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wholesale retail food industry south africa

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2023

Gary Phillips | South Africa | 20 February 2023

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2021

Gary Phillips | South Africa | 19 October 2021

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2020

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 15 April 2020

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2018

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 26 June 2018

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2016

Duncan Bekker | South Africa | 01 March 2016

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2014

Ingi Salgado | South Africa | 10 February 2014

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Report Coverage

This report on the wholesale and retail of food in South Africa includes comprehensive information on the state and size of the sector, the major players, developments, food and other input prices, economic factors, the presence of South African companies on the continent and the development of online delivery. There are profiles of 20 companies including the major retailers Shoprite, Pick n Pay, Woolworths, Spar and Massmart and wholesalers, cash and carry and buying groups including Africa Cash and Carry, Devland Cash and Carry, ICC Buying Group and Unitrade.

Introduction

• The wholesale and retail of food in South African generates well over R1.2tn in revenue, and even more including the growing but hard to quantify informal food trade.\r\n
• Food retail is concentrated and dominated by four national, vertically integrated companies that control more than half the market. \r\n
• Facing reducing returns in a mature, saturated South African urban market and African investments that have produced mixed results, retailers have invested in strategies to lower prices, differentiate stores and find new markets in small towns, rural areas, and townships. \r\n
• Food wholesalers, independent retailers, and informal traders, under pressure from this retail expansion, have adopted new strategies to attract consumers. \r\n
• The biggest risk to the success of these responses is the ability of consumers to continue to spend in a low growth, high inflation and high unemployment environment.

Strengths

• A large and growing informal sector with strong linkages to formal wholesale supply.
• A strong regional presence in Southern Africa.
• Capability for rapid increase in ecommerce trading.
• Growing population and stable food demand.
• Relatively high formal sector participation and extensive supermarket footprint throughout the country.
• Resilient companies with expertise and experience operating in a challenging trading environment.
• Very well-developed and efficient supply chains and logistics networks.

Weaknesses

• Highly dependent on economic growth to support consumer spending beyond essential purchases.
• Increasing competition and relatively high barriers to entry in urban areas and shopping centres.
• Informal sector very sensitive to shocks and vulnerable to supply interruptions.
• Lack of skills.
• Market is increasingly mature and saturated.
• Relatively thin trading margins with profit growth primarily supported by streamlining and cost-cutting.

Opportunities

• Enforcement of the findings of the Competition Commission’s grocery retail market inquiry and the agreements of the Agricultural and Agro-Processing Master Plan can open opportunities for smaller players.
• Expanding convenience market, forecourt retail, and pre-prepared meals.
• Market share growth among affluent consumers.
• Private label brand growth.
• Rapid population growth, urbanisation, and rise of the middle-class in regional Africa to boost demand for food and modern shopping.
• Rapidly expanding online shopping demand, initiated by the pandemic
• Roll out of discounters, franchises, and corporate spaza shops to grow formal market participation.

Threats

• Continued poor economic growth and rising unemployment is affecting consumer spending.
• Digital disruption from innovative online retailers.
• Growing competition in all market segments.
• Large retailers’ investment exposure to risks associated with volatile African markets.
• Traders facing rising input and operating costs but being unable to pass costs onto price-conscious consumers.

Outlook

• Wholesale and retail of food in South Africa needs a rise in consumer spending after three tough years in which unforeseen events have dampened economic recovery from the pandemic. \r\n
• While the industry is resilient, well-capitalised, has strong leadership, and is innovating to protect margins and stimulate consumer demand, it needs a recovery in economic growth and wealth. \r\n
• The threat of a global recession, political turmoil, and the electricity crisis make it unclear whether consumer spending will increase. \r\n
• The continued pace of innovative investments in the supply chain, services, store footprints, online retail and new store formats will be vital in securing a positive outlook for the industry.

