed of to landfill. Commenting on this high percentage, the Deputy Minister of Environment Affairs, Rejoice Mabudafhasi, stressed that it is “imperative for the country to introduce innovative approaches in dealing with waste, particularly focusing on diverting waste from landfill disposal to other waste management options.” The effective implementation of the Waste Act No 59 of 2008 and its accompanying standards and regulations should, according to Dr Suzan Oelofse President of the Institute of Waste Management of Southern Africa (IWMSA) bring about much needed change.

Strengths

• Available government funding to reach Millennium Development Goals for sanitation
• Department of Science and Technology Waste and Water R&D projects in support of a green economy and the national system of innovation.
• Supportive legislative framework, with the National Waste Management Strategy as implementation agent.

Weaknesses

• 90.1% of waste generated was still being disposed of to landfill in 2011.
• Aging, outdated, poorly maintained and inadequate waste and wastewater infrastructure and technology.
• Legislation not strictly enforced
• Skills shortages in the waste and wastewater treatment sectors.

Opportunities

• Job creation opportunities in the waste sector, including DEA’s programmes such as Youth Jobs in Waste and Youth Environmental Services
• The Green Economy Plan, supported by the R800m Green Fund to facilitate investment in green initiatives to support poverty reduction and job creation.
• Waste-to-energy as a means of generating energy and reducing waste disposal on landfill.

Threats

• Lack of compliance with environmental requirements, the Waste Act and Water Act regulations and standards.
• Population growth and the growing complexity of the waste stream which will put further pressure on poorly maintained, inadequate facilities.

Outlook

With the increased demand for services as well as more complex and hazardous waste streams and wastewater constituents, there will be increased pressure on poorly maintained, inadequate facilities. Role players in both sectors mentioned that these factors will intensify the need to employ more skilled personnel, adapt current practices and introduce more innovative, appropriate and creative solutions. According to the National Waste Management Strategy, “while the elimination of waste in its entirety may not be feasible, it is possible through the systematic application of the waste management hierarchy to reach a point within the next few decades where, re-use, recycling, recovery and treatment overtake landfills as preferred options for waste management.”

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa
The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2014

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.21 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2019-02-06

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2017-10-12

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Solid Waste Management Industry in South Africa 2015-06-29

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Solid Waste Management 1
2.2. Wastewater Collection and Treatment 1
2.3. Industry Supply Chain 2
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 2
3.1. Solid Waste Management 2
3.2. Wastewater Collection and Treatment 3
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4.1. Local 6
4.1.1. Solid Waste Management 6
4.1.2. Wastewater Collection and Treatment 8
4.1.3. Corporate Actions 9
4.1.4. Regulations 9
4.1.5. Black Economic Empowerment 10
4.2. Continental 10
4.3. International 11
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 12
5.1. Economic Environment 12
5.2. Infrastructure 12
5.3. Labour Resources 13
5.3.1. Unions 13
5.3.2. Productivity 14
5.3.3. Skills and Training 14
5.3.4. Job Creation and SMME Development 15
5.4. Rising Operating Costs 16
5.5. Information Technology 17
5.6. Technology 17
5.7. Environmental Concerns 18
5.8. Cyclicality 19
6. COMPETITION 20
6.1. Barriers to Entry 20
6.2. Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 20
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 21
8. OUTLOOK 21
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 21
10. REFERENCES 22
10.1. Publications 22
10.2. Websites 23
APPENDIX 1 24
National Waste Management Strategy Goals 24
APPENDIX 2 25
Regulations 25
APPENDIX 3 26
Estimated Solid Waste Management Costs 26
APPENDIX 4 27
Industrial Action and Work Stoppages 27
APPENDIX 5 29
Capacity Required to Implement the Waste Act 29
APPENDIX 6 30
Current Wastewater-related Qualifications 30
APPENDIX 7 31
Waste-To-Energy Programme Opportunities 31
APPENDIX 8 32
Current Waste-Related Research Programmes 32
ORGANOGRAM 33
COMPANY PROFILES 35
BUHLE WASTE (PTY) LTD 35
CAPE TOWN UNICITY UTILITY SERVICES DIVISION 36
COMPASS WASTE SERVICES (PTY) LTD 37
CONSOLIDATED WASTE (PTY) LTD 39
DRIZIT-ENVIRONMENTAL CC 41
DSW CLEANING & SOLID WASTE (DIVISION OF ETHEKWINI MUNICIPALITY) 43
DUMPIT SA WASTE REMOVAL (PTY) LTD 44
ELECTRONIC RESTORATION SERVICES (PTY) LTD 45
ENVIROSERV WASTE MANAGEMENT LTD 46
INTER-WASTE (PTY) LTD 49
ORICOL ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES (PTY) LTD 51
OTTO WASTE SYSTEMS (PTY) LTD 52
PIKITUP JOHANNESBURG (SOC) LTD 53
RAPID SPILL RESPONSE CC 55
ROSHCON SOC LTD 56
SOLID WASTE TECHNOLOGIES SA (PTY) LTD 58
TALBOT & TALBOT (PTY) LTD 60
TEDCOR GROUP (PTY) LTD 62
VESTPOINT 106 (PTY) LTD 63
WASTE GIANT INVESTMENT HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 64
WASTE GROUP (PTY) LTD (THE) 65
WASTE PLAN (PTY) LTD 66
WASTEMAN HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 67