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The impact of covid on individual industries

The move to lock down level two brings with it some hope that our economy will gain a fresh momentum to recovery. The WOW industry reports researched since the beginning of lock down have covered the direct impact of the pandemic on various industries. These are some of the observations: Online retail Prior to the corona virus pandemic, online retail sales grew by 20% in 2019, but still accounted for less than 2% of South Africa’s R1-trillion overall retail trade. This compares with ecommerce penetration of 13% to 20% in relatively mature markets in Europe, the US, and China. Read More

Morocco Snapshot

Morocco’s new coalition government has focused on pro-poor reforms, job creation and implementing the country’s industrialisation strategy, which aims to increase the industrial sector’s share to 23% of GDP by 2020 from 18.5% in 2016. Evidence of its aspirations and success in this regard can be found in the automotive sector, where, in 2017, it overtook South Africa as the continent’s largest producer of passenger cars. Read More

Madagascar Snapshot

Madagascar is endowed with a wealth of natural resources. These include semi-precious stones, graphite, chromite, coal, bauxite, rare earth elements, salt, quartz, tar sand and mica. The country supplies around 80% of the world’s vanilla. Other main agricultural products include coffee, sugarcane, palm oil, cloves, cocoa, rice, cassava, beans, bananas and peanuts. The island nation also derives revenue from fishing, forestry and hydropower. Renowned for its biodiversity and its unique flora and fauna, Madagascar is often described the ‘Galapagos of the African continent’. Read More

Ethiopia Snapshot

The winds of change are sweeping through Ethiopia since Abiy Ahmed became prime minister in April. Ethiopia is sub-Saharan Africa’s fastest growing economy, with average growth of around 10% a year for over a decade. GDP was US$8.2bn in 2000, $80bn by 2017, and will reach US$129bn by 2023, according to the IMF. The IMF’s World Economic Outlook expects 8.5% GDP growth in 2019 – while the World Bank expects 8% – outstripping advanced economies and global growth, which is expected at 3.9%. Read More