Read More..
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2023

Full Report

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 6 650.00(ZAR) estimated $ 370.46 (USD)*

Industry Organogram

R 450.00(ZAR) estimated $ 25.07 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2021-10-19

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $362.10 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2020-04-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2018-06-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2016-03-01

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2014-02-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 5
2.2. Geographic Position 6
2.3. Size of the Industry 7
3. LOCAL 11
3.1. State of the Industry 11
3.2. Key Trends 14
3.3. Key Issues 19
3.4. Notable Players 23
3.5. Trade 29
3.6. Corporate Actions 30
3.7. Regulations 33
3.8. Enterprise Development and Social Development 33
4. AFRICA 35
5. INTERNATIONAL 40
6. INFLUENCING FACTORS 42
6.1. Unforeseen Events 42
6.2. Economic Environment 43
6.3. Labour 44
6.4. Environmental Issues 47
6.5. Technology, R&D, Innovation 47
6.6. Government Support 49
6.7. Input Costs 49
7. COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT 51
7.1. Competition 51
7.2. Ownership Structure of the Industry 52
7.3. Barriers to Entry 53
8. SWOT ANALYSIS 54
9. OUTLOOK 55
10. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 55
11. REFERENCES 55
11.1. Publications 55
11.2. Websites 56
APPENDIX 1 58
Summary of Notable Players 58
COMPANY PROFILES 62
Africa Cash and Carry (Crown Mines) (Pty) Ltd 62
Big Save Distribution Centre (Pty) Ltd 63
Buying Exchange Company (Pty) Ltd (The) 65
Consolidated Store Holdings (Pty) Ltd 67
Devland Cash and Carry (Pty) Ltd 70
Elite Star Trading 56 (Pty) Ltd 72
Food Lovers Holdings (Pty) Ltd 74
ICC Buying Group (Pty) Ltd 78
Independent Buying Consortium (Pty) Ltd 80
Kit Kat Group (Pty) Ltd 82
Massmart Holdings Ltd 85
Millat Convenience (Pty) Ltd 91
Pick n Pay Stores Ltd 93
Premjee Cash and Carry (Pty) Ltd 98
Shoprite Holdings Ltd 100
SPAR Group Ltd (The) 106
Subtropico Ltd 112
Unitrade Management Services (Pty) Ltd 116
Wellness Warehouse (Pty) Ltd 118
Woolworths (Pty) Ltd 122

Report Coverage

This report focuses on the wholesale and retail of food in South Africa. It includes comprehensive information on the size and state of the sector, the performance and developments of notable players and the major factors influencing the sector. There are profiles of 19 companies including major players such as Shoprite, Pick n Pay and Woolworths and Massmart, notable private companies such as Food Lovers and Wellness Warehouse, and cash and carry companies such as Africa Cash and Carry.

Introduction

The wholesale and retail trade of food in South Africa jointly generated revenue of just under R950bn in 2020. When factoring in the growing but hard to quantify informal food trade, revenues could be in excess of R1.1-trillion. The lion’s share of this revenue belongs to the formal food retailers dominated by national corporate supermarket chains who play the biggest role in shaping South Africa’s entire food system. Major companies have benefitted from the nearly three decades of a rapidly-growing South African middle class, the development of centralised distribution and application of new supply chain and logistics technologies, and the rapid growth of malls. The South African food retail sector is now defined by nationwide high-quality food supply, market concentration and maturity in its growth patterns. Food retail has come to account for more than half of all retail sales in South Africa. National supermarket chains and their development over the past few decades have also had a fundamental impact on the shape and functioning of the food wholesale and upstream food processing and agricultural industries.\r\n\r\nThe strength and resilience of the food retail industry in adequately supplying South Africa was evident during the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 (despite the restrictions on consumers and businesses) and the widespread unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng in July 2021 (despite the disruption to trading, property, stock levels and supply lines). The vulnerability of the industry, however, has been seen in the challenge of weakening consumer spending power and saturation in supermarket and shopping centre supply in major urban areas. This saturation has driven retailers to invest in Africa and in South Africa’s small towns, rural areas and townships. South Africa’s biggest food retailers have become Africa’s biggest food retailers but the results of this expansion have been mixed and strategy adjustments abound. The seeking of new markets in South Africa’s margins has prompted resilient responses from wholesalers, independent retailers and informal food traders who have long occupied these regions but found their livelihoods threatened by supermarket and mall expansion. One innovative result has been the “hybridisation” of food wholesale into retail resulting in a blurring of channels of supply. While feeling their way to better margins under these dynamics, the food retailers and hybrids were provided with an unexpected positive development: the huge increase in demand for online grocery shopping during the coronavirus pandemic. While the long-term impact of this sudden increase in online grocery retailing is not yet clear, many maintain that a fundamental shift has taken place and the migration of shoppers online will continue and unlock new avenues of value for food wholesale and retail.

