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Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research in South Africa

Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research 2019

Nina Shand | South Africa | 04 October 2019

Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research 2016

Nina Shand | South Africa | 03 October 2016

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Introduction

This report focuses on Veterinary Services and Veterinary Research in South Africa. According to South African Veterinary Council (SAVC) June 2019 statistics, there are 6,808 veterinary and para-veterinary practitioners registered in South Africa, 17% more than the 5,032 registered in 2016. Data from Statistica, an online statistics portal, indicates the revenue from South African veterinary practices is estimated to reach R7.16bn by 2020, up from R6.68bn in 2016. Pet ownership is on the rise and with close to 10 million dogs, South Africa ranks as having the 9th highest dog ownership in the world. However, the tough macroeconomic conditions in the country are expected to affect growth in the pet care industry.

Strengths

• Department of Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries has developed a strategy to improve veterinary services.
• The community service programme places vets in rural areas and addresses the under-servicing of certain areas.
• The veterinary pharmaceuticals market is highly competitive, professional and well-established.

Weaknesses

• The geographic mismatch between available veterinary practitioners and demand for veterinary services, which has led to a situation in which large groups of people do not have easy access to veterinary services.
• There is a need for more specialisation, especially in fish health and harvesting.
• Unfilled posts in the state veterinary services.

Opportunities

• Diverse career paths are available with many options ranging from traditional practice, to public- and private-sector positions in biomedicine, animal research, wildlife, the environment, food production and public health.
• Game ranching is the country’s sixth biggest agricultural sector with 10,000 game farms all requiring veterinarians.
• Improvements in regulatory environment with the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority offering an improved
• Sales of pet care products at veterinary practices represents an opportunity for veterinarians in private practice.
• service.
• The increase in trade of animal products means more opportunities for veterinarians and para-veterinarians.

Threats

• Food safety and security if appropriate veterinary procedures are not followed and adequate monitoring is not undertaken
• Not all para-veterinary professionals are licensed to practice.

Outlook

The outlook for the veterinary industry is challenging given the constrained economic conditions, including a volatile rand, which has led to cost pressures. The pet food industry, contrary to global trends, has been constrained with marginal value growth despite the increase in the number of pets. Veterinary manufacturers and suppliers are likely to focus on low-risk strategies in the short to medium term. Challenges in the industry pertain mostly to the provision of veterinary services, particularly in the rural areas, to maintain animal health across the country.

Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research
Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research 2019

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.21 (USD)*

Historical Reports

Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research 2016-10-03

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 4
2.2. Geographic Position 5
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
4.1. Local 7
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 11
4.1.2. Regulations 11
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 13
4.2. Continental 14
4.3. International 16
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 18
5.1. Economic Environment 18
5.2. Government Initiatives 20
5.3. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 20
5.4. Labour 23
5.5. Cyclicality 25
5.6. Environmental Concerns 25
6. COMPETITION 27
6.1. Barriers to Entry 27
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 28
8. OUTLOOK 29
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 30
10. REFERENCES 30
10.1. Publications 30
10.2. Websites 31

Report Coverage

The report on the country’s veterinarian industry describes current conditions, research and development efforts and discusses factors influencing the success of the sector which is represented by active industry associations. All practising veterinary professionals are required to register with the South African Veterinary Council (SAVC) while the South African Veterinary Association (SAVA) is a voluntary organisation. Those veterinarians looking after animals in the agricultural environment fall under the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) and the Black Veterinary Forum represents the interests of previously disadvantaged veterinarians.

Introduction

This report focuses on veterinary activities and research in South Africa. The number of veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals has increased by 15% over the past five years from 4,826 in 2011 to 5,032 in 2016. However, there remains a shortage of veterinary professionals operating in the rural areas and in the state sector while there is an oversupply in urban areas. To alleviate the geographic mismatch of skills, the government has introduced a compulsory community service requirement for all newly qualified veterinarians, starting in 2016.

Strengths

• Compulsory Community Service for newly-qualified veterinarians will help with disease control, livestock production, ambulatory services and pet ownership education.
• The veterinary pharmaceuticals market is highly competitive, professional and well-established.

Weaknesses

• Lack of post-graduate training for specialised services such as fish health and harvesting.
• The geographic mismatch between available veterinary practitioners and demand for veterinary services, which has led to a situation in which large groups of people do not have easy access to veterinary services.
• Unfilled posts in the state veterinary services.

Opportunities

• The DAFF has developed a strategy to improve veterinary services in South Africa.
• With the increase in the volume of trade in animal products there is an increased need for veterinarians.

Threats

• Decrease in food sales in the veterinary retail market as economic conditions deteriorate further.
• Food safety and security if appropriate veterinary procedures are not followed and adequate monitoring is not undertaken.
• Shrinking demand for veterinary services in the pet sector if the economic pressures intensify.

Outlook

As the world becomes more affluent, the demand for livestock and for pets seems likely to increase, in turn leading to a growing need for vaccines in order to ensure both food security and safety. Stakeholders concur that as a developing country, South Africa will need to make significant investments to meet this need. Challenges in the veterinarian sector pertain mostly to the provision of veterinary services, particularly in the rural areas, to maintain national animal health across the country. In the private sector, the demand for veterinary services in the small animal sector has diminished given constrained economic circumstances. The sector expects to lose food sales as a revenue channel within the next few years which could radically increase fees if veterinarian practices are to remain profitable.

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Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research
Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 73.21 (USD)*

Historical Reports

Veterinary Activities including Veterinary Research 2019-10-04

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $104.58 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 3
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 4
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 7
4.1. Local 7
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 8
4.1.2. Regulations 8
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 10
4.2. Continental 10
4.3. International 12
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 13
5.1. Economic Environment 13
5.2. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 14
5.3. Labour Resources 16
5.4. Cyclicality 18
5.5. Environmental Concerns 18
6. COMPETITION 19
6.1. Barriers to Entry 20
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 20
8. OUTLOOK 21
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 21
10. REFERENCES 22
10.1. Publications 22
10.2. Websites 23