Strengths

• A large and growing informal sector with strong linkages to formal wholesale supply.
• A strong regional presence in Southern Africa.
• Capability for rapid adoption of ecommerce trading.
• Growing population and stable food demand.
• One of the largest private sector employment industries.
• Relatively high formal sector participation and extensive supermarket footprint throughout the country.
• Resilient companies with expertise and experience operating in a challenging trading environment.
• Very well-developed and efficient supply chains and logistics networks.

Weaknesses

• Highly dependent on economic growth to support consumer spending beyond essential purchases.
• Increasing competition and relatively high barriers to entry in urban areas and shopping centres.
• Informal sector markets very sensitive to shocks and vulnerable to supply interruptions.
• Lack of skills.
• Market is increasingly mature and saturated, and organic growth is slowing.
• Relatively thin trading margins with profit growth primarily supported by streamlining and cost-cutting.
• Susceptible to volatility in agricultural production as well as drought and other natural disasters.

Opportunities

• Enforcement of the findings of the Competition Commission’s inquiry and the agreements of the Agricultural and Agro-Processing Master Plan can open opportunities for smaller players.
• Expanding convenience market, forecourt retail, and pre-prepared meals.
• Expansion into value-added and financial services.
• Market share growth among affluent consumers.
• Private label brand growth.
• Rapid population growth, urbanisation, and rise of the middle-class in regional Africa to boost demand for food and modern shopping.
• Rapidly expanding online shopping demand, initiated by the coronavirus pandemic
• Roll out of discounters, franchises, and corporate spaza shops to grow formal market participation.

Threats

• Concerns regarding land reform and expropriation without compensation.
• Continued poor economic growth and rising unemployment may affect consumer spending.
• Coronavirus outbreak and economic lockdown may result in significant long-term impact on economy, employment, and incomes.
• Digital disruption from innovative online retailers.
• Growing competition in all market segments.
• Large retailers investment exposure to risks associated with volatile African markets
• Traders facing rising input and operating costs but being unable to pass costs onto price-conscious consumers.

Outlook

Food wholesale and retail developed into a trillion rand industry off the back of growing wealth of the middle class with increasing real spending power and increasing sophistication of preferences. This has facilitated the rise of supermarkets and the spread of shopping centres. However, since 2008 consumer spending has been suppressed and the retail industry has reached maturity and saturation as has mall development. The spread of supermarkets into the rest of Africa as a response has had mixed to poor results while the spread of supermarkets and retail centres into South Africa’s small towns, townships and rural areas has brought immense pressure to bear on independent retailers, cash and carry wholesalers and informal traders. More recently there has been an increased focus on market segments expected to deliver relatively higher returns or provide a competitive advantage, such as fresh and private label products, ecommerce, and convenience and value-added services. But the importance of growing consumer spending power and habits was highlighted again through the economic shocks of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 and the country’s slow recovery in 2021. Without strong growth in real consumer spending, market opportunities are likely to remain limited with an increasing number of retailers chasing the small high end of the market and competition for the low end of the market threatening the viability of smaller players. Despite the challenges of maturity, saturation and suppressed consumer spending, the food wholesale and retail industry has shown remarkable capacity for innovation and shifts, and the successful entry and growth of new players, while it has significant capital to test possibilities. For this reason, and the hope of real increases in household wealth and spending power, that the outlook of the industry looks bright.

Read More..
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2021

Full Report

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $362.10 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 4 550.00(ZAR) estimated $ 253.47 (USD)*

Industry Organogram

R 450.00(ZAR) estimated $ 25.07 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2023-02-20

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2020-04-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2018-06-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2016-03-01

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2014-02-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 2
2.1. Industry Value Chain 8
2.2. Geographic Position 9
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 13
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 16
4.1. Local 16
4.1.1. Trade 28
4.1.2. Corporate Actions 30
4.1.3. Regulations 30
4.1.4. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 31
4.2. Continental 33
4.3. International 39
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 40
5.1. Coronavirus 40
5.2. Economic Environment 48
5.3. Impact of the July 2021 Unrest 50
5.4. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 52
5.5. Rising Input Costs 53
5.6. Environmental Concerns 55
5.7. Labour 55
6. COMPETITION 61
6.1. Barriers to Entry 62
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 63
8. OUTLOOK 64
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 65
10. REFERENCES 65
9.1. Publications 65
9.2. Websites 66
APPENDIX 1 67
Summary of Notable players 67
COMPANY PROFILES 71
AFRICA CASH AND CARRY (CROWN MINES) (PTY) LTD 71
BIG SAVE DISTRIBUTION CENTRE (PTY) LTD 72
BUYING EXCHANGE COMPANY (PTY) LTD (THE) 74
CONSOLIDATED STORE HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 76
DEVLAND CASH AND CARRY (PTY) LTD 79
ELITE STAR TRADING 56 (PTY) LTD 81
FOOD LOVERS HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 83
ICC BUYING GROUP (PTY) LTD 87
INDEPENDENT BUYING CONSORTIUM (PTY) LTD 88
KIT KAT GROUP (PTY) LTD 90
MASSMART HOLDINGS LTD 92
PICK N PAY STORES LTD 98
PREMJEE CASH AND CARRY (PTY) LTD 103
SHOPRITE HOLDINGS LTD 105
SPAR GROUP LTD (THE) 111
SUBTROPICO LTD 117
UNITRADE MANAGEMENT SERVICES (PTY) LTD 120
WELLNESS WAREHOUSE (PTY) LTD 122
WOOLWORTHS (PTY) LTD 125

Report Coverage

This report examines South Africa’s wholesale and retail market for food, with a particular focus on the country’s large supermarkets. It includes comprehensive information on the state and size of the sector and its major players, and influencing factors including the effect of coronavirus, the rise of online shopping and the increasing importance of technology. There are profiles of 10 companies including the dominant retailers Shoprite, Pick n Pay, Spar and Woolworths, as well as FoodLovers Holdings, fresh produce market agent Subtropico and specialist player Wellness Warehouse. \r\n

Introduction

This report examines South Africa’s wholesale and retail market for food, with a particular focus on the country’s large supermarkets. Retail grocery sales totalled over R580bn in 2019 and the industry is led by four large retailers: Shoprite, Spar, Pick n Pay, and Woolworths. Food retailers are among the leading private sector employers in the country and the total industry provides employment for around 450,000 people. A bustling informal food trade operates alongside the supermarkets and wider formal sector. The industry is increasingly mature and competitive and has been negatively affected by South Africa’s protracted struggle with low GDP growth, high unemployment and constrained consumer spending. The outbreak of the coronavirus has seen a spike in food sales, but the longer-term impact of the crisis may have an adverse effect on food retailers. South Africa’s competition authorities recently made a number of recommendations to promote competition in the industry, with potentially significant effects for the market’s overall structure.

Strengths

• Growing population and stable food demand.
• Large commercial farmers and food suppliers; over 90% local sourcing and net food exports.
• One of the largest private sector employment industries.
• Relatively high formal sector participation and extensive supermarket footprint throughout the country.
• Resilient companies with expertise and experience operating in a challenging trading environment.
• Strong presence in regional Africa.
• Very well developed and efficient supply chains and logistics networks.

Weaknesses

• Highly dependent on economic growth to support consumer spending beyond essential purchases.
• Increasing competition and relatively high barriers to entry in urban areas and shopping centres.
• Lack of skills.
• Market is increasingly mature and organic growth is slowing.
• Relatively thin trading margins with profit growth primarily supported by streamlining and cost-cutting.
• Susceptible to volatility in agricultural production as well as drought and other natural disasters.

Opportunities

• Expanding convenience market, forecourt retail, and pre-prepared meals.
• Expansion into value-added and financial services.
• Growing market for online shopping.
• Market share growth among affluent consumers.
• Online grocery shopping participation to be driven by coronavirus outbreak.
• Private label brand growth.
• Rapid population growth, urbanisation, and rise of the middle-class in regional Africa to boost demand for food and modern shopping.
• Roll out of discounters, franchises, and corporate spaza shops to grow formal market participation.

Threats

• Competition inquiry, recommendations, and potential regulations may have far-reaching implications for the structure and efficiency of the market.
• Concerns regarding land reform and expropriation without compensation.
• Continued poor economic growth and rising unemployment may pressure consumer spending.
• Coronavirus outbreak and economic lockdown may result in significant long-term impact on economy, employment, and incomes.
• Digital disruption from innovative online retailers.
• Growing competition in all market segments.
• Rising input and operating costs; unable to pass costs onto price-conscious consumers.

Outlook

The grocery sector is maturing and, as organic growth has slowed, supermarkets have been adversely affected by South Africa’s stagnant economy, high unemployment, rising operating costs, and generally constrained consumer spending. Nevertheless, the leading food retailers have, with some important exceptions, continued to deliver relatively strong results despite the challenging trading environment. Sales growth is being supported by store expansions and heavy investment in technology, supply chains, and operational efficiencies. There is also an increased focus on market segments expected to deliver relatively higher returns or provide a competitive advantage, such as fresh and private label products, e-commerce, and a host of convenience and value-added services. However, competition and expenses are growing, and supermarkets are seldom able to realise meaningful price increases given the wider pressures on consumers; none expect trading conditions to ease in the medium-term.\r\n\r\nThe outbreak of the coronavirus and the resulting five-week lockdown of the economy have seen a sharp rise in food demand, with supermarkets’ sales volume increasing more than 20% year-on-year. However, retail analysts expect demand to normalise in the coming months, and the boom may give way to a decline if the outbreak and lockdown have a significant effect on incomes. An increasing number of economists predict a relatively severe South African and global recession in the wake of the virus, which may deepen many of the structural challenges facing the grocery industry.

Read More..
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2020

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2023-02-20

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2021-10-19

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $362.10 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2018-06-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2016-03-01

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2014-02-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4.1. Local 6
4.1.1. Coronavirus 25
4.1.2. Corporate Actions 30
4.1.3. Regulations 31
4.1.4. Enterprise Development and Socio-Economic Development 33
4.2. Continental 34
4.3. International 39
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 40
5.1. Economic Environment 40
5.2. Input Costs 41
5.3. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 42
5.4. Labour 44
5.5. Environmental Concerns 46
5.6. Household Food Expenditure 46
5.7. Consumer Preferences 48
6. COMPETITION 49
6.1. Barriers to Entry 51
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 52
8. OUTLOOK 53
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 54
10. REFERENCES 54
10.1. Publications 54
10.2. Websites 55
APPENDIX 1 57
Summary of Notable Players 57
COMPANY PROFILES 61
BIG SAVE DISTRIBUTION CENTRE (PTY) LTD 61
CHOPPIES ENTERPRISES LTD 63
FOOD LOVERS HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 71
MASSMART HOLDINGS LTD 74
PICK N PAY STORES LTD 79
SHOPRITE HOLDINGS LTD 84
SPAR GROUP LTD (THE) 89
SUBTROPICO LTD 95
WELLNESS WAREHOUSE (PTY) LTD 98
WOOLWORTHS (PTY) LTD 101

Report Coverage

The report on the wholesale and retail of food examines current conditions, the strategies employed to increase market share and factors that influence the success of the highly competitive sector. Profiles for ten companies are included in this comprehensive report. Apart from the “Big Five”, Shoprite, Pick \'n Pay, SPAR, Massmart and Woolworths, there are profiles for Wellness Warehouse (Pty) Ltd, which has 29 stores, including one online store, and Choppies Enterprises Ltd, which secured approval to acquire 21 retail stores owned by South African firm, Jwayelani Retail during 2016.

Introduction

This report focuses on the wholesale and retail of food in South Africa, with a particular focus on the country\'s large supermarkets. Retail sales of food at general dealers and supermarkets totalled R439bn in 2017 with a further R84bn in food, tobacco and beverages being sold in specialised stores. The sector provides employment for some 400,000 people. A bustling informal food trade operates alongside the formal sector and provides significant employment. The industry is dominated by a handful of large retailers including Shoprite, Pick \'n Pay, SPAR, Woolworths and Massmart. The sector has seen relatively muted growth for a number of years owing to poor macroeconomic conditions, and constrained consumer spending. Despite difficult trading conditions, South African grocery firms continued to invest in new stores and distribution centres in 2017 while attempting to win market share through innovation.

Strengths

• High levels of supermarket penetration and retail participation.
• Resilient major players are able to produce competent results even in challenging trading environment.
• Significant contribution to employment.
• Strong presence in continental Africa.
• Very well-developed supply chains and logistics networks.

Weaknesses

• Highly dependent on disposable income and economic growth.
• Lack of skills.
• Larger firms face relatively high barriers to entry.
• Market maturity and thin trading margins.
• Susceptible to volatility in agricultural sector.

Opportunities

• African economic growth and emerging middle class will drive food demand.
• Expanding convenience market including forecourt stores.
• Expansion into value-added and financial services.
• Expansion of private label brands.
• Increasing market for online retailing.
• Market share growth in the middle- and upper-market.
• Potential to formalise the large informal market.

Threats

• Competition Commission inquiry may have far-reaching implications for the structure of the market.
• Continued slow economic growth and high unemployment will pressure consumer spending.
• Increasing food prices can pressure volume growth.
• Increasing input and operating costs.
• Land reform destabilising the agricultural supply base.

Outlook

Grocery retail has remained negatively affected by slow economic growth, high unemployment and generally constrained consumer spending. Despite this challenging business environment, the majority of food retailers have managed to achieve increases in turnover and profit in recent years. Grocery firms are increasingly looking to compete for wealthy consumers with mounting investment in convenience stores and products, including premium fresh fruit and meat. The roll-out of value-added services is also a key pillar of future strategy according to Pick \'n Pay CEO Richard Brasher. Despite increasing price competition and marginal market share shifts between players, all of the large retailers are pursuing expansion strategies while focusing on efficiencies in their supply chains. Supply chain management and the reduction of operating costs represent “the next competitive frontier,” according to Trade Intelligence.\r\n\r\nGrocery firms have welcomed South Africa\'s new political leadership, hoping that increasing consumer confidence will help buoy the segment. The impact of the GDP contraction in Q1 2018 remains unclear but the majority of large retailers continue to forecast muted growth in the medium term as “the shine around President Cyril Ramaphosa\'s election begins to wear off.” Shoprite CEO, Pieter Engelbrecht, stated, “We no longer consider poor trading environments as exceptional and accept that difficult conditions are the prevailing milieu.”

Read More..
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2018

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2023-02-20

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2021-10-19

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $362.10 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2020-04-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2016-03-01

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2014-02-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 8
4.1. Local 8
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 19
4.1.2. Regulations 20
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 22
4.2. Continental 24
4.3. International 26
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 27
5.1. Economic Environment 27
5.2. Price Increases 28
5.3. Consumer Preferences 30
5.4. Labour 30
5.5. Environmental Concerns 32
5.6. Ethical Trading and Governance 33
5.7. Technology, Research and Development (R&D) and Innovation 33
6. COMPETITION 35
6.1. Barriers to Entry 40
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 41
8. OUTLOOK 41
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 42
10. REFERENCES 42
10.1. Publications 42
10.2. Websites 43
COMPANY PROFILES 44
BIG SAVE DISTRIBUTION CENTRE (PTY) LTD 44
CHOPPIES ENTERPRISES LTD 46
FOOD LOVERS HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 55
MASSMART HOLDINGS LTD 58
PICK N PAY STORES LTD 64
SHOPRITE HOLDINGS LTD 69
SPAR GROUP LTD (THE) 74
SUBTROPICO LTD 79
WELLNESS WAREHOUSE (PTY) LTD 83
WOOLWORTHS (PTY) LTD 86

Report Coverage

The South African Food Retail report examines current conditions and key trends in the industry, including the consolidation and market share growth of the largest players, and their commitment to cutting costs through extensive management of their supply chains. The dominant large retailers, Shoprite, Pick ‘n Pay, SPAR, Woolworths and Massmart are profiled, as are four other role players including Fruit and Veg City, which while a relatively small player, has grown rapidly as a force in the retail of fresh produce.

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa\'s retail food sector, with particular emphasis placed upon the large supermarkets as well as the major grocery product lines. The retail food sector was worth some R400bn in 2014 while the informal market is estimated to be worth a further R150bn. Including beverage and tobacco retailing the sector employs some 380,000 people. The industry is dominated by a handful of large retailers including Shoprite, Pick ‘n Pay, SPAR, and Woolworths. Although for many years the sector has dealt with low volume growth attributable to poor macroeconomic performance and constrained consumer spending power, the dominant firms continue to produce positive, though muted, results. This report examines key trends in the industry, including the consolidation and market share growth of the largest players, and their commitment to cutting costs through extensive management of their supply chains.

Strengths

• Great degree of supermarket penetration
• Very strong presence in continental Africa.
• Well developed supply chains and distribution divisions.
• Well known and trusted brands.
• Well regulated with high food safety standards.

Weaknesses

•  Low profit margins.
• Large supermarket dominance renders it difficult for independent firms to enter the market.
• Skills shortages in middle management.

Opportunities

• African economic growth growing a middle class with tastes for a diverse basket of groceries.
• Extending the range of high-profit private brands.
• Growing domestic and regional population driving increased food demand.
• Increasing the market for online retailing as a result of increasing internet penetration.

Threats

• Steeply rising costs driven by unstable electricity supply, wage increases and a shortage of casual labour.
• The drought of 2015/2016 is set to markedly increase the prices of a number of key grocery products including maize, bread, dairy and meat.
• Weak economic growth constraining consumer spending power.

Outlook

Poor macroeconomic performance is set to continue to constrain consumer spending power and analysts suggest that volume growth is unlikely to increase markedly. According to experts such as Syd Vianello, this may entail a slowing of floor space expansion in the coming years. However, the industry has proved remarkably resilient to depressed economic conditions and the continuing focus on supply chain management and cost cutting suggests that, although revenue growth will be slow and profit margins low, the sector is likely to remain stable in the short-term. Increasingly advanced logistics and distribution divisions will allow many South African retailers to overcome the difficulties posed by expansion into the rest of Africa and the leveraging of this market by South African firms is expected to continue. According to PwC, “Long-term success will depend upon a continued focus on the consumer, and consumer services, efficient supply chains and a low cost of doing business.” The expansion of local retailers into the convenience market, both at service station forecourts and through the diverse range of complementary services offered in-store suggest that they are meeting these fundamental requirements. Despite a “sound fundamental business”, a number of retailers warned in their 2015 reports that without a change in the macroeconomic performance of South Africa, the industry outlook may turn negative in the mid-term. Shoprite has called for the “urgent implementation of the National Development Plan” to combat this possibility.

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The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2016

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2023-02-20

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2021-10-19

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $362.10 (USD)*

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The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2020-04-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2018-06-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2014-02-10

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

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Table of Contents

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PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Value Chain 2
2.2. Geographic Position 4
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 5
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 11
4.1. Local 11
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 24
4.1.2. Regulations 26
4.1.3. Enterprise Development and Social Economic Development 27
4.2. Continental 30
4.3. International 31
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 32
5.1. Economic Environment 32
5.2. Electricity Supply and Increasing Input Costs 33
5.3. Labour Resources 34
5.4. Research and Development (R&D) 36
5.5. Environmental Concerns 39
6. COMPETITION 40
6.1. Barriers to Entry 42
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 45
8. OUTLOOK 46
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 46
10. REFERENCES 47
10.1. Publications 47
10.2. Websites 47
COMPANY PROFILES 49
Big Save Distribution Centre (Pty) Ltd 49
Fruit and Veg City Holdings (Pty) Ltd 51
Massmart Holdings Ltd 54
Pick n Pay Stores Ltd 59
Shoprite Holdings Ltd 63
SPAR Group Ltd (The) 69
Subtropico Ltd 75
Wellness Warehouse (Pty) Ltd 78
Woolworths (Pty) Ltd 80

Introduction

This report focuses on South Africa’s highly competitive wholesale and retail food sector which is worth an estimated R400bn a year. This figure is based on a variety of sources and excludes tobacco and beverages that are typically included in official data. The sector is dominated by five large retailers, Shoprite, Pick ‘n Pay, Spar, Massmart and Woolworths. Supermarket penetration is high compared to the rest of Africa, yet at the same time, a sizeable, albeit declining, informal sector is serviced by wholesalers. Global trends in retail, especially online shopping, have been slow to take hold in South Africa, although top-end retailers are positioning for such changes.

Strengths

• High supermarket penetration.
• Strong investment in supply chains.
• Well-known brands.

Weaknesses

• A volatile labour force, high wages and inflexible labour policies.
• Retail sector dominated by a few big players.
• Skills shortages, particularly in mid-management.

Opportunities

• A growing South African middle class.
• Expansion of retailers’ private labels.
• Huge potential market in the rest of Africa.
• Online shopping.
• Opening of new stores in townships and rural areas.

Threats

• Growth of new online retailers outside of the established players.
• Worsening of the economy, further reducing the disposable income of consumers.

Outlook

According to analysts and retailers, poor macroeconomic fundamentals and high commodity prices will continue to weigh down the wholesale and retail food sector in 2014 as household budgets remain under pressure. The Bureau of Market Research anticipates that the general economic environment will encourage consumers to conduct bulk shopping, particularly at supermarkets, and move away from specialty food products.\r\n\r\nNevertheless, retailers are pumping money into new store openings as they move into townships and rural areas, which have long been the domain of informal traders and spaza shops. Pick ‘n Pay plans to spend R1.8bn in 2014, mostly on expanding its footprint via 100 new stores. In the words of Spar, the “fight” is on to secure new sites.\r\n\r\nAccording to PwC, the overall outlook for South African retail sector growth is “modest, if not fragile” up until 2016. Food sales are forecast to expand relatively slowly in this timeframe, but there will be growth opportunities at the top and lower ends of the income spectrum. Analysts believe that to remain competitive in a challenging trading environment, retailers will need to identify, respond to and leverage changes in consumer behaviour.

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa
The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2014

Full Report

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

Industry Landscape

R 1 330.00(ZAR) estimated $ 74.09 (USD)*

Historical Reports

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2023-02-20

R 9 500.00(ZAR) estimated $529.23 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2021-10-19

R 6 500.00(ZAR) estimated $362.10 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2020-04-15

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2018-06-26

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

The Wholesale and Retail of Food Industry in South Africa 2016-03-01

R 1 900.00(ZAR) estimated $105.85 (USD)*

View Report Add to Cart

Table of Contents

[ Close ]
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION 1
2. DESCRIPTION OF THE INDUSTRY 1
2.1. Industry Supply Chain 1
3. SIZE OF THE INDUSTRY 2
4. STATE OF THE INDUSTRY 6
4.1. Local 6
4.1.1. Corporate Actions 7
4.1.2. Regulations 7
4.1.3. Black Economic Empowerment 8
4.2. Continental 9
4.3. International 10
5. INFLUENCING FACTORS 12
5.1. Economic Environment 12
5.2. Rising Input Costs 12
5.3. Labour Resources 12
5.4. Distribution Channels 13
5.5. Information Technology 13
5.6. Cyclicality 14
5.7. Environmental Concerns 14
6. COMPETITION 15
6.1. Barriers to Entry 16
6.2. Research and Development (R&D) 16
6.3. Innovation 16
7. SWOT ANALYSIS 17
8. OUTLOOK 17
9. INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS 17
10. REFERENCES 19
10.1. Publications 19
10.2. Websites 19
ORGANOGRAM 20
COMPANY PROFILES 22
AIR CHEFS (SOC) LTD 22
FAIRLANE AGENCIES (PTY) LTD 24
FRUIT & VEG CITY HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD 25
KERRY INGREDIENTS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY) LTD 27
KEY DISTRIBUTORS (PTY) LTD 28
LONRHO PLC 29
MARSHALL MONTEAGLE PLC 32
MASSMART HOLDINGS LTD 34
PICK \'N PAY STORES LTD 38
PROMASIDOR (SOUTH AFRICA) (PTY) LTD 62
SHOPRITE HOLDINGS LTD 63
SPAR GROUP LTD (THE) 68
SUBTROPICO LTD 71
WALTLOO BIG SAVE (PTY) LTD 73
WELLNESS WAREHOUSE (PTY) LTD 74
WOOLWORTHS (PTY) LTD 75